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Residential proximity to methyl bromide use and birth outcomes in an agricultural population in California.

Gemmill A, Gunier RB, Bradman A, Eskenazi B, Harley KG - Environ. Health Perspect. (2013)

Bottom Line: High methyl bromide use (vs. no use) within 5 km of the home during the second trimester was negatively associated with birth weight (β = -113.1 g; CI: -218.1, -8.1), birth length (β = -0.85 cm; CI: -1.44, -0.27), and head circumference (β = -0.33 cm; CI: -0.67, 0.01).These outcomes were also associated with moderate methyl bromide use during the second trimester.Residential proximity to methyl bromide use during the second trimester was associated with markers of restricted fetal growth in our study.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Demography, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94704 , USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Methyl bromide, a fungicide often used in strawberry cultivation, is of concern for residents who live near agricultural applications because of its toxicity and potential for drift. Little is known about the effects of methyl bromide exposure during pregnancy.

Objective: We investigated the relationship between residential proximity to methyl bromide use and birth outcomes.

Methods: Participants were from the CHAMACOS (Center for the Health Assessment of Mothers and Children of Salinas) study (n = 442), a longitudinal cohort study examining the health effects of environmental exposures on pregnant women and their children in an agricultural community in northern California. Using data from the California Pesticide Use Reporting system, we employed a geographic information system to estimate the amount of methyl bromide applied within 5 km of a woman's residence during pregnancy. Multiple linear regression models were used to estimate associations between trimester-specific proximity to use and birth weight, length, head circumference, and gestational age.

Results: High methyl bromide use (vs. no use) within 5 km of the home during the second trimester was negatively associated with birth weight (β = -113.1 g; CI: -218.1, -8.1), birth length (β = -0.85 cm; CI: -1.44, -0.27), and head circumference (β = -0.33 cm; CI: -0.67, 0.01). These outcomes were also associated with moderate methyl bromide use during the second trimester. Negative associations with fetal growth parameters were stronger when larger (5 km and 8 km) versus smaller (1 km and 3 km) buffer zones were used to estimate exposure.

Conclusions: Residential proximity to methyl bromide use during the second trimester was associated with markers of restricted fetal growth in our study.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Methods used to determine proximity to methyl bromide use from the California PUR system by section of the PLSS grid illustrated for 3-, 5-, and 8‑km radius buffers around a residence (•). Data source: California Department of Pesticide Regulation (2012b).
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f2: Methods used to determine proximity to methyl bromide use from the California PUR system by section of the PLSS grid illustrated for 3-, 5-, and 8‑km radius buffers around a residence (•). Data source: California Department of Pesticide Regulation (2012b).

Mentions: For each woman, we calculated the amount of methyl bromide applied within a 5-km radius around her home using a geographic information system (GIS). Detailed descriptions of the equations and methods that were used to calculate pesticide use have been published previously (Gunier et al. 2011; Nuckols et al. 2007). Briefly, we calculated nearby methyl bromide by summing the kilograms applied in all 1.6 km × 1.6 km PLSS sections that fell within 5 km of the maternal residence (Figure 2). For sections that intersected the 5-km buffer, we weighted the amount of methyl bromide applied in that section by the proportion of land area that was included in the buffer. We summed these totals over each day of a trimester interval, yielding an estimate of the total amount of methyl bromide (kilograms) applied within 5 km of the maternal residence during each trimester of pregnancy.


Residential proximity to methyl bromide use and birth outcomes in an agricultural population in California.

Gemmill A, Gunier RB, Bradman A, Eskenazi B, Harley KG - Environ. Health Perspect. (2013)

Methods used to determine proximity to methyl bromide use from the California PUR system by section of the PLSS grid illustrated for 3-, 5-, and 8‑km radius buffers around a residence (•). Data source: California Department of Pesticide Regulation (2012b).
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3672911&req=5

f2: Methods used to determine proximity to methyl bromide use from the California PUR system by section of the PLSS grid illustrated for 3-, 5-, and 8‑km radius buffers around a residence (•). Data source: California Department of Pesticide Regulation (2012b).
Mentions: For each woman, we calculated the amount of methyl bromide applied within a 5-km radius around her home using a geographic information system (GIS). Detailed descriptions of the equations and methods that were used to calculate pesticide use have been published previously (Gunier et al. 2011; Nuckols et al. 2007). Briefly, we calculated nearby methyl bromide by summing the kilograms applied in all 1.6 km × 1.6 km PLSS sections that fell within 5 km of the maternal residence (Figure 2). For sections that intersected the 5-km buffer, we weighted the amount of methyl bromide applied in that section by the proportion of land area that was included in the buffer. We summed these totals over each day of a trimester interval, yielding an estimate of the total amount of methyl bromide (kilograms) applied within 5 km of the maternal residence during each trimester of pregnancy.

Bottom Line: High methyl bromide use (vs. no use) within 5 km of the home during the second trimester was negatively associated with birth weight (β = -113.1 g; CI: -218.1, -8.1), birth length (β = -0.85 cm; CI: -1.44, -0.27), and head circumference (β = -0.33 cm; CI: -0.67, 0.01).These outcomes were also associated with moderate methyl bromide use during the second trimester.Residential proximity to methyl bromide use during the second trimester was associated with markers of restricted fetal growth in our study.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Demography, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94704 , USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Methyl bromide, a fungicide often used in strawberry cultivation, is of concern for residents who live near agricultural applications because of its toxicity and potential for drift. Little is known about the effects of methyl bromide exposure during pregnancy.

Objective: We investigated the relationship between residential proximity to methyl bromide use and birth outcomes.

Methods: Participants were from the CHAMACOS (Center for the Health Assessment of Mothers and Children of Salinas) study (n = 442), a longitudinal cohort study examining the health effects of environmental exposures on pregnant women and their children in an agricultural community in northern California. Using data from the California Pesticide Use Reporting system, we employed a geographic information system to estimate the amount of methyl bromide applied within 5 km of a woman's residence during pregnancy. Multiple linear regression models were used to estimate associations between trimester-specific proximity to use and birth weight, length, head circumference, and gestational age.

Results: High methyl bromide use (vs. no use) within 5 km of the home during the second trimester was negatively associated with birth weight (β = -113.1 g; CI: -218.1, -8.1), birth length (β = -0.85 cm; CI: -1.44, -0.27), and head circumference (β = -0.33 cm; CI: -0.67, 0.01). These outcomes were also associated with moderate methyl bromide use during the second trimester. Negative associations with fetal growth parameters were stronger when larger (5 km and 8 km) versus smaller (1 km and 3 km) buffer zones were used to estimate exposure.

Conclusions: Residential proximity to methyl bromide use during the second trimester was associated with markers of restricted fetal growth in our study.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus