Limits...
Multimodal snapshot spectral imaging for oral cancer diagnostics: a pilot study.

Bedard N, Schwarz RA, Hu A, Bhattar V, Howe J, Williams MD, Gillenwater AM, Richards-Kortum R, Tkaczyk TS - Biomed Opt Express (2013)

Bottom Line: Optical imaging and spectroscopy have emerged as effective tools for detecting malignant changes associated with oral cancer.While clinical studies have demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity for detection, current devices either interrogate a small region or can have reduced performance for some benign lesions.The portable device can stream RGB images at 7.2 frames per second and record both autofluorescence and reflectance spectral datacubes in < 1 second.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, Houston, TX 77005, USA.

ABSTRACT
Optical imaging and spectroscopy have emerged as effective tools for detecting malignant changes associated with oral cancer. While clinical studies have demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity for detection, current devices either interrogate a small region or can have reduced performance for some benign lesions. We describe a snapshot imaging spectrometer that combines the large field-of-view of widefield imaging with the diagnostic strength of spectroscopy. The portable device can stream RGB images at 7.2 frames per second and record both autofluorescence and reflectance spectral datacubes in < 1 second. We report initial data from normal volunteers and oral cancer patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of average spectra for different histopathological diagnoses. Data is shown for snapshot spectral imaging (left) and point spectroscopy from a previous clinical trial of 408 sites (right). All sites were nonkeratinized.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3675872&req=5

g004: Comparison of average spectra for different histopathological diagnoses. Data is shown for snapshot spectral imaging (left) and point spectroscopy from a previous clinical trial of 408 sites (right). All sites were nonkeratinized.

Mentions: Spectral trends from IMS measurements were analyzed by categorizing spectra based on clinical impression and histopathological diagnosis. First, a region of interest for each biopsy site (i.e. white circle in Figs. 2 and 3) was selected on the reflectance true-color images by the surgeon. The average autofluorescence and reflectance spectra were then calculated for pixels contained within the biopsy region. Next, a pathologist classified each biopsy according to the worst pathological grade; in cases where a biopsy and surgical specimen were obtained, the worst pathological grade was selected. Finally, the spectra from biopsy sites of three histopathological grades (normal, dysplasia, and cancer) were averaged. Figure 4Fig. 4


Multimodal snapshot spectral imaging for oral cancer diagnostics: a pilot study.

Bedard N, Schwarz RA, Hu A, Bhattar V, Howe J, Williams MD, Gillenwater AM, Richards-Kortum R, Tkaczyk TS - Biomed Opt Express (2013)

Comparison of average spectra for different histopathological diagnoses. Data is shown for snapshot spectral imaging (left) and point spectroscopy from a previous clinical trial of 408 sites (right). All sites were nonkeratinized.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3675872&req=5

g004: Comparison of average spectra for different histopathological diagnoses. Data is shown for snapshot spectral imaging (left) and point spectroscopy from a previous clinical trial of 408 sites (right). All sites were nonkeratinized.
Mentions: Spectral trends from IMS measurements were analyzed by categorizing spectra based on clinical impression and histopathological diagnosis. First, a region of interest for each biopsy site (i.e. white circle in Figs. 2 and 3) was selected on the reflectance true-color images by the surgeon. The average autofluorescence and reflectance spectra were then calculated for pixels contained within the biopsy region. Next, a pathologist classified each biopsy according to the worst pathological grade; in cases where a biopsy and surgical specimen were obtained, the worst pathological grade was selected. Finally, the spectra from biopsy sites of three histopathological grades (normal, dysplasia, and cancer) were averaged. Figure 4Fig. 4

Bottom Line: Optical imaging and spectroscopy have emerged as effective tools for detecting malignant changes associated with oral cancer.While clinical studies have demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity for detection, current devices either interrogate a small region or can have reduced performance for some benign lesions.The portable device can stream RGB images at 7.2 frames per second and record both autofluorescence and reflectance spectral datacubes in < 1 second.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, Houston, TX 77005, USA.

ABSTRACT
Optical imaging and spectroscopy have emerged as effective tools for detecting malignant changes associated with oral cancer. While clinical studies have demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity for detection, current devices either interrogate a small region or can have reduced performance for some benign lesions. We describe a snapshot imaging spectrometer that combines the large field-of-view of widefield imaging with the diagnostic strength of spectroscopy. The portable device can stream RGB images at 7.2 frames per second and record both autofluorescence and reflectance spectral datacubes in < 1 second. We report initial data from normal volunteers and oral cancer patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus