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Healthy older observers show equivalent perceptual-cognitive training benefits to young adults for multiple object tracking.

Legault I, Allard R, Faubert J - Front Psychol (2013)

Bottom Line: It is well documented that effects of healthy aging can influence perceptual-cognitive processes (Faubert, 2002) and that the efficiency of such processes can improve with training even for older adults (Richards et al., 2006).Results show that this capacity is significantly affected by healthy aging but that perceptual-cognitive training can significantly reduce age-related effects in older individuals, who show an identical learning function to younger healthy adults.Data support the notion that learning in healthy older persons is maintained for processing complex dynamic scenes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Visual Psychophysics and Perception Laboratory, School of Optometry, Université de Montréal , Montreal, QC , Canada.

ABSTRACT
The capacity to process complex dynamic scenes is of critical importance in real life. For instance, traveling through a crowd while avoiding collisions and maintaining orientation and good motor control requires fluent and continuous perceptual-cognitive processing. It is well documented that effects of healthy aging can influence perceptual-cognitive processes (Faubert, 2002) and that the efficiency of such processes can improve with training even for older adults (Richards et al., 2006). Here we assess the capacity of older participants to improve their tracking speed thresholds in a dynamic, virtual reality environment. Results show that this capacity is significantly affected by healthy aging but that perceptual-cognitive training can significantly reduce age-related effects in older individuals, who show an identical learning function to younger healthy adults. Data support the notion that learning in healthy older persons is maintained for processing complex dynamic scenes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Twenty younger and 20 older adults speed thresholds (±SEM) for five consecutive weeks.
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Figure 4: Twenty younger and 20 older adults speed thresholds (±SEM) for five consecutive weeks.

Mentions: A split-plot ANOVA on log speed thresholds comparing post-training condition (week 5) versus the initial scores (week 1) revealed a significant group effect, F(1, 41) = 18.250, p < 0.001 and a significant training effect F(1, 41) = 65.747, p < 0.001. Specifically, younger adults obtained higher thresholds compared to older adults and thresholds increased with testing sessions (Figure 4). However, we did not obtain a significant Age × Training interaction, F(1, 41) = 2.615, p = 0.114, which reveals that both groups obtained similar benefit from training. There is a similar progression for both groups. Figure 4 shows that trained older observers obtained thresholds that were similar to those of untrained younger adults (week 1) [t(1, 19) = 0.495, p = 0.626].


Healthy older observers show equivalent perceptual-cognitive training benefits to young adults for multiple object tracking.

Legault I, Allard R, Faubert J - Front Psychol (2013)

Twenty younger and 20 older adults speed thresholds (±SEM) for five consecutive weeks.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3674476&req=5

Figure 4: Twenty younger and 20 older adults speed thresholds (±SEM) for five consecutive weeks.
Mentions: A split-plot ANOVA on log speed thresholds comparing post-training condition (week 5) versus the initial scores (week 1) revealed a significant group effect, F(1, 41) = 18.250, p < 0.001 and a significant training effect F(1, 41) = 65.747, p < 0.001. Specifically, younger adults obtained higher thresholds compared to older adults and thresholds increased with testing sessions (Figure 4). However, we did not obtain a significant Age × Training interaction, F(1, 41) = 2.615, p = 0.114, which reveals that both groups obtained similar benefit from training. There is a similar progression for both groups. Figure 4 shows that trained older observers obtained thresholds that were similar to those of untrained younger adults (week 1) [t(1, 19) = 0.495, p = 0.626].

Bottom Line: It is well documented that effects of healthy aging can influence perceptual-cognitive processes (Faubert, 2002) and that the efficiency of such processes can improve with training even for older adults (Richards et al., 2006).Results show that this capacity is significantly affected by healthy aging but that perceptual-cognitive training can significantly reduce age-related effects in older individuals, who show an identical learning function to younger healthy adults.Data support the notion that learning in healthy older persons is maintained for processing complex dynamic scenes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Visual Psychophysics and Perception Laboratory, School of Optometry, Université de Montréal , Montreal, QC , Canada.

ABSTRACT
The capacity to process complex dynamic scenes is of critical importance in real life. For instance, traveling through a crowd while avoiding collisions and maintaining orientation and good motor control requires fluent and continuous perceptual-cognitive processing. It is well documented that effects of healthy aging can influence perceptual-cognitive processes (Faubert, 2002) and that the efficiency of such processes can improve with training even for older adults (Richards et al., 2006). Here we assess the capacity of older participants to improve their tracking speed thresholds in a dynamic, virtual reality environment. Results show that this capacity is significantly affected by healthy aging but that perceptual-cognitive training can significantly reduce age-related effects in older individuals, who show an identical learning function to younger healthy adults. Data support the notion that learning in healthy older persons is maintained for processing complex dynamic scenes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus