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MRI characteristics of cysts and "cyst-like" lesions in and around the knee: what the radiologist needs to know.

Perdikakis E, Skiadas V - Insights Imaging (2013)

Bottom Line: A variety of benign cystic or "cyst-like" lesions may be encountered during a routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee.In addition, normal anatomic bursae and recesses may be misdiagnosed as an intra-articular cystic lesion when they are distended.However, the majority of the aforementioned lesions have characteristic MR appearances that allow a confident diagnosis, thus obviating the need for additional imaging or interventional procedures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, 412 General Military Hospital-212 Mobile Army Surgical Hospital, Terma Lefkou Pyrgou, Xanthi, 67100, Greece, perdikakis_ev@yahoo.gr.

ABSTRACT

Objectives and methods: A variety of benign cystic or "cyst-like" lesions may be encountered during a routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee. These lesions comprise a diverse group of entities from benign cysts to complications of underlying diseases. In addition, normal anatomic bursae and recesses may be misdiagnosed as an intra-articular cystic lesion when they are distended. However, the majority of the aforementioned lesions have characteristic MR appearances that allow a confident diagnosis, thus obviating the need for additional imaging or interventional procedures.

Results: This article includes a comprehensive pictorial essay of the characteristic MRI features of common and uncommon benign cysts and "cyst-like" lesions in and around the knee joint.

Discussion: For accurate assessment of the "cystic structure", a radiologist should be able to identify typical MRI patterns that contribute in establishing the correct diagnosis and thus guiding specific therapy and avoiding unwarranted interventional procedures such as biopsy or arthroscopy.

Teaching points: • Cystic lesions are common in knee MRI and the commonest, the Baker's cyst, has an incidence of 38 %. • Synovial cysts, meniscal cysts, normal knee bursae and recesses have characteristic MR appearances. • Miscellaneous "cyst-like" lesions may require a more dedicated MR protocol for a correct diagnosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Deep infrapatellar bursitis. The sagittal fat saturated proton density weighted image demonstrates a small fluid collection in the deep infrapatellar bursa (arrow), between the distal patellar tendon and the tibia
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Fig16: Deep infrapatellar bursitis. The sagittal fat saturated proton density weighted image demonstrates a small fluid collection in the deep infrapatellar bursa (arrow), between the distal patellar tendon and the tibia

Mentions: The deep infrapatellar bursa is located between the posterior margin of the distal part of the patellar tendon and the anterior tibia, beneath Hoffa’s fat pad [1, 2, 6, 8, 35]. There is no communication with the knee joint and is usually inflamed in overuse sports injuries, most commonly in runners and jumpers. On MRI a fluid collection is seen between the distal patellar tendon and the tibia. However, a small amount of fluid in the deep infrapatellar bursa may be present in asymptomatic individuals, and for that reason clinical correlation is warranted (Fig. 16).Fig. 16


MRI characteristics of cysts and "cyst-like" lesions in and around the knee: what the radiologist needs to know.

Perdikakis E, Skiadas V - Insights Imaging (2013)

Deep infrapatellar bursitis. The sagittal fat saturated proton density weighted image demonstrates a small fluid collection in the deep infrapatellar bursa (arrow), between the distal patellar tendon and the tibia
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3675245&req=5

Fig16: Deep infrapatellar bursitis. The sagittal fat saturated proton density weighted image demonstrates a small fluid collection in the deep infrapatellar bursa (arrow), between the distal patellar tendon and the tibia
Mentions: The deep infrapatellar bursa is located between the posterior margin of the distal part of the patellar tendon and the anterior tibia, beneath Hoffa’s fat pad [1, 2, 6, 8, 35]. There is no communication with the knee joint and is usually inflamed in overuse sports injuries, most commonly in runners and jumpers. On MRI a fluid collection is seen between the distal patellar tendon and the tibia. However, a small amount of fluid in the deep infrapatellar bursa may be present in asymptomatic individuals, and for that reason clinical correlation is warranted (Fig. 16).Fig. 16

Bottom Line: A variety of benign cystic or "cyst-like" lesions may be encountered during a routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee.In addition, normal anatomic bursae and recesses may be misdiagnosed as an intra-articular cystic lesion when they are distended.However, the majority of the aforementioned lesions have characteristic MR appearances that allow a confident diagnosis, thus obviating the need for additional imaging or interventional procedures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, 412 General Military Hospital-212 Mobile Army Surgical Hospital, Terma Lefkou Pyrgou, Xanthi, 67100, Greece, perdikakis_ev@yahoo.gr.

ABSTRACT

Objectives and methods: A variety of benign cystic or "cyst-like" lesions may be encountered during a routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee. These lesions comprise a diverse group of entities from benign cysts to complications of underlying diseases. In addition, normal anatomic bursae and recesses may be misdiagnosed as an intra-articular cystic lesion when they are distended. However, the majority of the aforementioned lesions have characteristic MR appearances that allow a confident diagnosis, thus obviating the need for additional imaging or interventional procedures.

Results: This article includes a comprehensive pictorial essay of the characteristic MRI features of common and uncommon benign cysts and "cyst-like" lesions in and around the knee joint.

Discussion: For accurate assessment of the "cystic structure", a radiologist should be able to identify typical MRI patterns that contribute in establishing the correct diagnosis and thus guiding specific therapy and avoiding unwarranted interventional procedures such as biopsy or arthroscopy.

Teaching points: • Cystic lesions are common in knee MRI and the commonest, the Baker's cyst, has an incidence of 38 %. • Synovial cysts, meniscal cysts, normal knee bursae and recesses have characteristic MR appearances. • Miscellaneous "cyst-like" lesions may require a more dedicated MR protocol for a correct diagnosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus