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Guidelines and protocols for cardiovascular magnetic resonance in children and adults with congenital heart disease: SCMR expert consensus group on congenital heart disease.

Fratz S, Chung T, Greil GF, Samyn MM, Taylor AM, Valsangiacomo Buechel ER, Yoo SJ, Powell AJ - J Cardiovasc Magn Reson (2013)

Bottom Line: The first portion addresses preparation for the examination and safety issues, the second describes the primary techniques used in an examination, and the third provides disease-specific protocols.Variations in practice are highlighted and expert consensus recommendations are provided.Indications and appropriate use criteria for CMR examination are not specifically addressed.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatric Cardiology and Congenital Heart Disease, Deutsches Herzzentrum München (German Heart Center Munich) of the Technical University Munich, Munich, Germany. fratz@dhm.mhn.de

ABSTRACT
Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has taken on an increasingly important role in the diagnostic evaluation and pre-procedural planning for patients with congenital heart disease. This article provides guidelines for the performance of CMR in children and adults with congenital heart disease. The first portion addresses preparation for the examination and safety issues, the second describes the primary techniques used in an examination, and the third provides disease-specific protocols. Variations in practice are highlighted and expert consensus recommendations are provided. Indications and appropriate use criteria for CMR examination are not specifically addressed.

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Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography. 9-year-old patient with partially anomalous pulmonary venous return of the left upper pulmonary vein (arrow) to the leftward aspect of the left innominate vein. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiogram shown in a coronal plane using a sub-volume maximal intensity projection (A) and volume rendering (B).
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Figure 3: Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography. 9-year-old patient with partially anomalous pulmonary venous return of the left upper pulmonary vein (arrow) to the leftward aspect of the left innominate vein. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiogram shown in a coronal plane using a sub-volume maximal intensity projection (A) and volume rendering (B).

Mentions: Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) using an intravenously administered GBCA can produce a high-resolution, high-contrast three-dimensional (3D) dataset of the entire chest vasculature in a short scan time, typically less than 30 seconds (Figure 3). As CHD is frequently associated with abnormalities of the chest vasculature, this technique is often employed in both pre- and post-operative CMR imaging protocols. Studies demonstrating its utility and accuracy in patients with CHD have been published for examination of the aorta and its branches, pulmonary arteries, pulmonary veins, systemic veins, aortopulmonary and venous-venous collateral vessels, systemic-to-pulmonary artery shunts, conduits, and vascular grafts [29-34]. The 3D datasets generated by MRA are well-suited to volume rendered displays which can enhance understanding of complex spatial relationships and are more comprehensible to non-CMR specialists (Figure 3). Nevertheless, it is essential that the source data be carefully reviewed by the reporting physician as anatomic information may be omitted or distorted by the volume rendering algorithm.


Guidelines and protocols for cardiovascular magnetic resonance in children and adults with congenital heart disease: SCMR expert consensus group on congenital heart disease.

Fratz S, Chung T, Greil GF, Samyn MM, Taylor AM, Valsangiacomo Buechel ER, Yoo SJ, Powell AJ - J Cardiovasc Magn Reson (2013)

Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography. 9-year-old patient with partially anomalous pulmonary venous return of the left upper pulmonary vein (arrow) to the leftward aspect of the left innominate vein. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiogram shown in a coronal plane using a sub-volume maximal intensity projection (A) and volume rendering (B).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3686659&req=5

Figure 3: Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography. 9-year-old patient with partially anomalous pulmonary venous return of the left upper pulmonary vein (arrow) to the leftward aspect of the left innominate vein. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiogram shown in a coronal plane using a sub-volume maximal intensity projection (A) and volume rendering (B).
Mentions: Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) using an intravenously administered GBCA can produce a high-resolution, high-contrast three-dimensional (3D) dataset of the entire chest vasculature in a short scan time, typically less than 30 seconds (Figure 3). As CHD is frequently associated with abnormalities of the chest vasculature, this technique is often employed in both pre- and post-operative CMR imaging protocols. Studies demonstrating its utility and accuracy in patients with CHD have been published for examination of the aorta and its branches, pulmonary arteries, pulmonary veins, systemic veins, aortopulmonary and venous-venous collateral vessels, systemic-to-pulmonary artery shunts, conduits, and vascular grafts [29-34]. The 3D datasets generated by MRA are well-suited to volume rendered displays which can enhance understanding of complex spatial relationships and are more comprehensible to non-CMR specialists (Figure 3). Nevertheless, it is essential that the source data be carefully reviewed by the reporting physician as anatomic information may be omitted or distorted by the volume rendering algorithm.

Bottom Line: The first portion addresses preparation for the examination and safety issues, the second describes the primary techniques used in an examination, and the third provides disease-specific protocols.Variations in practice are highlighted and expert consensus recommendations are provided.Indications and appropriate use criteria for CMR examination are not specifically addressed.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatric Cardiology and Congenital Heart Disease, Deutsches Herzzentrum München (German Heart Center Munich) of the Technical University Munich, Munich, Germany. fratz@dhm.mhn.de

ABSTRACT
Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has taken on an increasingly important role in the diagnostic evaluation and pre-procedural planning for patients with congenital heart disease. This article provides guidelines for the performance of CMR in children and adults with congenital heart disease. The first portion addresses preparation for the examination and safety issues, the second describes the primary techniques used in an examination, and the third provides disease-specific protocols. Variations in practice are highlighted and expert consensus recommendations are provided. Indications and appropriate use criteria for CMR examination are not specifically addressed.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus