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Alcohol Consumption, Types of Alcohol, and Parkinson's Disease.

Liu R, Guo X, Park Y, Wang J, Huang X, Hollenbeck A, Blair A, Chen H - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: Total alcohol consumption was not associated with PD.The results for wine consumption were less clear, although a borderline lower PD risk was observed when comparing wine drinkers of 1-1.99 drinks/day with none drinkers (OR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.53, 1.02).OUR RESULTS SUGGEST THAT BEER AND LIQUOR CONSUMPTION MAY HAVE OPPOSITE ASSOCIATIONS WITH PD: low to moderate beer consumption with lower PD risk and greater liquor consumption with higher risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Background: The epidemiologic evidence on alcohol consumption and Parkinson's disease (PD) is equivocal. We prospectively examined total alcohol consumption and consumption of specific types of alcoholic beverage in relation to future risk of PD.

Methods: The study comprised 306,895 participants (180,235 male and 126,660 female) ages 50-71 years in 1995-1996 from the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Consumption of alcoholic beverages in the past 12 months was assessed in 1995-1996. Multivariate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were obtained from logistic regression models.

Results: A total of 1,113 PD cases diagnosed between 2000 and 2006 were included in the analysis. Total alcohol consumption was not associated with PD. However, the association differed by types of alcoholic beverages. Compared with non-beer drinkers, the multivariate ORs for beer drinkers were 0.79 (95% CI: 0.68, 0.92) for <1 drink/day, 0.73 (95% CI: 0.50, 1.07) for 1-1.99 drinks/day, and 0.86 (95% CI: 0.60, 1.21) for ≥2 drinks/day. For liquor consumption, a monotonic increase in PD risk was suggested: ORs (95% CI) were 1.06 (0.91, 1.23), 1.22 (0.94, 1.58), and 1.35 (1.02, 1.80) for <1, 1-1.99, and ≥2 drinks/day, respectively (P for trend <0.03). Additional analyses among exclusive drinkers of one specific type of alcoholic beverage supported the robustness of these findings. The results for wine consumption were less clear, although a borderline lower PD risk was observed when comparing wine drinkers of 1-1.99 drinks/day with none drinkers (OR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.53, 1.02).

Conclusions: OUR RESULTS SUGGEST THAT BEER AND LIQUOR CONSUMPTION MAY HAVE OPPOSITE ASSOCIATIONS WITH PD: low to moderate beer consumption with lower PD risk and greater liquor consumption with higher risk. These findings and potential underlying mechanisms warrant further investigations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals of Parkinson’s disease according to beer and liquor consumption within subgroups, NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study, 1995–2006.† indicates p for interaction.
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pone-0066452-g001: Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals of Parkinson’s disease according to beer and liquor consumption within subgroups, NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study, 1995–2006.† indicates p for interaction.

Mentions: Finally, we conducted an exploratory analysis to examine whether the association between beer or liquor consumption and risk of PD was modified by age, sex, smoking status, and caffeine intake (Figure 1). Generally, the analyses revealed no clear effect modifications. Although a statistically significant interaction was found between beer consumption and smoking, no clear trends were observed. For liquor, a higher PD risk was observed with increasing liquor consumption for those aged 62.4 year and older than younger individuals (P for trend = 0.003). A marginal significant interaction (P = 0.055) was observed between gender and liquor consumption with a positive association in men (P for trend = 0.005) but not in women (P for trend = 0.1). Finally, visual inspections of the figure suggest that when stratified by caffeine intake, the association of beer or liquor with PD only exists among individuals with higher caffeine intake. However, the P for interaction was not statistically significant.


Alcohol Consumption, Types of Alcohol, and Parkinson's Disease.

Liu R, Guo X, Park Y, Wang J, Huang X, Hollenbeck A, Blair A, Chen H - PLoS ONE (2013)

Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals of Parkinson’s disease according to beer and liquor consumption within subgroups, NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study, 1995–2006.† indicates p for interaction.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3686735&req=5

pone-0066452-g001: Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals of Parkinson’s disease according to beer and liquor consumption within subgroups, NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study, 1995–2006.† indicates p for interaction.
Mentions: Finally, we conducted an exploratory analysis to examine whether the association between beer or liquor consumption and risk of PD was modified by age, sex, smoking status, and caffeine intake (Figure 1). Generally, the analyses revealed no clear effect modifications. Although a statistically significant interaction was found between beer consumption and smoking, no clear trends were observed. For liquor, a higher PD risk was observed with increasing liquor consumption for those aged 62.4 year and older than younger individuals (P for trend = 0.003). A marginal significant interaction (P = 0.055) was observed between gender and liquor consumption with a positive association in men (P for trend = 0.005) but not in women (P for trend = 0.1). Finally, visual inspections of the figure suggest that when stratified by caffeine intake, the association of beer or liquor with PD only exists among individuals with higher caffeine intake. However, the P for interaction was not statistically significant.

Bottom Line: Total alcohol consumption was not associated with PD.The results for wine consumption were less clear, although a borderline lower PD risk was observed when comparing wine drinkers of 1-1.99 drinks/day with none drinkers (OR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.53, 1.02).OUR RESULTS SUGGEST THAT BEER AND LIQUOR CONSUMPTION MAY HAVE OPPOSITE ASSOCIATIONS WITH PD: low to moderate beer consumption with lower PD risk and greater liquor consumption with higher risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Background: The epidemiologic evidence on alcohol consumption and Parkinson's disease (PD) is equivocal. We prospectively examined total alcohol consumption and consumption of specific types of alcoholic beverage in relation to future risk of PD.

Methods: The study comprised 306,895 participants (180,235 male and 126,660 female) ages 50-71 years in 1995-1996 from the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Consumption of alcoholic beverages in the past 12 months was assessed in 1995-1996. Multivariate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were obtained from logistic regression models.

Results: A total of 1,113 PD cases diagnosed between 2000 and 2006 were included in the analysis. Total alcohol consumption was not associated with PD. However, the association differed by types of alcoholic beverages. Compared with non-beer drinkers, the multivariate ORs for beer drinkers were 0.79 (95% CI: 0.68, 0.92) for <1 drink/day, 0.73 (95% CI: 0.50, 1.07) for 1-1.99 drinks/day, and 0.86 (95% CI: 0.60, 1.21) for ≥2 drinks/day. For liquor consumption, a monotonic increase in PD risk was suggested: ORs (95% CI) were 1.06 (0.91, 1.23), 1.22 (0.94, 1.58), and 1.35 (1.02, 1.80) for <1, 1-1.99, and ≥2 drinks/day, respectively (P for trend <0.03). Additional analyses among exclusive drinkers of one specific type of alcoholic beverage supported the robustness of these findings. The results for wine consumption were less clear, although a borderline lower PD risk was observed when comparing wine drinkers of 1-1.99 drinks/day with none drinkers (OR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.53, 1.02).

Conclusions: OUR RESULTS SUGGEST THAT BEER AND LIQUOR CONSUMPTION MAY HAVE OPPOSITE ASSOCIATIONS WITH PD: low to moderate beer consumption with lower PD risk and greater liquor consumption with higher risk. These findings and potential underlying mechanisms warrant further investigations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus