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Music, emotion, and time perception: the influence of subjective emotional valence and arousal?

Droit-Volet S, Ramos D, Bueno JL, Bigand E - Front Psychol (2013)

Bottom Line: The results showed that the effect of tempo in music, associated with a subjective arousal effect, was the major factor that produced time distortions with time being judged longer for fast than for slow tempi.When the tempo was held constant, no significant effect of timbre on the time judgment was found although the orchestral music was judged to be more arousing than the piano music.Nevertheless, emotional valence did modulate the tempo effect on time perception, the pleasant music being judged shorter than the unpleasant music.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratoire de Psychologie Sociale et Cognitive, University Blaise Pascal, CNRS Clermont-Ferrand, France.

ABSTRACT
The present study used a temporal bisection task with short (<2 s) and long (>2 s) stimulus durations to investigate the effect on time estimation of several musical parameters associated with emotional changes in affective valence and arousal. In order to manipulate the positive and negative valence of music, Experiments 1 and 2 contrasted the effect of musical structure with pieces played normally and backwards, which were judged to be pleasant and unpleasant, respectively. This effect of valence was combined with a subjective arousal effect by changing the tempo of the musical pieces (fast vs. slow) (Experiment 1) or their instrumentation (orchestral vs. piano pieces). The musical pieces were indeed judged more arousing with a fast than with a slow tempo and with an orchestral than with a piano timbre. In Experiment 3, affective valence was also tested by contrasting the effect of tonal (pleasant) vs. atonal (unpleasant) versions of the same musical pieces. The results showed that the effect of tempo in music, associated with a subjective arousal effect, was the major factor that produced time distortions with time being judged longer for fast than for slow tempi. When the tempo was held constant, no significant effect of timbre on the time judgment was found although the orchestral music was judged to be more arousing than the piano music. Nevertheless, emotional valence did modulate the tempo effect on time perception, the pleasant music being judged shorter than the unpleasant music.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Proportion of long responses plotted against stimulus duration for the original and the backward music with a slow and fast tempo in the 0.5–1.7 and the 2.0–6.8 s duration conditions.
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Figure 1: Proportion of long responses plotted against stimulus duration for the original and the backward music with a slow and fast tempo in the 0.5–1.7 and the 2.0–6.8 s duration conditions.

Mentions: Figure 1 presents the proportion of long responses [p(long)] plotted against the comparison durations for the different types of musical pieces, which were judged to be high or low-arousing as a function of their tempo (fast vs. slow, respectively) and pleasant or unpleasant as a function of their version (original vs. backward). An examination of Figure 1 reveals that the major factor that produced time distortions was the tempo. Indeed, the musical stimuli were systematically judged longer with a fast than a slow tempo. To examine the bisection performance in more detail, we calculated two indexes: The point of subjective equality, also called the bisection point (BP), and the Weber Ratio (WR) (Table 2). The former is the stimulus duration (t) that gives rise to p(long) = 0.50. The WR is an index of time sensitivity. It is the Difference Limen (t[p(long) = 0.75] − t[p(long) = 0.25] /2) divided by the BP. The lower the WR value, the higher the sensitivity to time. The regression method originally used by Church and Deluty (1977) and subsequently employed by other authors (e.g., Wearden and Ferrara, 1996; Droit-Volet and Wearden, 2002) was used to calculate these 2 temporal indexes.


Music, emotion, and time perception: the influence of subjective emotional valence and arousal?

Droit-Volet S, Ramos D, Bueno JL, Bigand E - Front Psychol (2013)

Proportion of long responses plotted against stimulus duration for the original and the backward music with a slow and fast tempo in the 0.5–1.7 and the 2.0–6.8 s duration conditions.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3713348&req=5

Figure 1: Proportion of long responses plotted against stimulus duration for the original and the backward music with a slow and fast tempo in the 0.5–1.7 and the 2.0–6.8 s duration conditions.
Mentions: Figure 1 presents the proportion of long responses [p(long)] plotted against the comparison durations for the different types of musical pieces, which were judged to be high or low-arousing as a function of their tempo (fast vs. slow, respectively) and pleasant or unpleasant as a function of their version (original vs. backward). An examination of Figure 1 reveals that the major factor that produced time distortions was the tempo. Indeed, the musical stimuli were systematically judged longer with a fast than a slow tempo. To examine the bisection performance in more detail, we calculated two indexes: The point of subjective equality, also called the bisection point (BP), and the Weber Ratio (WR) (Table 2). The former is the stimulus duration (t) that gives rise to p(long) = 0.50. The WR is an index of time sensitivity. It is the Difference Limen (t[p(long) = 0.75] − t[p(long) = 0.25] /2) divided by the BP. The lower the WR value, the higher the sensitivity to time. The regression method originally used by Church and Deluty (1977) and subsequently employed by other authors (e.g., Wearden and Ferrara, 1996; Droit-Volet and Wearden, 2002) was used to calculate these 2 temporal indexes.

Bottom Line: The results showed that the effect of tempo in music, associated with a subjective arousal effect, was the major factor that produced time distortions with time being judged longer for fast than for slow tempi.When the tempo was held constant, no significant effect of timbre on the time judgment was found although the orchestral music was judged to be more arousing than the piano music.Nevertheless, emotional valence did modulate the tempo effect on time perception, the pleasant music being judged shorter than the unpleasant music.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratoire de Psychologie Sociale et Cognitive, University Blaise Pascal, CNRS Clermont-Ferrand, France.

ABSTRACT
The present study used a temporal bisection task with short (<2 s) and long (>2 s) stimulus durations to investigate the effect on time estimation of several musical parameters associated with emotional changes in affective valence and arousal. In order to manipulate the positive and negative valence of music, Experiments 1 and 2 contrasted the effect of musical structure with pieces played normally and backwards, which were judged to be pleasant and unpleasant, respectively. This effect of valence was combined with a subjective arousal effect by changing the tempo of the musical pieces (fast vs. slow) (Experiment 1) or their instrumentation (orchestral vs. piano pieces). The musical pieces were indeed judged more arousing with a fast than with a slow tempo and with an orchestral than with a piano timbre. In Experiment 3, affective valence was also tested by contrasting the effect of tonal (pleasant) vs. atonal (unpleasant) versions of the same musical pieces. The results showed that the effect of tempo in music, associated with a subjective arousal effect, was the major factor that produced time distortions with time being judged longer for fast than for slow tempi. When the tempo was held constant, no significant effect of timbre on the time judgment was found although the orchestral music was judged to be more arousing than the piano music. Nevertheless, emotional valence did modulate the tempo effect on time perception, the pleasant music being judged shorter than the unpleasant music.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus