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Positive involuntary autobiographical memories: you first have to live them.

Clark IA, Mackay CE, Holmes EA - Conscious Cogn (2013)

Bottom Line: In spite of this, surprisingly little is known about how such positive IAMs arise.The current study is the first to investigate which variables (emotional reaction to the film; recognition memory of the film; participant characteristics) would best predict the frequency of positive IAMs. Higher levels of positive mood change to the film were significantly associated with the number of positive IAMs recorded in the subsequent week.Results demonstrate the importance of positive emotional reaction at the time of an event for subsequent positive IAMs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, United Kingdom. ian.clark@psych.ox.ac.uk

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Diagram showing the experimental procedure. Participants filled out questionnaires concerning their current mood and baseline characteristics before watching the positive film. After film viewing mood was reassessed and participants were asked to record any involuntary memories of the film over the following week. Participants returned a week later and completed a recognition memory test of the film.
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f0005: Diagram showing the experimental procedure. Participants filled out questionnaires concerning their current mood and baseline characteristics before watching the positive film. After film viewing mood was reassessed and participants were asked to record any involuntary memories of the film over the following week. Participants returned a week later and completed a recognition memory test of the film.

Mentions: The sample consisted of 95 participants (53 female) with a mean age of 23.45 years (SD = 7.0). On arrival, participants were asked to complete questionnaires concerning their current mood and baseline characteristics (Section 2.2). Participants were then asked to watch the positive film, imagining that the events being depicted were happening to them right now. After film viewing, participants’ mood was reassessed and they were asked to record any IAMs of the film in a 1-week diary (Holmes et al., 2004). Participants returned after one week and completed a recognition memory test of the film (Fig. 1).


Positive involuntary autobiographical memories: you first have to live them.

Clark IA, Mackay CE, Holmes EA - Conscious Cogn (2013)

Diagram showing the experimental procedure. Participants filled out questionnaires concerning their current mood and baseline characteristics before watching the positive film. After film viewing mood was reassessed and participants were asked to record any involuntary memories of the film over the following week. Participants returned a week later and completed a recognition memory test of the film.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3675682&req=5

f0005: Diagram showing the experimental procedure. Participants filled out questionnaires concerning their current mood and baseline characteristics before watching the positive film. After film viewing mood was reassessed and participants were asked to record any involuntary memories of the film over the following week. Participants returned a week later and completed a recognition memory test of the film.
Mentions: The sample consisted of 95 participants (53 female) with a mean age of 23.45 years (SD = 7.0). On arrival, participants were asked to complete questionnaires concerning their current mood and baseline characteristics (Section 2.2). Participants were then asked to watch the positive film, imagining that the events being depicted were happening to them right now. After film viewing, participants’ mood was reassessed and they were asked to record any IAMs of the film in a 1-week diary (Holmes et al., 2004). Participants returned after one week and completed a recognition memory test of the film (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: In spite of this, surprisingly little is known about how such positive IAMs arise.The current study is the first to investigate which variables (emotional reaction to the film; recognition memory of the film; participant characteristics) would best predict the frequency of positive IAMs. Higher levels of positive mood change to the film were significantly associated with the number of positive IAMs recorded in the subsequent week.Results demonstrate the importance of positive emotional reaction at the time of an event for subsequent positive IAMs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, United Kingdom. ian.clark@psych.ox.ac.uk

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus