Limits...
Functional and structural brain modifications induced by oculomotor training in patients with age-related macular degeneration.

Rosengarth K, Keck I, Brandl-Rühle S, Frolo J, Hufendiek K, Greenlee MW, Plank T - Front Psychol (2013)

Bottom Line: Despite substantial variability in the training effects, on average, AMD patients benefited from the training measurements as indexed by significant improvements in their fixation stability, visual acuity, and reading speed.We also found a significant increase in gray and white matter in the posterior cerebellum after training in the patient group.Our results show that functional and structural brain changes can be associated, at least on the short-term, with benefits of oculomotor and/or reading training in patients with central scotomata resulting from AMD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Experimental Psychology, University of Regensburg Regensburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are reliant on their peripheral visual field. Oculomotor training can help them to find the best area on intact peripheral retina and to efficiently stabilize eccentric fixation. In this study, nine patients with AMD were trained over a period of 6 months using oculomotor training protocols to improve fixation stability. They were followed over an additional period of 6 months, where they completed an auditory memory training as a sham training. In this cross-over design five patients started with the sham training and four with the oculomotor training. Seven healthy age-matched subjects, who did not take part in any training procedure, served as controls. During the 6 months of training the AMD subjects and the control group took part in three functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sessions to assess training-related changes in the brain function and structure. The sham-training phase was accompanied by two more fMRI measurements, resulting in five MRI sessions at intervals of 3 months for all participants. Despite substantial variability in the training effects, on average, AMD patients benefited from the training measurements as indexed by significant improvements in their fixation stability, visual acuity, and reading speed. The patients showed a significant positive correlation between brain activation changes and improvements in fixation stability in the visual cortex during training. These correlations were less pronounced on the long-term after training had ceased. We also found a significant increase in gray and white matter in the posterior cerebellum after training in the patient group. Our results show that functional and structural brain changes can be associated, at least on the short-term, with benefits of oculomotor and/or reading training in patients with central scotomata resulting from AMD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Results from the Visual Functioning Questionnaire. One sided t-test revealed that fixation training significantly improved subjects' judgments of their near visual activities, their vision-specific mental health (depressive symptoms due to the vision deficit) and their vision specific dependency (e.g., rely on the help of others because of vision deficit) (p < 0.05). Other scales do not differ over training. Error bars reflect standard errors.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3713239&req=5

Figure 6: Results from the Visual Functioning Questionnaire. One sided t-test revealed that fixation training significantly improved subjects' judgments of their near visual activities, their vision-specific mental health (depressive symptoms due to the vision deficit) and their vision specific dependency (e.g., rely on the help of others because of vision deficit) (p < 0.05). Other scales do not differ over training. Error bars reflect standard errors.

Mentions: Figure 6 shows the obtained mean values of the subscales of the Visual Function Questionnaire (VFQ-25; Mangione et al., 2001), as collected from seven patients (for AMD1 and AMD2 did not complete the questionnaires). Three subscales (near activities, p = 0.014; vision specific: mental health, p = 0.047; vision specific: dependency, p = 0.046) showed significant improvements in one-sided t-tests.


Functional and structural brain modifications induced by oculomotor training in patients with age-related macular degeneration.

Rosengarth K, Keck I, Brandl-Rühle S, Frolo J, Hufendiek K, Greenlee MW, Plank T - Front Psychol (2013)

Results from the Visual Functioning Questionnaire. One sided t-test revealed that fixation training significantly improved subjects' judgments of their near visual activities, their vision-specific mental health (depressive symptoms due to the vision deficit) and their vision specific dependency (e.g., rely on the help of others because of vision deficit) (p < 0.05). Other scales do not differ over training. Error bars reflect standard errors.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3713239&req=5

Figure 6: Results from the Visual Functioning Questionnaire. One sided t-test revealed that fixation training significantly improved subjects' judgments of their near visual activities, their vision-specific mental health (depressive symptoms due to the vision deficit) and their vision specific dependency (e.g., rely on the help of others because of vision deficit) (p < 0.05). Other scales do not differ over training. Error bars reflect standard errors.
Mentions: Figure 6 shows the obtained mean values of the subscales of the Visual Function Questionnaire (VFQ-25; Mangione et al., 2001), as collected from seven patients (for AMD1 and AMD2 did not complete the questionnaires). Three subscales (near activities, p = 0.014; vision specific: mental health, p = 0.047; vision specific: dependency, p = 0.046) showed significant improvements in one-sided t-tests.

Bottom Line: Despite substantial variability in the training effects, on average, AMD patients benefited from the training measurements as indexed by significant improvements in their fixation stability, visual acuity, and reading speed.We also found a significant increase in gray and white matter in the posterior cerebellum after training in the patient group.Our results show that functional and structural brain changes can be associated, at least on the short-term, with benefits of oculomotor and/or reading training in patients with central scotomata resulting from AMD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Experimental Psychology, University of Regensburg Regensburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are reliant on their peripheral visual field. Oculomotor training can help them to find the best area on intact peripheral retina and to efficiently stabilize eccentric fixation. In this study, nine patients with AMD were trained over a period of 6 months using oculomotor training protocols to improve fixation stability. They were followed over an additional period of 6 months, where they completed an auditory memory training as a sham training. In this cross-over design five patients started with the sham training and four with the oculomotor training. Seven healthy age-matched subjects, who did not take part in any training procedure, served as controls. During the 6 months of training the AMD subjects and the control group took part in three functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sessions to assess training-related changes in the brain function and structure. The sham-training phase was accompanied by two more fMRI measurements, resulting in five MRI sessions at intervals of 3 months for all participants. Despite substantial variability in the training effects, on average, AMD patients benefited from the training measurements as indexed by significant improvements in their fixation stability, visual acuity, and reading speed. The patients showed a significant positive correlation between brain activation changes and improvements in fixation stability in the visual cortex during training. These correlations were less pronounced on the long-term after training had ceased. We also found a significant increase in gray and white matter in the posterior cerebellum after training in the patient group. Our results show that functional and structural brain changes can be associated, at least on the short-term, with benefits of oculomotor and/or reading training in patients with central scotomata resulting from AMD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus