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Anti-müllerian hormone is not associated with cardiometabolic risk factors in adolescent females.

Anderson EL, Fraser A, McNally W, Sattar N, Lashen H, Fleming R, Nelson SM, Lawlor DA - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: For females classified as post-pubertal (n = 848) at the time of assessment median (IQR) AMH was 3.81 ng/ml (2.55, 5.82) compared with 3.25 ng/ml (2.23, 5.05) in those classed as early pubertal (n = 460, P≤0.001).For example fasting insulin changed by 0% per doubling of AMH (95%CI: -3%,+2%) p  = 0.70, with identical results if HOMA-IR was used.Our results suggest that in healthy adolescent females, AMH is not associated with cardiometabolic risk factors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MRC CAiTE Centre, University of Bristol, Oakfield House, Oakfield Grove, Bristol, United Kingdom. emma.louise.anderson@bristol.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Epidemiological evidence for associations of Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) with cardiometabolic risk factors is lacking. Existing evidence comes from small studies in select adult populations, and findings are conflicting. We aimed to assess whether AMH is associated with cardiometabolic risk factors in a general population of adolescent females.

Methods: AMH, fasting insulin, glucose, HDLc, LDLc, triglycerides and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured at a mean age 15.5 years in 1,308 female participants in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). Multivariable linear regression was used to examine associations of AMH with these cardiometabolic outcomes.

Results: AMH values ranged from 0.16-35.84 ng/ml and median AMH was 3.57 ng/ml (IQR: 2.41, 5.49). For females classified as post-pubertal (n = 848) at the time of assessment median (IQR) AMH was 3.81 ng/ml (2.55, 5.82) compared with 3.25 ng/ml (2.23, 5.05) in those classed as early pubertal (n = 460, P≤0.001). After adjusting for birth weight, gestational age, pubertal stage, age, ethnicity, socioeconomic position, adiposity and use of hormonal contraceptives, there were no associations with any of the cardiometabolic outcomes. For example fasting insulin changed by 0% per doubling of AMH (95%CI: -3%,+2%) p  = 0.70, with identical results if HOMA-IR was used. Results were similar after additional adjustment for smoking, physical activity and age at menarche, after exclusion of 3% of females with the highest AMH values, after excluding those that had not started menarche and after excluding those using hormonal contraceptives.

Conclusion: Our results suggest that in healthy adolescent females, AMH is not associated with cardiometabolic risk factors.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Participant flow through the study.*Participants who had withdrawn, were lost to follow-up or had died were not invited.
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pone-0064510-g001: Participant flow through the study.*Participants who had withdrawn, were lost to follow-up or had died were not invited.

Mentions: The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children is a population-based, prospective birth cohort, investigating factors that affect the health and development of children. Detailed methods of ALSPAC have been described previously, [38], [39] and are on the study website (www.alspac.bris.ac.uk). Briefly, 14,541 pregnant women resident in the Bristol area with an expected date of delivery between 1st April 1991 and 31st December 1992 were enrolled into the cohort, and of these, 13,988 had a live-born child who was still alive at age 1 year. Participants who attended the 15 year follow-up clinic and who had data on AMH were eligible for inclusion in our study (n = 1,781). Our study sample consists of 1,308 female adolescents (13 sets of twins) who had complete data on AMH, cardiometabolic outcomes and all potential confounders (see Figure 1). Ethical approval was obtained from the ALSPAC Law and Ethics committee and relevant local ethics committees in line with the Declaration of Helsinki, and written informed consent was provided by all participants.


Anti-müllerian hormone is not associated with cardiometabolic risk factors in adolescent females.

Anderson EL, Fraser A, McNally W, Sattar N, Lashen H, Fleming R, Nelson SM, Lawlor DA - PLoS ONE (2013)

Participant flow through the study.*Participants who had withdrawn, were lost to follow-up or had died were not invited.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3675909&req=5

pone-0064510-g001: Participant flow through the study.*Participants who had withdrawn, were lost to follow-up or had died were not invited.
Mentions: The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children is a population-based, prospective birth cohort, investigating factors that affect the health and development of children. Detailed methods of ALSPAC have been described previously, [38], [39] and are on the study website (www.alspac.bris.ac.uk). Briefly, 14,541 pregnant women resident in the Bristol area with an expected date of delivery between 1st April 1991 and 31st December 1992 were enrolled into the cohort, and of these, 13,988 had a live-born child who was still alive at age 1 year. Participants who attended the 15 year follow-up clinic and who had data on AMH were eligible for inclusion in our study (n = 1,781). Our study sample consists of 1,308 female adolescents (13 sets of twins) who had complete data on AMH, cardiometabolic outcomes and all potential confounders (see Figure 1). Ethical approval was obtained from the ALSPAC Law and Ethics committee and relevant local ethics committees in line with the Declaration of Helsinki, and written informed consent was provided by all participants.

Bottom Line: For females classified as post-pubertal (n = 848) at the time of assessment median (IQR) AMH was 3.81 ng/ml (2.55, 5.82) compared with 3.25 ng/ml (2.23, 5.05) in those classed as early pubertal (n = 460, P≤0.001).For example fasting insulin changed by 0% per doubling of AMH (95%CI: -3%,+2%) p  = 0.70, with identical results if HOMA-IR was used.Our results suggest that in healthy adolescent females, AMH is not associated with cardiometabolic risk factors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MRC CAiTE Centre, University of Bristol, Oakfield House, Oakfield Grove, Bristol, United Kingdom. emma.louise.anderson@bristol.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Epidemiological evidence for associations of Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) with cardiometabolic risk factors is lacking. Existing evidence comes from small studies in select adult populations, and findings are conflicting. We aimed to assess whether AMH is associated with cardiometabolic risk factors in a general population of adolescent females.

Methods: AMH, fasting insulin, glucose, HDLc, LDLc, triglycerides and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured at a mean age 15.5 years in 1,308 female participants in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). Multivariable linear regression was used to examine associations of AMH with these cardiometabolic outcomes.

Results: AMH values ranged from 0.16-35.84 ng/ml and median AMH was 3.57 ng/ml (IQR: 2.41, 5.49). For females classified as post-pubertal (n = 848) at the time of assessment median (IQR) AMH was 3.81 ng/ml (2.55, 5.82) compared with 3.25 ng/ml (2.23, 5.05) in those classed as early pubertal (n = 460, P≤0.001). After adjusting for birth weight, gestational age, pubertal stage, age, ethnicity, socioeconomic position, adiposity and use of hormonal contraceptives, there were no associations with any of the cardiometabolic outcomes. For example fasting insulin changed by 0% per doubling of AMH (95%CI: -3%,+2%) p  = 0.70, with identical results if HOMA-IR was used. Results were similar after additional adjustment for smoking, physical activity and age at menarche, after exclusion of 3% of females with the highest AMH values, after excluding those that had not started menarche and after excluding those using hormonal contraceptives.

Conclusion: Our results suggest that in healthy adolescent females, AMH is not associated with cardiometabolic risk factors.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus