Limits...
The effects of alerting signals in masked priming.

Fischer R, Plessow F, Kiesel A - Front Psychol (2013)

Bottom Line: Alerting signals often serve to reduce temporal uncertainty by predicting the time of stimulus onset.The resulting response time benefits have often been explained by facilitated translation of stimulus codes into response codes on the basis of established stimulus-response (S-R) links.Alerting signals resulted in significantly enhanced masked priming effects for masked prime stimuli that included and that did not include established S-R links (i.e., target vs. novel primes).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Technische Universität Dresden Dresden, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Alerting signals often serve to reduce temporal uncertainty by predicting the time of stimulus onset. The resulting response time benefits have often been explained by facilitated translation of stimulus codes into response codes on the basis of established stimulus-response (S-R) links. In paradigms of masked S-R priming alerting signals also modulate response activation processes triggered by subliminally presented prime stimuli. In the present study we tested whether facilitation of visuo-motor translation processes due to alerting signals critically depends on established S-R links. Alerting signals resulted in significantly enhanced masked priming effects for masked prime stimuli that included and that did not include established S-R links (i.e., target vs. novel primes). Yet, the alerting-priming interaction was more pronounced for target than for novel primes. These results suggest that effects of alerting signals on masked priming are especially evident when S-R links between prime and target exist. At the same time, an alerting-priming interaction also for novel primes suggests that alerting signals also facilitate stimulus-response translation processes when masked prime stimuli provide action-trigger conditions in terms of programmed S-R links.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentiles of participants' response times (RTs) in Experiment 2 as a function of the absence vs. presence of an alerting signal for target primes and novel primes, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3713395&req=5

Figure 4: Percentiles of participants' response times (RTs) in Experiment 2 as a function of the absence vs. presence of an alerting signal for target primes and novel primes, respectively.

Mentions: Similar to Experiment 1, the RT distribution analysis showed that there was no interaction between the factors Alerting signal, Congruence, Prime-type, and Percentile, F(8, 200) = 1.00, p = 0.392, η2p = 0.04. Yet, irrespective of prime-type, the impact of the alerting signal on priming seemed less pronounced for the slowest RTs of the RT distribution, F(8, 200) = 3.38, p = 0.026, η2p = 0.12 [F(1, 25) = 6.54, p = 0.017, η2p = 0.21, linear contrast]. Finally, although masked priming effects for novel primes were rather stable across the RT distribution, masked priming effects for target primes declined at larger percentiles resulting in an interaction between Congruence, Prime-type, and Percentile (see Figure 4), F(8, 200) = 4.27, p = 0.021, η2p = 0.15 [F(1, 25) = 5.20, p = 0.031, η2p = 0.17, linear contrast].


The effects of alerting signals in masked priming.

Fischer R, Plessow F, Kiesel A - Front Psychol (2013)

Percentiles of participants' response times (RTs) in Experiment 2 as a function of the absence vs. presence of an alerting signal for target primes and novel primes, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3713395&req=5

Figure 4: Percentiles of participants' response times (RTs) in Experiment 2 as a function of the absence vs. presence of an alerting signal for target primes and novel primes, respectively.
Mentions: Similar to Experiment 1, the RT distribution analysis showed that there was no interaction between the factors Alerting signal, Congruence, Prime-type, and Percentile, F(8, 200) = 1.00, p = 0.392, η2p = 0.04. Yet, irrespective of prime-type, the impact of the alerting signal on priming seemed less pronounced for the slowest RTs of the RT distribution, F(8, 200) = 3.38, p = 0.026, η2p = 0.12 [F(1, 25) = 6.54, p = 0.017, η2p = 0.21, linear contrast]. Finally, although masked priming effects for novel primes were rather stable across the RT distribution, masked priming effects for target primes declined at larger percentiles resulting in an interaction between Congruence, Prime-type, and Percentile (see Figure 4), F(8, 200) = 4.27, p = 0.021, η2p = 0.15 [F(1, 25) = 5.20, p = 0.031, η2p = 0.17, linear contrast].

Bottom Line: Alerting signals often serve to reduce temporal uncertainty by predicting the time of stimulus onset.The resulting response time benefits have often been explained by facilitated translation of stimulus codes into response codes on the basis of established stimulus-response (S-R) links.Alerting signals resulted in significantly enhanced masked priming effects for masked prime stimuli that included and that did not include established S-R links (i.e., target vs. novel primes).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Technische Universität Dresden Dresden, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Alerting signals often serve to reduce temporal uncertainty by predicting the time of stimulus onset. The resulting response time benefits have often been explained by facilitated translation of stimulus codes into response codes on the basis of established stimulus-response (S-R) links. In paradigms of masked S-R priming alerting signals also modulate response activation processes triggered by subliminally presented prime stimuli. In the present study we tested whether facilitation of visuo-motor translation processes due to alerting signals critically depends on established S-R links. Alerting signals resulted in significantly enhanced masked priming effects for masked prime stimuli that included and that did not include established S-R links (i.e., target vs. novel primes). Yet, the alerting-priming interaction was more pronounced for target than for novel primes. These results suggest that effects of alerting signals on masked priming are especially evident when S-R links between prime and target exist. At the same time, an alerting-priming interaction also for novel primes suggests that alerting signals also facilitate stimulus-response translation processes when masked prime stimuli provide action-trigger conditions in terms of programmed S-R links.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus