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Effects of Sex on Intra-Individual Variance in Urinary Solutes in Stone-Formers Collected from a Single Clinical Laboratory.

Perry GM, Scheinman SJ, Asplin JR - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: There was no effect of sex on CV for calcium (P>0.3).Males had higher CVs for citrate (P<0.01) from ages 16-45 and females higher CVs for citrate (P<0.01) from ages 56-80, suggesting effects of an extant oestral cycle on residual variance.Renal analysis might require explicit incorporation of heterogeneity among factorial effects, and for sex in particular.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Background/aims: Our work in a rodent model of urinary calcium suggests genetic and gender effects on increased residual variability in urine chemistries. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that sex would similarly be associated with residual variation in human urine solutes. Sex-related effects on residuals might affect the establishment of physiological baselines and error in medical assays.

Methods: We tested the effects of sex on residual variation in urine chemistry by estimating coefficients of variation (CV) for urinary solutes in paired sequential 24-h urines (≤72 hour interval) in 6,758 females and 9,024 males aged 16-80 submitted to a clinical laboratory.

Results: Females had higher CVs than males for urinary phosphorus overall at the False Discovery Rate (P<0.01). There was no effect of sex on CV for calcium (P>0.3). Males had higher CVs for citrate (P<0.01) from ages 16-45 and females higher CVs for citrate (P<0.01) from ages 56-80, suggesting effects of an extant oestral cycle on residual variance.

Conclusions: Our findings indicate the effects of sex on residual variance of the excretion of urinary solutes including phosphorus and citrate; differences in CV by sex might reflect dietary lability, differences in the fidelity of reporting or genetic differentiation in renal solute consistency. Such an effect could complicate medical analysis by the addition of random error to phenotypic assays. Renal analysis might require explicit incorporation of heterogeneity among factorial effects, and for sex in particular.

No MeSH data available.


Mean ranked coefficients of variation (CV) for citrate (Cit), chloride (Cl), potassium (K), magnesium (Mg) and phosphorus (P) in 4097 females (F) and 4014 males (M) in an approximate ‘menarche-menstrual’ (MM) period (ages 16–45) and in 1715 females and 3479 males in an approximate ‘postmenopausal’ group (PM) (ages 56–80).Significance of differences in CV by trait and age group (MM vs. PM) indicated as P<0.05*, P<0.01**.
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pone-0053637-g002: Mean ranked coefficients of variation (CV) for citrate (Cit), chloride (Cl), potassium (K), magnesium (Mg) and phosphorus (P) in 4097 females (F) and 4014 males (M) in an approximate ‘menarche-menstrual’ (MM) period (ages 16–45) and in 1715 females and 3479 males in an approximate ‘postmenopausal’ group (PM) (ages 56–80).Significance of differences in CV by trait and age group (MM vs. PM) indicated as P<0.05*, P<0.01**.

Mentions: A total of 4,128 males and 4,219 females from ages 16–45 and 3,578 male and 1,772 females were available. We detected marked changes in the pattern of male and female CVs in in the subdivided Model 1 for the examination of sex effects on variation at ages 16–45 and 56–80. Males had significantly higher from the ages of 16–45 years compared to females (P<0.01) and females significantly higher than males from 56–80 years at the FDR (P<0.01) (Table 2; Figure 2). From 16–45 years, males had significantly higher (P<0.01) at the nominal significance threshold but not after multiple correction.


Effects of Sex on Intra-Individual Variance in Urinary Solutes in Stone-Formers Collected from a Single Clinical Laboratory.

Perry GM, Scheinman SJ, Asplin JR - PLoS ONE (2013)

Mean ranked coefficients of variation (CV) for citrate (Cit), chloride (Cl), potassium (K), magnesium (Mg) and phosphorus (P) in 4097 females (F) and 4014 males (M) in an approximate ‘menarche-menstrual’ (MM) period (ages 16–45) and in 1715 females and 3479 males in an approximate ‘postmenopausal’ group (PM) (ages 56–80).Significance of differences in CV by trait and age group (MM vs. PM) indicated as P<0.05*, P<0.01**.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3686766&req=5

pone-0053637-g002: Mean ranked coefficients of variation (CV) for citrate (Cit), chloride (Cl), potassium (K), magnesium (Mg) and phosphorus (P) in 4097 females (F) and 4014 males (M) in an approximate ‘menarche-menstrual’ (MM) period (ages 16–45) and in 1715 females and 3479 males in an approximate ‘postmenopausal’ group (PM) (ages 56–80).Significance of differences in CV by trait and age group (MM vs. PM) indicated as P<0.05*, P<0.01**.
Mentions: A total of 4,128 males and 4,219 females from ages 16–45 and 3,578 male and 1,772 females were available. We detected marked changes in the pattern of male and female CVs in in the subdivided Model 1 for the examination of sex effects on variation at ages 16–45 and 56–80. Males had significantly higher from the ages of 16–45 years compared to females (P<0.01) and females significantly higher than males from 56–80 years at the FDR (P<0.01) (Table 2; Figure 2). From 16–45 years, males had significantly higher (P<0.01) at the nominal significance threshold but not after multiple correction.

Bottom Line: There was no effect of sex on CV for calcium (P>0.3).Males had higher CVs for citrate (P<0.01) from ages 16-45 and females higher CVs for citrate (P<0.01) from ages 56-80, suggesting effects of an extant oestral cycle on residual variance.Renal analysis might require explicit incorporation of heterogeneity among factorial effects, and for sex in particular.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Background/aims: Our work in a rodent model of urinary calcium suggests genetic and gender effects on increased residual variability in urine chemistries. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that sex would similarly be associated with residual variation in human urine solutes. Sex-related effects on residuals might affect the establishment of physiological baselines and error in medical assays.

Methods: We tested the effects of sex on residual variation in urine chemistry by estimating coefficients of variation (CV) for urinary solutes in paired sequential 24-h urines (≤72 hour interval) in 6,758 females and 9,024 males aged 16-80 submitted to a clinical laboratory.

Results: Females had higher CVs than males for urinary phosphorus overall at the False Discovery Rate (P<0.01). There was no effect of sex on CV for calcium (P>0.3). Males had higher CVs for citrate (P<0.01) from ages 16-45 and females higher CVs for citrate (P<0.01) from ages 56-80, suggesting effects of an extant oestral cycle on residual variance.

Conclusions: Our findings indicate the effects of sex on residual variance of the excretion of urinary solutes including phosphorus and citrate; differences in CV by sex might reflect dietary lability, differences in the fidelity of reporting or genetic differentiation in renal solute consistency. Such an effect could complicate medical analysis by the addition of random error to phenotypic assays. Renal analysis might require explicit incorporation of heterogeneity among factorial effects, and for sex in particular.

No MeSH data available.