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Randomized controlled trial of behavioral treatment for comorbid obesity and depression in women: the Be Active Trial.

Pagoto S, Schneider KL, Whited MC, Oleski JL, Merriam P, Appelhans B, Ma Y, Olendzki B, Waring ME, Busch AM, Lemon S, Ockene I, Crawford S - Int J Obes (Lond) (2013)

Bottom Line: Intention-to-treat analyses revealed both conditions lost significant weight, but no differences between conditions in weight change at 6 months (BA=-3.0%, s.e.=-0.65%; LI=-3.7%, s.e.=0.63%; P=0.48) or 12 months (BA=-2.6%, s.e.=0.77%; LI=-3.1%, s.e.=0.74%; P=0.72).Participants who experienced depression remission by 6 months (61.2%) lost greater weight (mean=-4.31%; s.e.=0.052) than those who did not (39.7%; mean=-2.47%, s.e.=0.53; P=.001).Improvement in depression is associated with greater weight loss.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Depression is associated with increased risk for obesity and worse weight loss treatment outcomes. The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that delivering evidence-based behavior therapy for depression before a lifestyle weight loss intervention improves both weight loss and depression.

Design: In a randomized controlled trial, obese women with major depressive disorder (N=161, mean age=45.9 (s.d.: 10.8) years) were randomized to brief behavior therapy for depression treatment followed by a lifestyle intervention (BA) or a lifestyle intervention only (LI). Follow-up occurred at 6 and 12 months. Main outcome measures included weight loss and depression symptoms.

Results: Intention-to-treat analyses revealed both conditions lost significant weight, but no differences between conditions in weight change at 6 months (BA=-3.0%, s.e.=-0.65%; LI=-3.7%, s.e.=0.63%; P=0.48) or 12 months (BA=-2.6%, s.e.=0.77%; LI=-3.1%, s.e.=0.74%; P=0.72). However, the BA condition evidenced significantly greater improvement in Beck Depression Inventory-II scores relative to the LI condition at both 6 months (BA mean change=-12.5, s.d.=0.85; LI mean change=-9.2, s.d.=0.80, P=0.005) and 12 months (BA mean change=-12.6, s.d.=0.97; LI mean change=-9.9, s.d.=0.93; P=0.045). Participants who experienced depression remission by 6 months (61.2%) lost greater weight (mean=-4.31%; s.e.=0.052) than those who did not (39.7%; mean=-2.47%, s.e.=0.53; P=.001).

Conclusion: Adding behavior therapy to a lifestyle intervention results in greater depression remission but does not improve weight loss within 1 year. Improvement in depression is associated with greater weight loss.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

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Mentions: Detailed design and methods information has been published elsewhere.[16] Briefly, obese women (BMI 30–40 kg/m2) with major depressive disorder between ages 21–65 years were recruited (July 2007-March 2010) from the community and primary care population at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. The CONSORT diagram in Figure 1 shows participant flow through the study. The Institutional Review Board approved study protocol. Exclusion criteria included currently smoking, bipolar disorder, psychotic disorder, bulimia, post-traumatic stress disorder, type 1 or 2 diabetes, or medications that affect weight. The most common exclusion medications were tricyclic antidepressants and mood stabilizers.


Randomized controlled trial of behavioral treatment for comorbid obesity and depression in women: the Be Active Trial.

Pagoto S, Schneider KL, Whited MC, Oleski JL, Merriam P, Appelhans B, Ma Y, Olendzki B, Waring ME, Busch AM, Lemon S, Ockene I, Crawford S - Int J Obes (Lond) (2013)

© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3675166&req=5

Mentions: Detailed design and methods information has been published elsewhere.[16] Briefly, obese women (BMI 30–40 kg/m2) with major depressive disorder between ages 21–65 years were recruited (July 2007-March 2010) from the community and primary care population at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. The CONSORT diagram in Figure 1 shows participant flow through the study. The Institutional Review Board approved study protocol. Exclusion criteria included currently smoking, bipolar disorder, psychotic disorder, bulimia, post-traumatic stress disorder, type 1 or 2 diabetes, or medications that affect weight. The most common exclusion medications were tricyclic antidepressants and mood stabilizers.

Bottom Line: Intention-to-treat analyses revealed both conditions lost significant weight, but no differences between conditions in weight change at 6 months (BA=-3.0%, s.e.=-0.65%; LI=-3.7%, s.e.=0.63%; P=0.48) or 12 months (BA=-2.6%, s.e.=0.77%; LI=-3.1%, s.e.=0.74%; P=0.72).Participants who experienced depression remission by 6 months (61.2%) lost greater weight (mean=-4.31%; s.e.=0.052) than those who did not (39.7%; mean=-2.47%, s.e.=0.53; P=.001).Improvement in depression is associated with greater weight loss.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Depression is associated with increased risk for obesity and worse weight loss treatment outcomes. The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that delivering evidence-based behavior therapy for depression before a lifestyle weight loss intervention improves both weight loss and depression.

Design: In a randomized controlled trial, obese women with major depressive disorder (N=161, mean age=45.9 (s.d.: 10.8) years) were randomized to brief behavior therapy for depression treatment followed by a lifestyle intervention (BA) or a lifestyle intervention only (LI). Follow-up occurred at 6 and 12 months. Main outcome measures included weight loss and depression symptoms.

Results: Intention-to-treat analyses revealed both conditions lost significant weight, but no differences between conditions in weight change at 6 months (BA=-3.0%, s.e.=-0.65%; LI=-3.7%, s.e.=0.63%; P=0.48) or 12 months (BA=-2.6%, s.e.=0.77%; LI=-3.1%, s.e.=0.74%; P=0.72). However, the BA condition evidenced significantly greater improvement in Beck Depression Inventory-II scores relative to the LI condition at both 6 months (BA mean change=-12.5, s.d.=0.85; LI mean change=-9.2, s.d.=0.80, P=0.005) and 12 months (BA mean change=-12.6, s.d.=0.97; LI mean change=-9.9, s.d.=0.93; P=0.045). Participants who experienced depression remission by 6 months (61.2%) lost greater weight (mean=-4.31%; s.e.=0.052) than those who did not (39.7%; mean=-2.47%, s.e.=0.53; P=.001).

Conclusion: Adding behavior therapy to a lifestyle intervention results in greater depression remission but does not improve weight loss within 1 year. Improvement in depression is associated with greater weight loss.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus