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Circulating fatty acid binding protein as a marker of intestinal failure in septic patients.

Machado MC, Barbeiro HV, Pinheiro da Silva F, de Souza HP - Crit Care (2012)

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Intestinal hypoperfusion in sepsis may result in loss of gut barrier and bacterial translocation, further complicating the already severe septic state... However, the influence of renal failure on plasma citrulline levels must be re-evaluated... Circulating intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP or FABP6) has been found to be an early marker of intestinal necrosis after aortic surgery, after Pringle maneuver in liver surgery and in acute pancreatitis... We observed a significant elevation of serum levels of I-FABP in patients with septic shock when compared with healthy controls (Figure 1)... Intestinal dysfunction in critically ill patients is difficult to evaluate and is probably common, despite underestimation... I-FABP is a 15 kDa protein located at the tips of intestinal mucosal villi and is usually undetected in the plasma circulation... We assume that I-FABP may constitute a useful marker for acute intestinal failure in critically ill patients... Future studies in larger cohorts of critically ill patients may confirm these results and validate I-FABP as a marker of intestinal failure, integrating this system into the evaluation and treatment of critically ill septic patients... I-FABP: intestinal fatty acid binding protein... The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

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Intestinal fatty acid binding protein plasma levels in critically ill patients and healthy controls.
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Figure 1: Intestinal fatty acid binding protein plasma levels in critically ill patients and healthy controls.

Mentions: We observed a significant elevation of serum levels of I-FABP in patients with septic shock when compared with healthy controls (Figure 1).


Circulating fatty acid binding protein as a marker of intestinal failure in septic patients.

Machado MC, Barbeiro HV, Pinheiro da Silva F, de Souza HP - Crit Care (2012)

Intestinal fatty acid binding protein plasma levels in critically ill patients and healthy controls.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3672560&req=5

Figure 1: Intestinal fatty acid binding protein plasma levels in critically ill patients and healthy controls.
Mentions: We observed a significant elevation of serum levels of I-FABP in patients with septic shock when compared with healthy controls (Figure 1).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Intestinal hypoperfusion in sepsis may result in loss of gut barrier and bacterial translocation, further complicating the already severe septic state... However, the influence of renal failure on plasma citrulline levels must be re-evaluated... Circulating intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP or FABP6) has been found to be an early marker of intestinal necrosis after aortic surgery, after Pringle maneuver in liver surgery and in acute pancreatitis... We observed a significant elevation of serum levels of I-FABP in patients with septic shock when compared with healthy controls (Figure 1)... Intestinal dysfunction in critically ill patients is difficult to evaluate and is probably common, despite underestimation... I-FABP is a 15 kDa protein located at the tips of intestinal mucosal villi and is usually undetected in the plasma circulation... We assume that I-FABP may constitute a useful marker for acute intestinal failure in critically ill patients... Future studies in larger cohorts of critically ill patients may confirm these results and validate I-FABP as a marker of intestinal failure, integrating this system into the evaluation and treatment of critically ill septic patients... I-FABP: intestinal fatty acid binding protein... The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus