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Iterative reconstruction does not substantially delay CT imaging in an emergency setting.

Willemink MJ, Schilham AM, Leiner T, Mali WP, de Jong PA, Budde RP - Insights Imaging (2013)

Bottom Line: Twenty-five patients underwent a pulmonary CTA for evaluation of pulmonary embolisms and 15 patients underwent a total body CT after a traumatic event on a 256-slice CT.Images were reconstructed with filtered back-projection (FBP) and two IR levels.For total body trauma CTs these values were 87 ± 15 s, 132 ± 17 s and 132 ± 18 s, and 20.1 ± 1.6 slices/s, 13.2 ± 0.8 slices/s and 13.2 ± 0.6 slices/s for FBP, IR levels 1 and 6, respectively.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Utrecht University Medical Center, P.O. Box 85500, E01.132, 3508 GA, Utrecht, The Netherlands, m.willemink@umcutrecht.nl.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To evaluate the effects of iterative reconstruction (IR) on reconstruction time and speed in two commonly encountered acquisition protocols in an emergency setting: pulmonary CT angiography (CTA) and total body trauma CT.

Methods: Twenty-five patients underwent a pulmonary CTA for evaluation of pulmonary embolisms and 15 patients underwent a total body CT after a traumatic event on a 256-slice CT. Images were reconstructed with filtered back-projection (FBP) and two IR levels. Reconstruction time and speed were quantified using custom written software.

Results: Mean reconstruction time delays for pulmonary CTAs were 10 ± 10 s and 12 ± 12 s for IR levels 2 and 4, respectively, and 44 ± 8 s and 45 ± 7 s for total body trauma CTs for IR levels 1 and 6, respectively. Mean reconstruction times and speeds for pulmonary CTAs were 26 ± 7 s, 36 ± 9 s and 38 ± 12 s, and 26.7 ± 5.6 slices/s, 18.7 ± 2.3 slices/s and 18.0 ± 2.8 slices/s for FBP, IR levels 2 and 4, respectively. For total body trauma CTs these values were 87 ± 15 s, 132 ± 17 s and 132 ± 18 s, and 20.1 ± 1.6 slices/s, 13.2 ± 0.8 slices/s and 13.2 ± 0.6 slices/s for FBP, IR levels 1 and 6, respectively.

Conclusions: IR does not result in clinically important CT image reconstruction delays in an emergency setting. No substantial differences in reconstruction time and speed were found between different IR levels.

Main messages: • IR delayed total pulmonary CTA reconstruction with 10-12 s and total-body trauma CT with 44-45 s • IR is not substantially delaying reconstruction in emergency CT imaging • Reconstruction time and speed are similar for different levels of IR.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean reconstruction time delay of the pulmonary CTAs (a) and the total body trauma CTs (b) with iterative reconstruction compared with filtered back projection
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Fig1: Mean reconstruction time delay of the pulmonary CTAs (a) and the total body trauma CTs (b) with iterative reconstruction compared with filtered back projection

Mentions: Compared with FBP reconstruction, the time delay for reconstruction of an entire pulmonary CTA was on average 10 ± 10 s (40 %) and 12 ± 12 s (47 %) for iDose4 levels 2 and level 4, respectively (Fig. 1a). For the four datasets of an entire total body trauma CT the combined time delay was 44 ± 8 s (51 %) and 45 ± 7 s (51 %) for iDose4 levels 1 and 6, respectively, compared with FBP (Fig. 1b).Fig. 1


Iterative reconstruction does not substantially delay CT imaging in an emergency setting.

Willemink MJ, Schilham AM, Leiner T, Mali WP, de Jong PA, Budde RP - Insights Imaging (2013)

Mean reconstruction time delay of the pulmonary CTAs (a) and the total body trauma CTs (b) with iterative reconstruction compared with filtered back projection
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3675244&req=5

Fig1: Mean reconstruction time delay of the pulmonary CTAs (a) and the total body trauma CTs (b) with iterative reconstruction compared with filtered back projection
Mentions: Compared with FBP reconstruction, the time delay for reconstruction of an entire pulmonary CTA was on average 10 ± 10 s (40 %) and 12 ± 12 s (47 %) for iDose4 levels 2 and level 4, respectively (Fig. 1a). For the four datasets of an entire total body trauma CT the combined time delay was 44 ± 8 s (51 %) and 45 ± 7 s (51 %) for iDose4 levels 1 and 6, respectively, compared with FBP (Fig. 1b).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Twenty-five patients underwent a pulmonary CTA for evaluation of pulmonary embolisms and 15 patients underwent a total body CT after a traumatic event on a 256-slice CT.Images were reconstructed with filtered back-projection (FBP) and two IR levels.For total body trauma CTs these values were 87 ± 15 s, 132 ± 17 s and 132 ± 18 s, and 20.1 ± 1.6 slices/s, 13.2 ± 0.8 slices/s and 13.2 ± 0.6 slices/s for FBP, IR levels 1 and 6, respectively.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Utrecht University Medical Center, P.O. Box 85500, E01.132, 3508 GA, Utrecht, The Netherlands, m.willemink@umcutrecht.nl.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To evaluate the effects of iterative reconstruction (IR) on reconstruction time and speed in two commonly encountered acquisition protocols in an emergency setting: pulmonary CT angiography (CTA) and total body trauma CT.

Methods: Twenty-five patients underwent a pulmonary CTA for evaluation of pulmonary embolisms and 15 patients underwent a total body CT after a traumatic event on a 256-slice CT. Images were reconstructed with filtered back-projection (FBP) and two IR levels. Reconstruction time and speed were quantified using custom written software.

Results: Mean reconstruction time delays for pulmonary CTAs were 10 ± 10 s and 12 ± 12 s for IR levels 2 and 4, respectively, and 44 ± 8 s and 45 ± 7 s for total body trauma CTs for IR levels 1 and 6, respectively. Mean reconstruction times and speeds for pulmonary CTAs were 26 ± 7 s, 36 ± 9 s and 38 ± 12 s, and 26.7 ± 5.6 slices/s, 18.7 ± 2.3 slices/s and 18.0 ± 2.8 slices/s for FBP, IR levels 2 and 4, respectively. For total body trauma CTs these values were 87 ± 15 s, 132 ± 17 s and 132 ± 18 s, and 20.1 ± 1.6 slices/s, 13.2 ± 0.8 slices/s and 13.2 ± 0.6 slices/s for FBP, IR levels 1 and 6, respectively.

Conclusions: IR does not result in clinically important CT image reconstruction delays in an emergency setting. No substantial differences in reconstruction time and speed were found between different IR levels.

Main messages: • IR delayed total pulmonary CTA reconstruction with 10-12 s and total-body trauma CT with 44-45 s • IR is not substantially delaying reconstruction in emergency CT imaging • Reconstruction time and speed are similar for different levels of IR.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus