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Quantitative phase imaging techniques for the study of cell pathophysiology: from principles to applications.

Lee K, Kim K, Jung J, Heo J, Cho S, Lee S, Chang G, Jo Y, Park H, Park Y - Sensors (Basel) (2013)

Bottom Line: A cellular-level study of the pathophysiology is crucial for understanding the mechanisms behind human diseases.Recent advances in quantitative phase imaging (QPI) techniques show promises for the cellular-level understanding of the pathophysiology of diseases.To provide important insight on how the QPI techniques potentially improve the study of cell pathophysiology, here we present the principles of QPI and highlight some of the recent applications of QPI ranging from cell homeostasis to infectious diseases and cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701, Korea. kyeo@kaist.ac.kr

ABSTRACT
A cellular-level study of the pathophysiology is crucial for understanding the mechanisms behind human diseases. Recent advances in quantitative phase imaging (QPI) techniques show promises for the cellular-level understanding of the pathophysiology of diseases. To provide important insight on how the QPI techniques potentially improve the study of cell pathophysiology, here we present the principles of QPI and highlight some of the recent applications of QPI ranging from cell homeostasis to infectious diseases and cancer.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Experimental setups for typical QPI techniques. (A) Michelson interferometric microscopy; (B) Digital holographic microscopy, spatial-domain Mach-Zehnder interferometry; (C) Diffraction phase microscopy, spatial-domain common-path interferometry; (D) Time-domain Mach-Zehnder interferometric microscopy; (E) Tomographic phase microscopy, time-domain Mach-Zehnder type. The angle of illumination is controlled by a galvano-mirror (GM). AOM: acousto-optics modulator; SF: spatial filter; S: sample; OBJ: objective lens; BS: beam splitter; G; grating. (A–E) are modified from References [8, 9, 10 and 11], and [12], respectively, with permissions.
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f2-sensors-13-04170: Experimental setups for typical QPI techniques. (A) Michelson interferometric microscopy; (B) Digital holographic microscopy, spatial-domain Mach-Zehnder interferometry; (C) Diffraction phase microscopy, spatial-domain common-path interferometry; (D) Time-domain Mach-Zehnder interferometric microscopy; (E) Tomographic phase microscopy, time-domain Mach-Zehnder type. The angle of illumination is controlled by a galvano-mirror (GM). AOM: acousto-optics modulator; SF: spatial filter; S: sample; OBJ: objective lens; BS: beam splitter; G; grating. (A–E) are modified from References [8, 9, 10 and 11], and [12], respectively, with permissions.

Mentions: Generally, an interferogram or hologram, in which the optical field information of the sample is modulated with a reference beam (Figure 2), is digitally recorded by an imaging device such as a charge-coupled device (CCD), and the optical field information is then retrieved by appropriate field retrieval algorithms. Depending on the modulation method, QPI techniques can be mainly grouped into either the temporal modulation or spatial modulation.


Quantitative phase imaging techniques for the study of cell pathophysiology: from principles to applications.

Lee K, Kim K, Jung J, Heo J, Cho S, Lee S, Chang G, Jo Y, Park H, Park Y - Sensors (Basel) (2013)

Experimental setups for typical QPI techniques. (A) Michelson interferometric microscopy; (B) Digital holographic microscopy, spatial-domain Mach-Zehnder interferometry; (C) Diffraction phase microscopy, spatial-domain common-path interferometry; (D) Time-domain Mach-Zehnder interferometric microscopy; (E) Tomographic phase microscopy, time-domain Mach-Zehnder type. The angle of illumination is controlled by a galvano-mirror (GM). AOM: acousto-optics modulator; SF: spatial filter; S: sample; OBJ: objective lens; BS: beam splitter; G; grating. (A–E) are modified from References [8, 9, 10 and 11], and [12], respectively, with permissions.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3673078&req=5

f2-sensors-13-04170: Experimental setups for typical QPI techniques. (A) Michelson interferometric microscopy; (B) Digital holographic microscopy, spatial-domain Mach-Zehnder interferometry; (C) Diffraction phase microscopy, spatial-domain common-path interferometry; (D) Time-domain Mach-Zehnder interferometric microscopy; (E) Tomographic phase microscopy, time-domain Mach-Zehnder type. The angle of illumination is controlled by a galvano-mirror (GM). AOM: acousto-optics modulator; SF: spatial filter; S: sample; OBJ: objective lens; BS: beam splitter; G; grating. (A–E) are modified from References [8, 9, 10 and 11], and [12], respectively, with permissions.
Mentions: Generally, an interferogram or hologram, in which the optical field information of the sample is modulated with a reference beam (Figure 2), is digitally recorded by an imaging device such as a charge-coupled device (CCD), and the optical field information is then retrieved by appropriate field retrieval algorithms. Depending on the modulation method, QPI techniques can be mainly grouped into either the temporal modulation or spatial modulation.

Bottom Line: A cellular-level study of the pathophysiology is crucial for understanding the mechanisms behind human diseases.Recent advances in quantitative phase imaging (QPI) techniques show promises for the cellular-level understanding of the pathophysiology of diseases.To provide important insight on how the QPI techniques potentially improve the study of cell pathophysiology, here we present the principles of QPI and highlight some of the recent applications of QPI ranging from cell homeostasis to infectious diseases and cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701, Korea. kyeo@kaist.ac.kr

ABSTRACT
A cellular-level study of the pathophysiology is crucial for understanding the mechanisms behind human diseases. Recent advances in quantitative phase imaging (QPI) techniques show promises for the cellular-level understanding of the pathophysiology of diseases. To provide important insight on how the QPI techniques potentially improve the study of cell pathophysiology, here we present the principles of QPI and highlight some of the recent applications of QPI ranging from cell homeostasis to infectious diseases and cancer.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus