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Assessing the Potentialities of FORMOSAT-2 Data for Water and Crop Monitoring at Small Regional Scale in South-Eastern France

View Article: PubMed Central

ABSTRACT

Water monitoring at the scale of a small agricultural region is a key point to insure a good crop development particularly in South-Eastern France, where extreme climatic conditions result in long dry periods in spring and summer with very sparse precipitation events, corresponding to a crucial period of crop development. Remote sensing with the increasing imagery resolution is a useful tool to provide information on plant water status over various temporal and spatial scales. The current study focussed on assessing the potentialities of FORMOSAT-2 data, characterized by high spatial (8m pixel) and temporal resolutions (1-3 day/time revisit), to improve crop modeling and spatial estimation of the main land properties. Thirty cloud free images were acquired from March to October 2006 over a small region called Crau-Camargue in SE France, while numerous ground measurements were performed simultaneously over various crop types. We have compared two models simulating energy transfers between soil, vegetation and atmosphere: SEBAL and PBLs. Maps of evapotranspiration were analyzed according to the agricultural practices at field scale. These practices were well identified from FORMOSAT-2 images, which provided accurate input surface parameters to the SVAT models.

No MeSH data available.


Localisation of the study area (‘Crau-Camargue’ region) and the track of FORMOSAT-2 image, with the main cover types indicated on a true color image.
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f1-sensors-08-03460: Localisation of the study area (‘Crau-Camargue’ region) and the track of FORMOSAT-2 image, with the main cover types indicated on a true color image.

Mentions: Describing soil - vegetation - atmosphere transfers is of prime interest for understanding interactions and feedbacks between vegetation and boundary layer, and assessing plant water status [1]. This is gaining importance over these last years in the context of climatic changes, because land use evolution can induce significant modifications of surface fluxes like evapotranspiration, and therefore result in different irrigation strategies. The Crau-Camargue region located in South-Eastern France (Figure 1) is an interesting study case, particularly sensitive to global changes. It is a flat region characterized by highly contrasted humid areas, with a high diversity of crops and agricultural practices. The Crau region is famous for irrigated meadows providing COP (Certified Origin Product) hay exported all over the world. While the Camargue region is known for its rice fields that were initially cultivated for soil salinity remediation purposes [2]. Significant modifications have been noticed these last 10 years. Climatic hazards such as long and dry spring periods and heavy rains in autumn are becoming more frequent. Consequently, the increasing water scarcity during the growing season, in addition to water redistribution for the industrial and urban sectors, has led the authorities to restrict irrigation. Irrigated crops like meadow, which are dominant in the Crau region, were affected by those restrictions. Other crops such as corn, demanding large water quantity during summer period, disappear progressively of the cultural landscape. Moreover, rice plantations in Camargue show large differences in yields (mainly due to the various cultural practices performed in terms of sowing dates, submersion dates after sowing and drying up dates before harvesting [2]). It is therefore important to estimate with accuracy this surface variability, to know the real water need for each field so as to improve crop and water management.


Assessing the Potentialities of FORMOSAT-2 Data for Water and Crop Monitoring at Small Regional Scale in South-Eastern France
Localisation of the study area (‘Crau-Camargue’ region) and the track of FORMOSAT-2 image, with the main cover types indicated on a true color image.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3675555&req=5

f1-sensors-08-03460: Localisation of the study area (‘Crau-Camargue’ region) and the track of FORMOSAT-2 image, with the main cover types indicated on a true color image.
Mentions: Describing soil - vegetation - atmosphere transfers is of prime interest for understanding interactions and feedbacks between vegetation and boundary layer, and assessing plant water status [1]. This is gaining importance over these last years in the context of climatic changes, because land use evolution can induce significant modifications of surface fluxes like evapotranspiration, and therefore result in different irrigation strategies. The Crau-Camargue region located in South-Eastern France (Figure 1) is an interesting study case, particularly sensitive to global changes. It is a flat region characterized by highly contrasted humid areas, with a high diversity of crops and agricultural practices. The Crau region is famous for irrigated meadows providing COP (Certified Origin Product) hay exported all over the world. While the Camargue region is known for its rice fields that were initially cultivated for soil salinity remediation purposes [2]. Significant modifications have been noticed these last 10 years. Climatic hazards such as long and dry spring periods and heavy rains in autumn are becoming more frequent. Consequently, the increasing water scarcity during the growing season, in addition to water redistribution for the industrial and urban sectors, has led the authorities to restrict irrigation. Irrigated crops like meadow, which are dominant in the Crau region, were affected by those restrictions. Other crops such as corn, demanding large water quantity during summer period, disappear progressively of the cultural landscape. Moreover, rice plantations in Camargue show large differences in yields (mainly due to the various cultural practices performed in terms of sowing dates, submersion dates after sowing and drying up dates before harvesting [2]). It is therefore important to estimate with accuracy this surface variability, to know the real water need for each field so as to improve crop and water management.

View Article: PubMed Central

ABSTRACT

Water monitoring at the scale of a small agricultural region is a key point to insure a good crop development particularly in South-Eastern France, where extreme climatic conditions result in long dry periods in spring and summer with very sparse precipitation events, corresponding to a crucial period of crop development. Remote sensing with the increasing imagery resolution is a useful tool to provide information on plant water status over various temporal and spatial scales. The current study focussed on assessing the potentialities of FORMOSAT-2 data, characterized by high spatial (8m pixel) and temporal resolutions (1-3 day/time revisit), to improve crop modeling and spatial estimation of the main land properties. Thirty cloud free images were acquired from March to October 2006 over a small region called Crau-Camargue in SE France, while numerous ground measurements were performed simultaneously over various crop types. We have compared two models simulating energy transfers between soil, vegetation and atmosphere: SEBAL and PBLs. Maps of evapotranspiration were analyzed according to the agricultural practices at field scale. These practices were well identified from FORMOSAT-2 images, which provided accurate input surface parameters to the SVAT models.

No MeSH data available.