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Implantable Microimagers

View Article: PubMed Central

ABSTRACT

Implantable devices such as cardiac pacemakers, drug-delivery systems, and defibrillators have had a tremendous impact on the quality of live for many disabled people. To date, many devices have been developed for implantation into various parts of the human body. In this paper, we focus on devices implanted in the head. In particular, we describe the technologies necessary to create implantable microimagers. Design, fabrication, and implementation issues are discussed vis-à-vis two examples of implantable microimagers; the retinal prosthesis and in vivo neuro-microimager. Testing of these devices in animals verify the use of the microimagers in the implanted state. We believe that further advancement of these devices will lead to the development of a new method for medical and scientific applications.

No MeSH data available.


(a) Fluorescence images captured after high frequency theta-burst stimulation in the hippocampus showing increase in protease activity. (b) Electric field potential recordings at various stimulation current strength by using the on-chip Pt electrodes.
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f13-sensors-08-03183: (a) Fluorescence images captured after high frequency theta-burst stimulation in the hippocampus showing increase in protease activity. (b) Electric field potential recordings at various stimulation current strength by using the on-chip Pt electrodes.

Mentions: An experiment was performed to verify fluorescence imaging in vivo using the packaged module. In the experiment Boc-Val-Pro-Arg-4-methylcoumarin-7-amide (VPR-MCA), a fluorescence substrate was first injected into the hippocampus. Using a syringe pump, 2 mM of VPR-MCA in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) was injected at 0.08 ml/min for 20 min. A high frequency pulse train (theta-burst) stimulation was then applied through the electrodes. This caused a chain of chemical response which leads to extracellular expression of neuropsin, a serine protease linked to the learning and memory processes in the brain. The serine protease reacts with the fluorescence substrate to release the bound fluorophore molecule. When illuminated by excitation light from the LEDs the molecule emit fluoresce light which were captured by the device as shown in Figure. 13 (a).


Implantable Microimagers
(a) Fluorescence images captured after high frequency theta-burst stimulation in the hippocampus showing increase in protease activity. (b) Electric field potential recordings at various stimulation current strength by using the on-chip Pt electrodes.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3675539&req=5

f13-sensors-08-03183: (a) Fluorescence images captured after high frequency theta-burst stimulation in the hippocampus showing increase in protease activity. (b) Electric field potential recordings at various stimulation current strength by using the on-chip Pt electrodes.
Mentions: An experiment was performed to verify fluorescence imaging in vivo using the packaged module. In the experiment Boc-Val-Pro-Arg-4-methylcoumarin-7-amide (VPR-MCA), a fluorescence substrate was first injected into the hippocampus. Using a syringe pump, 2 mM of VPR-MCA in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) was injected at 0.08 ml/min for 20 min. A high frequency pulse train (theta-burst) stimulation was then applied through the electrodes. This caused a chain of chemical response which leads to extracellular expression of neuropsin, a serine protease linked to the learning and memory processes in the brain. The serine protease reacts with the fluorescence substrate to release the bound fluorophore molecule. When illuminated by excitation light from the LEDs the molecule emit fluoresce light which were captured by the device as shown in Figure. 13 (a).

View Article: PubMed Central

ABSTRACT

Implantable devices such as cardiac pacemakers, drug-delivery systems, and defibrillators have had a tremendous impact on the quality of live for many disabled people. To date, many devices have been developed for implantation into various parts of the human body. In this paper, we focus on devices implanted in the head. In particular, we describe the technologies necessary to create implantable microimagers. Design, fabrication, and implementation issues are discussed vis-à-vis two examples of implantable microimagers; the retinal prosthesis and in vivo neuro-microimager. Testing of these devices in animals verify the use of the microimagers in the implanted state. We believe that further advancement of these devices will lead to the development of a new method for medical and scientific applications.

No MeSH data available.