Limits...
Rapid Buildup of Genetic Diversity in Founder Populations of the Gynodioecious Plant Species Origanum vulgare after Semi-Natural Grassland Restoration.

Helsen K, Jacquemyn H, Hermy M, Vandepitte K, Honnay O - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: We compared the genetic diversity and differentiation of fourteen recent populations with that of thirteen old, putative source populations, and we evaluated the effects of spatial configuration of the populations on colonization patterns.We did not observe decreased genetic diversity in recent populations, or inflated genetic differentiation among them.Nevertheless, a significantly higher inbreeding coefficient was observed in recent populations, although this was not associated with negative fitness effects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Plant Conservation and Population Biology, Department of Biology, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.

ABSTRACT
In most landscapes the success of habitat restoration is largely dependent on spontaneous colonization of plant species. This colonization process, and the outcome of restoration practices, can only be considered successful if the genetic makeup of founding populations is not eroded through founder effects and subsequent genetic drift. Here we used 10 microsatellite markers to investigate the genetic effects of recent colonization of the long-lived gynodioecious species Origanum vulgare in restored semi-natural grassland patches. We compared the genetic diversity and differentiation of fourteen recent populations with that of thirteen old, putative source populations, and we evaluated the effects of spatial configuration of the populations on colonization patterns. We did not observe decreased genetic diversity in recent populations, or inflated genetic differentiation among them. Nevertheless, a significantly higher inbreeding coefficient was observed in recent populations, although this was not associated with negative fitness effects. Overall population genetic differentiation was low (FST = 0.040). Individuals of restored populations were assigned to on average 6.1 different source populations (likely following the 'migrant pool' model). Gene flow was, however, affected by the spatial configuration of the grasslands, with gene flow into the recent populations mainly originating from nearby source populations. This study demonstrates how spontaneous colonization after habitat restoration can lead to viable populations in a relatively short time, overcoming pronounced founder effects, when several source populations are nearby. Restored populations can therefore rapidly act as stepping stones and sources of genetic diversity, likely increasing overall metapopulation viability of the study species.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Study area in the Viroin valley.Figure visualises the sampled recent populations (grey) and old populations (black) of O. vulgare. Ancient (white) and restored (dotted) calcareous grasslands are visualised as well. Population codes correspond to those in table 1.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3686717&req=5

pone-0067255-g001: Study area in the Viroin valley.Figure visualises the sampled recent populations (grey) and old populations (black) of O. vulgare. Ancient (white) and restored (dotted) calcareous grasslands are visualised as well. Population codes correspond to those in table 1.

Mentions: In total, we randomly selected 27 populations: 14 populations were located in recently restored calcareous grasslands, and 13 populations in mature calcareous grasslands (Fig. 1). In the summer of 2011, leaf material of 20 randomly selected individuals per population was collected and dried on silica gel. For each population, population size and the percentage of female plants were determined by counting the number of female and hermaphroditic individuals. For the largest populations (>1500 individuals) only a part of the population was counted and an approximation of the total populations size was extrapolated from this counted subset. Seed material of 25 plants per population was collected in October of 2011 and pooled per sampling location. All necessary permits were obtained for the described study, which complied with all relevant regulations. Permit for fieldwork in the Viroin-Hermeton national park (Parc naturel Viroin-Hermeton) was obtained through Léon Woué, by the CNB (Société royale - Cercles des Naturalistes de Belgique).


Rapid Buildup of Genetic Diversity in Founder Populations of the Gynodioecious Plant Species Origanum vulgare after Semi-Natural Grassland Restoration.

Helsen K, Jacquemyn H, Hermy M, Vandepitte K, Honnay O - PLoS ONE (2013)

Study area in the Viroin valley.Figure visualises the sampled recent populations (grey) and old populations (black) of O. vulgare. Ancient (white) and restored (dotted) calcareous grasslands are visualised as well. Population codes correspond to those in table 1.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3686717&req=5

pone-0067255-g001: Study area in the Viroin valley.Figure visualises the sampled recent populations (grey) and old populations (black) of O. vulgare. Ancient (white) and restored (dotted) calcareous grasslands are visualised as well. Population codes correspond to those in table 1.
Mentions: In total, we randomly selected 27 populations: 14 populations were located in recently restored calcareous grasslands, and 13 populations in mature calcareous grasslands (Fig. 1). In the summer of 2011, leaf material of 20 randomly selected individuals per population was collected and dried on silica gel. For each population, population size and the percentage of female plants were determined by counting the number of female and hermaphroditic individuals. For the largest populations (>1500 individuals) only a part of the population was counted and an approximation of the total populations size was extrapolated from this counted subset. Seed material of 25 plants per population was collected in October of 2011 and pooled per sampling location. All necessary permits were obtained for the described study, which complied with all relevant regulations. Permit for fieldwork in the Viroin-Hermeton national park (Parc naturel Viroin-Hermeton) was obtained through Léon Woué, by the CNB (Société royale - Cercles des Naturalistes de Belgique).

Bottom Line: We compared the genetic diversity and differentiation of fourteen recent populations with that of thirteen old, putative source populations, and we evaluated the effects of spatial configuration of the populations on colonization patterns.We did not observe decreased genetic diversity in recent populations, or inflated genetic differentiation among them.Nevertheless, a significantly higher inbreeding coefficient was observed in recent populations, although this was not associated with negative fitness effects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Plant Conservation and Population Biology, Department of Biology, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.

ABSTRACT
In most landscapes the success of habitat restoration is largely dependent on spontaneous colonization of plant species. This colonization process, and the outcome of restoration practices, can only be considered successful if the genetic makeup of founding populations is not eroded through founder effects and subsequent genetic drift. Here we used 10 microsatellite markers to investigate the genetic effects of recent colonization of the long-lived gynodioecious species Origanum vulgare in restored semi-natural grassland patches. We compared the genetic diversity and differentiation of fourteen recent populations with that of thirteen old, putative source populations, and we evaluated the effects of spatial configuration of the populations on colonization patterns. We did not observe decreased genetic diversity in recent populations, or inflated genetic differentiation among them. Nevertheless, a significantly higher inbreeding coefficient was observed in recent populations, although this was not associated with negative fitness effects. Overall population genetic differentiation was low (FST = 0.040). Individuals of restored populations were assigned to on average 6.1 different source populations (likely following the 'migrant pool' model). Gene flow was, however, affected by the spatial configuration of the grasslands, with gene flow into the recent populations mainly originating from nearby source populations. This study demonstrates how spontaneous colonization after habitat restoration can lead to viable populations in a relatively short time, overcoming pronounced founder effects, when several source populations are nearby. Restored populations can therefore rapidly act as stepping stones and sources of genetic diversity, likely increasing overall metapopulation viability of the study species.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus