Limits...
Ghrelin receptors in non-Mammalian vertebrates.

Kaiya H, Kangawa K, Miyazato M - Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) (2013)

Bottom Line: The growth hormone secretagogue-receptor (GHS-R) was discovered in humans and pigs in 1996.Although the ghrelin system in non-mammalian vertebrates is a subject of great interest, protein sequence data for the receptor in non-mammalian vertebrates has been limited until recently, and related biological information has not been well organized.In this review, we summarize current information related to the ghrelin receptor in non-mammalian vertebrates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biochemistry, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center Research Institute , Osaka , Japan.

ABSTRACT
The growth hormone secretagogue-receptor (GHS-R) was discovered in humans and pigs in 1996. The endogenous ligand, ghrelin, was discovered 3 years later, in 1999, and our understanding of the physiological significance of the ghrelin system in vertebrates has grown steadily since then. Although the ghrelin system in non-mammalian vertebrates is a subject of great interest, protein sequence data for the receptor in non-mammalian vertebrates has been limited until recently, and related biological information has not been well organized. In this review, we summarize current information related to the ghrelin receptor in non-mammalian vertebrates.

No MeSH data available.


GHS-R1a, 2a and GHS-R1a-LR proteins in non-mammalian vertebrates. Dense shading indicates common amino acids (AAs) in all species. Red letters under black circles represent specific AAs related to ligand binding, selectivity, and constitutive activity of GHS-R1a and 2a. Boxes show the typical motifs of the G-protein-coupled receptor transmembrane domains 5 and 7. Sequences were aligned using GENETYX-Mac version 15.0.1.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3713435&req=5

Figure 3: GHS-R1a, 2a and GHS-R1a-LR proteins in non-mammalian vertebrates. Dense shading indicates common amino acids (AAs) in all species. Red letters under black circles represent specific AAs related to ligand binding, selectivity, and constitutive activity of GHS-R1a and 2a. Boxes show the typical motifs of the G-protein-coupled receptor transmembrane domains 5 and 7. Sequences were aligned using GENETYX-Mac version 15.0.1.

Mentions: We have summarized the non-mammalian vertebrates for which the cDNA or genes of GHS-R have been identified and made available in public databases in Table 1 (fish) and Table 2 (reptiles, amphibians, and birds). The AA sequences of GHS-R1a, 2a; GHS-R1a-LR; and their multiple alignments are shown in Figure 3.


Ghrelin receptors in non-Mammalian vertebrates.

Kaiya H, Kangawa K, Miyazato M - Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) (2013)

GHS-R1a, 2a and GHS-R1a-LR proteins in non-mammalian vertebrates. Dense shading indicates common amino acids (AAs) in all species. Red letters under black circles represent specific AAs related to ligand binding, selectivity, and constitutive activity of GHS-R1a and 2a. Boxes show the typical motifs of the G-protein-coupled receptor transmembrane domains 5 and 7. Sequences were aligned using GENETYX-Mac version 15.0.1.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3713435&req=5

Figure 3: GHS-R1a, 2a and GHS-R1a-LR proteins in non-mammalian vertebrates. Dense shading indicates common amino acids (AAs) in all species. Red letters under black circles represent specific AAs related to ligand binding, selectivity, and constitutive activity of GHS-R1a and 2a. Boxes show the typical motifs of the G-protein-coupled receptor transmembrane domains 5 and 7. Sequences were aligned using GENETYX-Mac version 15.0.1.
Mentions: We have summarized the non-mammalian vertebrates for which the cDNA or genes of GHS-R have been identified and made available in public databases in Table 1 (fish) and Table 2 (reptiles, amphibians, and birds). The AA sequences of GHS-R1a, 2a; GHS-R1a-LR; and their multiple alignments are shown in Figure 3.

Bottom Line: The growth hormone secretagogue-receptor (GHS-R) was discovered in humans and pigs in 1996.Although the ghrelin system in non-mammalian vertebrates is a subject of great interest, protein sequence data for the receptor in non-mammalian vertebrates has been limited until recently, and related biological information has not been well organized.In this review, we summarize current information related to the ghrelin receptor in non-mammalian vertebrates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biochemistry, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center Research Institute , Osaka , Japan.

ABSTRACT
The growth hormone secretagogue-receptor (GHS-R) was discovered in humans and pigs in 1996. The endogenous ligand, ghrelin, was discovered 3 years later, in 1999, and our understanding of the physiological significance of the ghrelin system in vertebrates has grown steadily since then. Although the ghrelin system in non-mammalian vertebrates is a subject of great interest, protein sequence data for the receptor in non-mammalian vertebrates has been limited until recently, and related biological information has not been well organized. In this review, we summarize current information related to the ghrelin receptor in non-mammalian vertebrates.

No MeSH data available.