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The snail family gene snai3 is not essential for embryogenesis in mice.

Bradley CK, Norton CR, Chen Y, Han X, Booth CJ, Yoon JK, Krebs LT, Gridley T - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: Three members of the Snail gene family have been described in mammals, encoded by the Snai1, Snai2, and Snai3 genes.However, little is known about the function of the Snai3 gene and protein.We also generated an EYFP-tagged Snai3 allele that accurately reflects endogenous Snai3 gene expression, with the highest levels of expression detected in thymus and skeletal muscle.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Molecular Medicine, Maine Medical Center Research Institute, Scarborough, Maine, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
The Snail gene family encodes zinc finger-containing transcriptional repressor proteins. Three members of the Snail gene family have been described in mammals, encoded by the Snai1, Snai2, and Snai3 genes. The function of the Snai1 and Snai2 genes have been studied extensively during both vertebrate embryogenesis and tumor progression and metastasis, and play critically important roles during these processes. However, little is known about the function of the Snai3 gene and protein. We describe here generation and analysis of Snai3 conditional and mutant mice. We also generated an EYFP-tagged Snai3 allele that accurately reflects endogenous Snai3 gene expression, with the highest levels of expression detected in thymus and skeletal muscle. Snai3 mutant homozygous mice are viable and fertile, and exhibit no obvious phenotypic defects. These results demonstrate that Snai3 gene function is not essential for embryogenesis in mice.

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Snai3-EYFP/Snai3-EYFP homozygous mice do not exhibit altered lymphoid differentiation.Flow cytometry analyses of cells from bone marrow and thymus demonstrated that Snai3-EYFP/Snai3-EYFP homozygous mice (n = 3) did not exhibit obvious defects in differentiation of B, immature T, or mature T cells.
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pone-0065344-g004: Snai3-EYFP/Snai3-EYFP homozygous mice do not exhibit altered lymphoid differentiation.Flow cytometry analyses of cells from bone marrow and thymus demonstrated that Snai3-EYFP/Snai3-EYFP homozygous mice (n = 3) did not exhibit obvious defects in differentiation of B, immature T, or mature T cells.

Mentions: Snai3 and Snai3-EYFP homozygous embryos and mice did not exhibit any obvious phenotype. Both Snai3/Snai3 (Table 1) and Snai3-EYFP/Snai3-EYFP homozygotes were born at expected Mendelian frequencies. Analysis of postnatal growth curves showed no differences in the rate of growth of either male or female Snai3 homozygotes versus their heterozygous and wild type littermate controls (Fig. 3). Flow cytometry analyses of bone marrow cells and thymocytes from Snai3-EYFP homozygous mice did not reveal obvious defects in differentiation of B and T cells (Fig. 4). Since neural crest cell-specific deletion of the Snai1 gene on a Snai2 genetic background results in craniofacial defects [11], and the Snai3 gene is expressed in the first branchial arch (Fig. 2A), we examined alcian-blue/alizarin-red stained skeletons from Snai3 homozygous and littermate control mice. Analysis of these skeletal preparations did not reveal any obvious defects in the cranial, axial or limb skeletons of Snai3/Snai3 mice (data not shown). We also performed extensive histopathological and clinical chemistry analyses of Snai3 homozygous and wild type littermate control mice at eight to ten months of age. These analyses did not reveal any abnormal phenotype reproducibly present in the Snai3/Snai3 mice. We conclude that the Snai3 gene is not essential for embryogenesis and normal development in mice.


The snail family gene snai3 is not essential for embryogenesis in mice.

Bradley CK, Norton CR, Chen Y, Han X, Booth CJ, Yoon JK, Krebs LT, Gridley T - PLoS ONE (2013)

Snai3-EYFP/Snai3-EYFP homozygous mice do not exhibit altered lymphoid differentiation.Flow cytometry analyses of cells from bone marrow and thymus demonstrated that Snai3-EYFP/Snai3-EYFP homozygous mice (n = 3) did not exhibit obvious defects in differentiation of B, immature T, or mature T cells.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3675094&req=5

pone-0065344-g004: Snai3-EYFP/Snai3-EYFP homozygous mice do not exhibit altered lymphoid differentiation.Flow cytometry analyses of cells from bone marrow and thymus demonstrated that Snai3-EYFP/Snai3-EYFP homozygous mice (n = 3) did not exhibit obvious defects in differentiation of B, immature T, or mature T cells.
Mentions: Snai3 and Snai3-EYFP homozygous embryos and mice did not exhibit any obvious phenotype. Both Snai3/Snai3 (Table 1) and Snai3-EYFP/Snai3-EYFP homozygotes were born at expected Mendelian frequencies. Analysis of postnatal growth curves showed no differences in the rate of growth of either male or female Snai3 homozygotes versus their heterozygous and wild type littermate controls (Fig. 3). Flow cytometry analyses of bone marrow cells and thymocytes from Snai3-EYFP homozygous mice did not reveal obvious defects in differentiation of B and T cells (Fig. 4). Since neural crest cell-specific deletion of the Snai1 gene on a Snai2 genetic background results in craniofacial defects [11], and the Snai3 gene is expressed in the first branchial arch (Fig. 2A), we examined alcian-blue/alizarin-red stained skeletons from Snai3 homozygous and littermate control mice. Analysis of these skeletal preparations did not reveal any obvious defects in the cranial, axial or limb skeletons of Snai3/Snai3 mice (data not shown). We also performed extensive histopathological and clinical chemistry analyses of Snai3 homozygous and wild type littermate control mice at eight to ten months of age. These analyses did not reveal any abnormal phenotype reproducibly present in the Snai3/Snai3 mice. We conclude that the Snai3 gene is not essential for embryogenesis and normal development in mice.

Bottom Line: Three members of the Snail gene family have been described in mammals, encoded by the Snai1, Snai2, and Snai3 genes.However, little is known about the function of the Snai3 gene and protein.We also generated an EYFP-tagged Snai3 allele that accurately reflects endogenous Snai3 gene expression, with the highest levels of expression detected in thymus and skeletal muscle.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Molecular Medicine, Maine Medical Center Research Institute, Scarborough, Maine, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
The Snail gene family encodes zinc finger-containing transcriptional repressor proteins. Three members of the Snail gene family have been described in mammals, encoded by the Snai1, Snai2, and Snai3 genes. The function of the Snai1 and Snai2 genes have been studied extensively during both vertebrate embryogenesis and tumor progression and metastasis, and play critically important roles during these processes. However, little is known about the function of the Snai3 gene and protein. We describe here generation and analysis of Snai3 conditional and mutant mice. We also generated an EYFP-tagged Snai3 allele that accurately reflects endogenous Snai3 gene expression, with the highest levels of expression detected in thymus and skeletal muscle. Snai3 mutant homozygous mice are viable and fertile, and exhibit no obvious phenotypic defects. These results demonstrate that Snai3 gene function is not essential for embryogenesis in mice.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus