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Specific and evolving resting-state network alterations in post-concussion syndrome following mild traumatic brain injury.

Messé A, Caplain S, Pélégrini-Issac M, Blancho S, Lévy R, Aghakhani N, Montreuil M, Benali H, Lehéricy S - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: Group-wise differences in functional brain networks were analyzed using graph theory measures.Patterns of long-range functional networks alterations were found in all mild traumatic brain injury patients.Our results suggest that the post-concussion syndrome is associated with specific abnormalities in functional brain network that may contribute to explain deficits typically observed in PCS patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Inserm, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMRS 678, Laboratoire d'Imagerie Fonctionnelle, Paris, France. Arnaud.Messe@imed.jussieu.fr

ABSTRACT
Post-concussion syndrome has been related to axonal damage in patients with mild traumatic brain injury, but little is known about the consequences of injury on brain networks. In the present study, our aim was to characterize changes in functional brain networks following mild traumatic brain injury in patients with post-concussion syndrome using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data. We investigated 17 injured patients with persistent post-concussion syndrome (under the DSM-IV criteria) at 6 months post-injury compared with 38 mild traumatic brain injury patients with no post-concussion syndrome and 34 healthy controls. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging examinations at the subacute (1-3 weeks) and late (6 months) phases after injury. Group-wise differences in functional brain networks were analyzed using graph theory measures. Patterns of long-range functional networks alterations were found in all mild traumatic brain injury patients. Mild traumatic brain injury patients with post-concussion syndrome had greater alterations than patients without post-concussion syndrome. In patients with post-concussion syndrome, changes specifically affected temporal and thalamic regions predominantly at the subacute stage and frontal regions at the late phase. Our results suggest that the post-concussion syndrome is associated with specific abnormalities in functional brain network that may contribute to explain deficits typically observed in PCS patients.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Association of modularity (left) and local efficiency of superior frontal regions (right) with symptom severity in mTBI patients at the late phase.
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pone-0065470-g001: Association of modularity (left) and local efficiency of superior frontal regions (right) with symptom severity in mTBI patients at the late phase.

Mentions: All networks studied, across individuals, presented a small world behavior characterized by a modular, hierarchical, assortative and non-random topology. Significant differences were found between groups for modularity, which was significantly lower in PCS+ patients than in PCS– patients at the late phase (p = 0.03, Table 1). This suggested that networks were less partitioned into communities in PCS+ patients. Moreover, we observed a small, but significant, negative relation between modularity and symptom severity in mTBI patients at 6 months after injury only (r = −0.33, p = 0.013; Figure 1). There were no other significant differences in overall properties.


Specific and evolving resting-state network alterations in post-concussion syndrome following mild traumatic brain injury.

Messé A, Caplain S, Pélégrini-Issac M, Blancho S, Lévy R, Aghakhani N, Montreuil M, Benali H, Lehéricy S - PLoS ONE (2013)

Association of modularity (left) and local efficiency of superior frontal regions (right) with symptom severity in mTBI patients at the late phase.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3675039&req=5

pone-0065470-g001: Association of modularity (left) and local efficiency of superior frontal regions (right) with symptom severity in mTBI patients at the late phase.
Mentions: All networks studied, across individuals, presented a small world behavior characterized by a modular, hierarchical, assortative and non-random topology. Significant differences were found between groups for modularity, which was significantly lower in PCS+ patients than in PCS– patients at the late phase (p = 0.03, Table 1). This suggested that networks were less partitioned into communities in PCS+ patients. Moreover, we observed a small, but significant, negative relation between modularity and symptom severity in mTBI patients at 6 months after injury only (r = −0.33, p = 0.013; Figure 1). There were no other significant differences in overall properties.

Bottom Line: Group-wise differences in functional brain networks were analyzed using graph theory measures.Patterns of long-range functional networks alterations were found in all mild traumatic brain injury patients.Our results suggest that the post-concussion syndrome is associated with specific abnormalities in functional brain network that may contribute to explain deficits typically observed in PCS patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Inserm, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMRS 678, Laboratoire d'Imagerie Fonctionnelle, Paris, France. Arnaud.Messe@imed.jussieu.fr

ABSTRACT
Post-concussion syndrome has been related to axonal damage in patients with mild traumatic brain injury, but little is known about the consequences of injury on brain networks. In the present study, our aim was to characterize changes in functional brain networks following mild traumatic brain injury in patients with post-concussion syndrome using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data. We investigated 17 injured patients with persistent post-concussion syndrome (under the DSM-IV criteria) at 6 months post-injury compared with 38 mild traumatic brain injury patients with no post-concussion syndrome and 34 healthy controls. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging examinations at the subacute (1-3 weeks) and late (6 months) phases after injury. Group-wise differences in functional brain networks were analyzed using graph theory measures. Patterns of long-range functional networks alterations were found in all mild traumatic brain injury patients. Mild traumatic brain injury patients with post-concussion syndrome had greater alterations than patients without post-concussion syndrome. In patients with post-concussion syndrome, changes specifically affected temporal and thalamic regions predominantly at the subacute stage and frontal regions at the late phase. Our results suggest that the post-concussion syndrome is associated with specific abnormalities in functional brain network that may contribute to explain deficits typically observed in PCS patients.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus