Limits...
PET/MRI Imaging in High-Risk Sarcoma: First Findings and Solving Clinical Problems.

Schuler MK, Richter S, Beuthien-Baumann B, Platzek I, Kotzerke J, van den Hoff J, Ehninger G, Reichardt P - Case Rep Oncol Med (2013)

Bottom Line: In this paper, we present three cases and first data.Combined PET/MRI technique can support the process of clinical decision-making and give answers to some meaningful questions when treating patients with STS.Therefore, the combined modality of simultaneous PET/MRI offers new pieces to the puzzle of sarcoma treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine I, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technical University at Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Simultaneous positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new whole-body hybrid PET/MR imaging technique that combines metabolic and cross-sectional diagnostic imaging. Since the use of MRI in imaging of soft-tissue sarcoma is extremely beneficial, investigation of the combined PET/MRI is of great interest. In this paper, we present three cases and first data. Combined PET/MRI technique can support the process of clinical decision-making and give answers to some meaningful questions when treating patients with STS. Therefore, the combined modality of simultaneous PET/MRI offers new pieces to the puzzle of sarcoma treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A 68-year-old patient with abdominal liposarcoma. The large tumour (white arrows) is well recognizable on both the T2-weighted images ((a) and (d)) and the contrast-enhanced, fat-saturated T1-weighted images ((b) and (e)). The fused PET/MR images ((c) and (f)) show an inhomogeneous FDG uptake (black arrows).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3713328&req=5

fig3: A 68-year-old patient with abdominal liposarcoma. The large tumour (white arrows) is well recognizable on both the T2-weighted images ((a) and (d)) and the contrast-enhanced, fat-saturated T1-weighted images ((b) and (e)). The fused PET/MR images ((c) and (f)) show an inhomogeneous FDG uptake (black arrows).

Mentions: The tumour was 23 × 19 × 10 cm in size, partly necrotic, and showed only a slight uptake of FDG (Figure 3). Therefore, it was decided to resect the tumour. In case of a high-grade relapse we certainly would have favoured a systemic treatment approach. The histological examination confirmed the suspected relapse of the well-differentiated liposarcoma.


PET/MRI Imaging in High-Risk Sarcoma: First Findings and Solving Clinical Problems.

Schuler MK, Richter S, Beuthien-Baumann B, Platzek I, Kotzerke J, van den Hoff J, Ehninger G, Reichardt P - Case Rep Oncol Med (2013)

A 68-year-old patient with abdominal liposarcoma. The large tumour (white arrows) is well recognizable on both the T2-weighted images ((a) and (d)) and the contrast-enhanced, fat-saturated T1-weighted images ((b) and (e)). The fused PET/MR images ((c) and (f)) show an inhomogeneous FDG uptake (black arrows).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3713328&req=5

fig3: A 68-year-old patient with abdominal liposarcoma. The large tumour (white arrows) is well recognizable on both the T2-weighted images ((a) and (d)) and the contrast-enhanced, fat-saturated T1-weighted images ((b) and (e)). The fused PET/MR images ((c) and (f)) show an inhomogeneous FDG uptake (black arrows).
Mentions: The tumour was 23 × 19 × 10 cm in size, partly necrotic, and showed only a slight uptake of FDG (Figure 3). Therefore, it was decided to resect the tumour. In case of a high-grade relapse we certainly would have favoured a systemic treatment approach. The histological examination confirmed the suspected relapse of the well-differentiated liposarcoma.

Bottom Line: In this paper, we present three cases and first data.Combined PET/MRI technique can support the process of clinical decision-making and give answers to some meaningful questions when treating patients with STS.Therefore, the combined modality of simultaneous PET/MRI offers new pieces to the puzzle of sarcoma treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine I, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technical University at Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Simultaneous positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new whole-body hybrid PET/MR imaging technique that combines metabolic and cross-sectional diagnostic imaging. Since the use of MRI in imaging of soft-tissue sarcoma is extremely beneficial, investigation of the combined PET/MRI is of great interest. In this paper, we present three cases and first data. Combined PET/MRI technique can support the process of clinical decision-making and give answers to some meaningful questions when treating patients with STS. Therefore, the combined modality of simultaneous PET/MRI offers new pieces to the puzzle of sarcoma treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus