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A two-dimensional laser scanning mirror using motion-decoupling electromagnetic actuators.

Shin BH, Oh D, Lee SY - Sensors (Basel) (2013)

Bottom Line: The upper moving-coil type actuator to rotate only the mirror part has the optical reflection angle of 15.7° at 10 Hz, 90° at the resonance frequency of 60 Hz at ±3 V (±70 mA) and the bandwidth of 91 Hz.The lower moving-magnet type actuator has the optical reflection angle of 16.20° at 10 Hz and 50° at the resonance frequency of 60 Hz at ±5 V (±34 mA) and the bandwidth of 88 Hz.The proposed compact and simple 2-D scanning mirror has advantages of large 2-D angular deflections, wide frequency bandwidth and low manufacturing cost.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742, Korea.

ABSTRACT
This work proposes a two-dimensional (2-D) laser scanning mirror with a novel actuating structure composed of one magnet and two coils. The mirror-actuating device generates decoupled scanning motions about two orthogonal axes by combining two electromagnetic actuators of the conventional moving-coil and the moving-magnet types. We implement a finite element analysis to calculate magnetic flux in the electromagnetic system and experiments using a prototype with the overall size of 22 mm (W) × 20 mm (D) × 15 mm (H) for the mirror size of 8 mm × 8 mm. The upper moving-coil type actuator to rotate only the mirror part has the optical reflection angle of 15.7° at 10 Hz, 90° at the resonance frequency of 60 Hz at ±3 V (±70 mA) and the bandwidth of 91 Hz. The lower moving-magnet type actuator has the optical reflection angle of 16.20° at 10 Hz and 50° at the resonance frequency of 60 Hz at ±5 V (±34 mA) and the bandwidth of 88 Hz. The proposed compact and simple 2-D scanning mirror has advantages of large 2-D angular deflections, wide frequency bandwidth and low manufacturing cost.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Experiment and simulation results of torque constants. (a) X-axis, (b) Y-axis.
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f5-sensors-13-04146: Experiment and simulation results of torque constants. (a) X-axis, (b) Y-axis.

Mentions: The restoring and torque constants Km and Kt at each axis are measured and the experimental results are compared with the FEA simulations in Figures 4 and 5, respectively. In order to obtain the restoring and torque constants at each axis, we measure torques about two axes as a function of the rotational angle and input current. Firstly, magnetic forces are measured using the load cell for the cases of different rotational angles with zero current at each coil. Here, the torque becomes the measured force multiplied by the distance from the axis to the measured point of mirror. Then the restoring constant Km is calculated from the linear Equation (2), which is the slope of the torque-angle curve in Figure 4.


A two-dimensional laser scanning mirror using motion-decoupling electromagnetic actuators.

Shin BH, Oh D, Lee SY - Sensors (Basel) (2013)

Experiment and simulation results of torque constants. (a) X-axis, (b) Y-axis.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3673076&req=5

f5-sensors-13-04146: Experiment and simulation results of torque constants. (a) X-axis, (b) Y-axis.
Mentions: The restoring and torque constants Km and Kt at each axis are measured and the experimental results are compared with the FEA simulations in Figures 4 and 5, respectively. In order to obtain the restoring and torque constants at each axis, we measure torques about two axes as a function of the rotational angle and input current. Firstly, magnetic forces are measured using the load cell for the cases of different rotational angles with zero current at each coil. Here, the torque becomes the measured force multiplied by the distance from the axis to the measured point of mirror. Then the restoring constant Km is calculated from the linear Equation (2), which is the slope of the torque-angle curve in Figure 4.

Bottom Line: The upper moving-coil type actuator to rotate only the mirror part has the optical reflection angle of 15.7° at 10 Hz, 90° at the resonance frequency of 60 Hz at ±3 V (±70 mA) and the bandwidth of 91 Hz.The lower moving-magnet type actuator has the optical reflection angle of 16.20° at 10 Hz and 50° at the resonance frequency of 60 Hz at ±5 V (±34 mA) and the bandwidth of 88 Hz.The proposed compact and simple 2-D scanning mirror has advantages of large 2-D angular deflections, wide frequency bandwidth and low manufacturing cost.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742, Korea.

ABSTRACT
This work proposes a two-dimensional (2-D) laser scanning mirror with a novel actuating structure composed of one magnet and two coils. The mirror-actuating device generates decoupled scanning motions about two orthogonal axes by combining two electromagnetic actuators of the conventional moving-coil and the moving-magnet types. We implement a finite element analysis to calculate magnetic flux in the electromagnetic system and experiments using a prototype with the overall size of 22 mm (W) × 20 mm (D) × 15 mm (H) for the mirror size of 8 mm × 8 mm. The upper moving-coil type actuator to rotate only the mirror part has the optical reflection angle of 15.7° at 10 Hz, 90° at the resonance frequency of 60 Hz at ±3 V (±70 mA) and the bandwidth of 91 Hz. The lower moving-magnet type actuator has the optical reflection angle of 16.20° at 10 Hz and 50° at the resonance frequency of 60 Hz at ±5 V (±34 mA) and the bandwidth of 88 Hz. The proposed compact and simple 2-D scanning mirror has advantages of large 2-D angular deflections, wide frequency bandwidth and low manufacturing cost.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus