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Getting Your Sea Legs.

Stoffregen TA, Chen FC, Varlet M, Alcantara C, Bardy BG - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: We evaluated postural activity (stance width, stance angle, and the kinematics of body sway) before and during a sea voyage.Our results revealed rapid changes in postural activity among novices at sea.Body sway measured at sea differed among participants as a function of their (subsequent) experience of mal de debarquement.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Sea travel mandates changes in the control of the body. The process by which we adapt bodily control to life at sea is known as getting one's sea legs. We conducted the first experimental study of bodily control as maritime novices adapted to motion of a ship at sea. We evaluated postural activity (stance width, stance angle, and the kinematics of body sway) before and during a sea voyage. In addition, we evaluated the role of the visible horizon in the control of body sway. Finally, we related data on postural activity to two subjective experiences that are associated with sea travel; seasickness, and mal de debarquement. Our results revealed rapid changes in postural activity among novices at sea. Before the beginning of the voyage, the temporal dynamics of body sway differed among participants as a function of their (subsequent) severity of seasickness. Body sway measured at sea differed among participants as a function of their (subsequent) experience of mal de debarquement. We discuss implications of these results for general theories of the perception and control of bodily orientation, for the etiology of motion sickness, and for general phenomena of perceptual-motor adaptation and learning.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Setting and conditions for body sway testing.A. Viewing of the nearby target and the horizon at the dock. B. Viewing of the nearby target and the horizon at sea.
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pone-0066949-g002: Setting and conditions for body sway testing.A. Viewing of the nearby target and the horizon at the dock. B. Viewing of the nearby target and the horizon at sea.

Mentions: The experimental setting is illustrated in Figure 2. During measurement of body sway participants stood with torso perpendicular to the ship's long axis. The line of gaze was parallel with the ship's long axis, directed toward the stern. The Accusway and WBB force plates were set up on the open deck, approximately 3 m apart with different experimenters operating each device. With this arrangement we could collect data from two participants simultaneously, which permitted us to run an adequate number of participants each day. Each participant stood on only one device each day. Individuals were not required to stand on the same force plate across days.


Getting Your Sea Legs.

Stoffregen TA, Chen FC, Varlet M, Alcantara C, Bardy BG - PLoS ONE (2013)

Setting and conditions for body sway testing.A. Viewing of the nearby target and the horizon at the dock. B. Viewing of the nearby target and the horizon at sea.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3686767&req=5

pone-0066949-g002: Setting and conditions for body sway testing.A. Viewing of the nearby target and the horizon at the dock. B. Viewing of the nearby target and the horizon at sea.
Mentions: The experimental setting is illustrated in Figure 2. During measurement of body sway participants stood with torso perpendicular to the ship's long axis. The line of gaze was parallel with the ship's long axis, directed toward the stern. The Accusway and WBB force plates were set up on the open deck, approximately 3 m apart with different experimenters operating each device. With this arrangement we could collect data from two participants simultaneously, which permitted us to run an adequate number of participants each day. Each participant stood on only one device each day. Individuals were not required to stand on the same force plate across days.

Bottom Line: We evaluated postural activity (stance width, stance angle, and the kinematics of body sway) before and during a sea voyage.Our results revealed rapid changes in postural activity among novices at sea.Body sway measured at sea differed among participants as a function of their (subsequent) experience of mal de debarquement.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Sea travel mandates changes in the control of the body. The process by which we adapt bodily control to life at sea is known as getting one's sea legs. We conducted the first experimental study of bodily control as maritime novices adapted to motion of a ship at sea. We evaluated postural activity (stance width, stance angle, and the kinematics of body sway) before and during a sea voyage. In addition, we evaluated the role of the visible horizon in the control of body sway. Finally, we related data on postural activity to two subjective experiences that are associated with sea travel; seasickness, and mal de debarquement. Our results revealed rapid changes in postural activity among novices at sea. Before the beginning of the voyage, the temporal dynamics of body sway differed among participants as a function of their (subsequent) severity of seasickness. Body sway measured at sea differed among participants as a function of their (subsequent) experience of mal de debarquement. We discuss implications of these results for general theories of the perception and control of bodily orientation, for the etiology of motion sickness, and for general phenomena of perceptual-motor adaptation and learning.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus