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Shear bond strength of resin cement to an acid etched and a laser irradiated ceramic surface.

Kursoglu P, Motro PF, Yurdaguven H - J Adv Prosthodont (2013)

Bottom Line: Their surfaces were finished with 1000-grit silicon carbide paper.Bonded specimens were stored in distilled water at 37℃ for 24 hours.No significant difference was observed between Group 4 (3.59 ± 1.19 MPa) and Control group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Yeditepe University, Istanbul, Turkey.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To evaluate the effects of hydrofluoric acid etching and Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation on the shear bond strength of resin cement to lithium disilicate ceramic.

Materials and methods: Fifty-five ceramic blocks (5 mm × 5 mm × 2 mm) were fabricated and embedded in acrylic resin. Their surfaces were finished with 1000-grit silicon carbide paper. The blocks were assigned to five groups: 1) 9.5% hydrofluoric-acid etching for 60 s; 2-4), 1.5-, 2.5-, and 6-W Er,Cr:YSGG laser applications for 60 seconds, respectively; and 5) no treatment (control). One specimen from each group was examined using scanning electron microscopy. Ceramic primer (Rely X ceramic primer) and adhesive (Adper Single Bond) were applied to the ceramic surfaces, followed by resin cement to bond the composite cylinders, and light curing. Bonded specimens were stored in distilled water at 37℃ for 24 hours. Shear bond strengths were determined by a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests (α=0.05).

Results: Adhesion was significantly stronger in Group 2 (3.88 ± 1.94 MPa) and Group 3 (3.65 ± 1.87 MPa) than in Control group (1.95 ± 1.06 MPa), in which bonding values were lowest (P<.01). No significant difference was observed between Group 4 (3.59 ± 1.19 MPa) and Control group. Shear bond strength was highest in Group 1 (8.42 ± 1.86 MPa; P<.01).

Conclusion: Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation at 1.5 and 2.5 W increased shear bond strengths between ceramic and resin cement compared with untreated ceramic surfaces. Irradiation at 6 W may not be an efficient ceramic surface treatment technique.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Demostration of the composite cylinder bonding to the ceramic.
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Figure 1: Demostration of the composite cylinder bonding to the ceramic.

Mentions: After surface treatment, a ceramic primer (Rely X; Lot #2721; 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) was applied to the ceramic surfaces allowed to evaporate for 3 minutes and air-dried for 30 seconds. Then, an adhesive (Adper Single Bond; Lot #1122; 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) was applied to the ceramic surfaces and air dried to achieve thinning without light curing, according to the manufacturer's instructions. To standardize the areas subjected to resin cement bonding, a perforated sticker (3 mm diameter) was placed in the center of each specimen (Fig. 1). Cylindrical composite resin blocks (3 mm diameter, 4 mm length; Filtek Z250, Lot #6020A2; 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) were created using a transparent rubber ring mold and then bonded to the ceramic surfaces under consistent pressure by the same operator with a resin luting cement (Rely X ARC, Lot #CPCY; 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA). Care was taken to position the resin blocks on the intact ceramic surfaces, and excess resin cement was removed with an explorer before light curing for 40 seconds (Elipar Freelight 2; 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA). The stickers were then removed carefully from the ceramic surfaces. Polymerization was performed for 20 seconds and distrubed equally around the circumference of each composite resin cylinder. The bonded specimens were stored for 24 hours at 37℃ in distilled water in an incubator (UM 400; Memmert GmbH, Schwabach, Germany). Shear bond strength was then tested using a universal testing machine (Model 3345; Instron, Norwood, MA, USA) at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. One specimen from each group was examined by SEM (JSM-6335; JEOL, Tokyo, Japan) to assess the surface texture.


Shear bond strength of resin cement to an acid etched and a laser irradiated ceramic surface.

Kursoglu P, Motro PF, Yurdaguven H - J Adv Prosthodont (2013)

Demostration of the composite cylinder bonding to the ceramic.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3675300&req=5

Figure 1: Demostration of the composite cylinder bonding to the ceramic.
Mentions: After surface treatment, a ceramic primer (Rely X; Lot #2721; 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) was applied to the ceramic surfaces allowed to evaporate for 3 minutes and air-dried for 30 seconds. Then, an adhesive (Adper Single Bond; Lot #1122; 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) was applied to the ceramic surfaces and air dried to achieve thinning without light curing, according to the manufacturer's instructions. To standardize the areas subjected to resin cement bonding, a perforated sticker (3 mm diameter) was placed in the center of each specimen (Fig. 1). Cylindrical composite resin blocks (3 mm diameter, 4 mm length; Filtek Z250, Lot #6020A2; 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) were created using a transparent rubber ring mold and then bonded to the ceramic surfaces under consistent pressure by the same operator with a resin luting cement (Rely X ARC, Lot #CPCY; 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA). Care was taken to position the resin blocks on the intact ceramic surfaces, and excess resin cement was removed with an explorer before light curing for 40 seconds (Elipar Freelight 2; 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA). The stickers were then removed carefully from the ceramic surfaces. Polymerization was performed for 20 seconds and distrubed equally around the circumference of each composite resin cylinder. The bonded specimens were stored for 24 hours at 37℃ in distilled water in an incubator (UM 400; Memmert GmbH, Schwabach, Germany). Shear bond strength was then tested using a universal testing machine (Model 3345; Instron, Norwood, MA, USA) at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. One specimen from each group was examined by SEM (JSM-6335; JEOL, Tokyo, Japan) to assess the surface texture.

Bottom Line: Their surfaces were finished with 1000-grit silicon carbide paper.Bonded specimens were stored in distilled water at 37℃ for 24 hours.No significant difference was observed between Group 4 (3.59 ± 1.19 MPa) and Control group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Yeditepe University, Istanbul, Turkey.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To evaluate the effects of hydrofluoric acid etching and Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation on the shear bond strength of resin cement to lithium disilicate ceramic.

Materials and methods: Fifty-five ceramic blocks (5 mm × 5 mm × 2 mm) were fabricated and embedded in acrylic resin. Their surfaces were finished with 1000-grit silicon carbide paper. The blocks were assigned to five groups: 1) 9.5% hydrofluoric-acid etching for 60 s; 2-4), 1.5-, 2.5-, and 6-W Er,Cr:YSGG laser applications for 60 seconds, respectively; and 5) no treatment (control). One specimen from each group was examined using scanning electron microscopy. Ceramic primer (Rely X ceramic primer) and adhesive (Adper Single Bond) were applied to the ceramic surfaces, followed by resin cement to bond the composite cylinders, and light curing. Bonded specimens were stored in distilled water at 37℃ for 24 hours. Shear bond strengths were determined by a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests (α=0.05).

Results: Adhesion was significantly stronger in Group 2 (3.88 ± 1.94 MPa) and Group 3 (3.65 ± 1.87 MPa) than in Control group (1.95 ± 1.06 MPa), in which bonding values were lowest (P<.01). No significant difference was observed between Group 4 (3.59 ± 1.19 MPa) and Control group. Shear bond strength was highest in Group 1 (8.42 ± 1.86 MPa; P<.01).

Conclusion: Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation at 1.5 and 2.5 W increased shear bond strengths between ceramic and resin cement compared with untreated ceramic surfaces. Irradiation at 6 W may not be an efficient ceramic surface treatment technique.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus