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Age at menarche and risk of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis.

Li CY, Song B, Wang YY, Meng H, Guo SB, Liu LN, Lv HC, Wu QJ - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: The random-effects pooled RR for oldest versus youngest menarcheal age was 0.95 [95% confidence intervals (CIs) = 0.85-1.06], with significant heterogeneity (Q = 61.03, P<0.001, I (2) = 65.6%).Findings from this meta-analysis demonstrated that menarcheal age was not associated with the risk of CRC in humans.Further studies are warranted to stratify results by the subsite of colon cancer and menopause status in the future.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian, China. Lichunyan_dl@163.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Various observational studies have focused on the relationship between menarcheal age and the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the association is still controversial because of inconsistent results. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to assess this issue from epidemiological studies.

Methods: After a literature search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Web of Science for studies of menarcheal age and CRC risk published through the end of January 2013, we pooled the relative risks (RRs) from included studies using a fixed- or random-effects model and performed heterogeneity and publication bias analyses. All statistical tests were two-sided.

Results: Eleven case-control and 11 cohort studies were eligible for inclusion in our analysis. The random-effects pooled RR for oldest versus youngest menarcheal age was 0.95 [95% confidence intervals (CIs) = 0.85-1.06], with significant heterogeneity (Q = 61.03, P<0.001, I (2) = 65.6%). When separately analyzed, case-control (RR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.75-1.21) and cohort studies (RR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.90-1.04) yielded similar results. Moreover, similar results were also observed among the subgroup analyses by study quality, population, exposure assessment, anatomic cancer site, subsite of colon cancer, and several potential important confounders and risk factors. There was no evidence of publication bias and significant heterogeneity between subgroups detected by meta-regression analyses.

Conclusions: Findings from this meta-analysis demonstrated that menarcheal age was not associated with the risk of CRC in humans. Further studies are warranted to stratify results by the subsite of colon cancer and menopause status in the future.

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Selection of studies for inclusion in meta-analysis.
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pone-0065645-g001: Selection of studies for inclusion in meta-analysis.

Mentions: We identified 13 prospective cohort studies [9], [14], [15], [16], [18], [19], [21], [22], [23], [24], [25], [26], [27] and 17 case-control studies [10], [11], [12], [13], [17], [28], [29], [30], [31], [32], [33], [34], [35], [36], [37], [38], [39] with data that were potentially eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis. On this review, one cohort [26] and three case-control studies [34], [35], [36] was duplicate reports from the same study population but we only included two case-control studies [34], [35] in the subgroup analyses because they provided the information of the anatomic cancer site of CRC and cancer subsite of colon, one cohort [27] and three case-control studies [37], [38], [39] were excluded because they did not report usable or enough data of risk estimates. The remaining 22 studies were included in the meta-analysis (Figure 1).


Age at menarche and risk of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis.

Li CY, Song B, Wang YY, Meng H, Guo SB, Liu LN, Lv HC, Wu QJ - PLoS ONE (2013)

Selection of studies for inclusion in meta-analysis.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3675201&req=5

pone-0065645-g001: Selection of studies for inclusion in meta-analysis.
Mentions: We identified 13 prospective cohort studies [9], [14], [15], [16], [18], [19], [21], [22], [23], [24], [25], [26], [27] and 17 case-control studies [10], [11], [12], [13], [17], [28], [29], [30], [31], [32], [33], [34], [35], [36], [37], [38], [39] with data that were potentially eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis. On this review, one cohort [26] and three case-control studies [34], [35], [36] was duplicate reports from the same study population but we only included two case-control studies [34], [35] in the subgroup analyses because they provided the information of the anatomic cancer site of CRC and cancer subsite of colon, one cohort [27] and three case-control studies [37], [38], [39] were excluded because they did not report usable or enough data of risk estimates. The remaining 22 studies were included in the meta-analysis (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: The random-effects pooled RR for oldest versus youngest menarcheal age was 0.95 [95% confidence intervals (CIs) = 0.85-1.06], with significant heterogeneity (Q = 61.03, P<0.001, I (2) = 65.6%).Findings from this meta-analysis demonstrated that menarcheal age was not associated with the risk of CRC in humans.Further studies are warranted to stratify results by the subsite of colon cancer and menopause status in the future.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian, China. Lichunyan_dl@163.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Various observational studies have focused on the relationship between menarcheal age and the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the association is still controversial because of inconsistent results. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to assess this issue from epidemiological studies.

Methods: After a literature search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Web of Science for studies of menarcheal age and CRC risk published through the end of January 2013, we pooled the relative risks (RRs) from included studies using a fixed- or random-effects model and performed heterogeneity and publication bias analyses. All statistical tests were two-sided.

Results: Eleven case-control and 11 cohort studies were eligible for inclusion in our analysis. The random-effects pooled RR for oldest versus youngest menarcheal age was 0.95 [95% confidence intervals (CIs) = 0.85-1.06], with significant heterogeneity (Q = 61.03, P<0.001, I (2) = 65.6%). When separately analyzed, case-control (RR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.75-1.21) and cohort studies (RR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.90-1.04) yielded similar results. Moreover, similar results were also observed among the subgroup analyses by study quality, population, exposure assessment, anatomic cancer site, subsite of colon cancer, and several potential important confounders and risk factors. There was no evidence of publication bias and significant heterogeneity between subgroups detected by meta-regression analyses.

Conclusions: Findings from this meta-analysis demonstrated that menarcheal age was not associated with the risk of CRC in humans. Further studies are warranted to stratify results by the subsite of colon cancer and menopause status in the future.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus