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Stress Impact on Resting State Brain Networks.

Soares JM, Sampaio A, Ferreira LM, Santos NC, Marques P, Marques F, Palha JA, Cerqueira JJ, Sousa N - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: Yet, so far, little is known about the effect of stress in the architecture of RSNs, both in resting state conditions or during shift to task performance.Importantly, stressed participants also evidenced impairments in the deactivation of resting state-networks when compared to controls.These results reveal that stress impacts on activation-deactivation pattern of RSNs, a finding that may underlie stress-induced changes in several dimensions of brain activity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Life and Health Sciences Research Institute (ICVS), School of Health Sciences, University of Minho, Campus Gualtar, Braga, Portugal ; ICVS/3B's - PT Government Associate Laboratory, Braga/GuimarĂ£es, Portugal ; Clinical Academic Center - Braga, Portugal.

ABSTRACT
Resting state brain networks (RSNs) are spatially distributed large-scale networks, evidenced by resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. Importantly, RSNs are implicated in several relevant brain functions and present abnormal functional patterns in many neuropsychiatric disorders, for which stress exposure is an established risk factor. Yet, so far, little is known about the effect of stress in the architecture of RSNs, both in resting state conditions or during shift to task performance. Herein we assessed the architecture of the RSNs using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in a cohort of participants exposed to prolonged stress (participants that had just finished their long period of preparation for the medical residence selection exam), and respective gender- and age-matched controls (medical students under normal academic activities). Analysis focused on the pattern of activity in resting state conditions and after deactivation. A volumetric estimation of the RSNs was also performed. Data shows that stressed participants displayed greater activation of the default mode (DMN), dorsal attention (DAN), ventral attention (VAN), sensorimotor (SMN), and primary visual (VN) networks than controls. Importantly, stressed participants also evidenced impairments in the deactivation of resting state-networks when compared to controls. These functional changes are paralleled by a constriction of the DMN that is in line with the pattern of brain atrophy observed after stress exposure. These results reveal that stress impacts on activation-deactivation pattern of RSNs, a finding that may underlie stress-induced changes in several dimensions of brain activity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Clinical characteristics of the cohort.(A): Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAS); Hamilton Depression Scale (HAD) and (B): Salivary Cortisol levels of the stressed and control groups. **P<0.01; *P<0.05.
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pone-0066500-g001: Clinical characteristics of the cohort.(A): Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAS); Hamilton Depression Scale (HAD) and (B): Salivary Cortisol levels of the stressed and control groups. **P<0.01; *P<0.05.

Mentions: Stress impact was confirmed in several dimensions: in the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS, Figure 1A; P<0.007) and in the Hamilton anxiety (HAS, Figure 1A; P<0.042) and depression scores (HAD, Figure 1A; P<0.001); finally, we found a significant increase in salivary cortisol levels in stressed participants (Figure 1B; P<0.042).


Stress Impact on Resting State Brain Networks.

Soares JM, Sampaio A, Ferreira LM, Santos NC, Marques P, Marques F, Palha JA, Cerqueira JJ, Sousa N - PLoS ONE (2013)

Clinical characteristics of the cohort.(A): Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAS); Hamilton Depression Scale (HAD) and (B): Salivary Cortisol levels of the stressed and control groups. **P<0.01; *P<0.05.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3686683&req=5

pone-0066500-g001: Clinical characteristics of the cohort.(A): Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAS); Hamilton Depression Scale (HAD) and (B): Salivary Cortisol levels of the stressed and control groups. **P<0.01; *P<0.05.
Mentions: Stress impact was confirmed in several dimensions: in the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS, Figure 1A; P<0.007) and in the Hamilton anxiety (HAS, Figure 1A; P<0.042) and depression scores (HAD, Figure 1A; P<0.001); finally, we found a significant increase in salivary cortisol levels in stressed participants (Figure 1B; P<0.042).

Bottom Line: Yet, so far, little is known about the effect of stress in the architecture of RSNs, both in resting state conditions or during shift to task performance.Importantly, stressed participants also evidenced impairments in the deactivation of resting state-networks when compared to controls.These results reveal that stress impacts on activation-deactivation pattern of RSNs, a finding that may underlie stress-induced changes in several dimensions of brain activity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Life and Health Sciences Research Institute (ICVS), School of Health Sciences, University of Minho, Campus Gualtar, Braga, Portugal ; ICVS/3B's - PT Government Associate Laboratory, Braga/GuimarĂ£es, Portugal ; Clinical Academic Center - Braga, Portugal.

ABSTRACT
Resting state brain networks (RSNs) are spatially distributed large-scale networks, evidenced by resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. Importantly, RSNs are implicated in several relevant brain functions and present abnormal functional patterns in many neuropsychiatric disorders, for which stress exposure is an established risk factor. Yet, so far, little is known about the effect of stress in the architecture of RSNs, both in resting state conditions or during shift to task performance. Herein we assessed the architecture of the RSNs using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in a cohort of participants exposed to prolonged stress (participants that had just finished their long period of preparation for the medical residence selection exam), and respective gender- and age-matched controls (medical students under normal academic activities). Analysis focused on the pattern of activity in resting state conditions and after deactivation. A volumetric estimation of the RSNs was also performed. Data shows that stressed participants displayed greater activation of the default mode (DMN), dorsal attention (DAN), ventral attention (VAN), sensorimotor (SMN), and primary visual (VN) networks than controls. Importantly, stressed participants also evidenced impairments in the deactivation of resting state-networks when compared to controls. These functional changes are paralleled by a constriction of the DMN that is in line with the pattern of brain atrophy observed after stress exposure. These results reveal that stress impacts on activation-deactivation pattern of RSNs, a finding that may underlie stress-induced changes in several dimensions of brain activity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus