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Peer-education intervention to reduce injection risk behaviors benefits high-risk young injection drug users: a latent transition analysis of the CIDUS 3/DUIT study.

Mackesy-Amiti ME, Finnegan L, Ouellet LJ, Golub ET, Hagan H, Hudson SM, Latka MH, Garfein RS - AIDS Behav (2013)

Bottom Line: Applying categorical latent variable analysis (mixture modeling) to baseline injection risk behavior data, we identified four distinct classes of injection-related HIV/HCV risk: low risk, non-syringe equipment-sharing, moderate-risk syringe-sharing, and high-risk syringe-sharing.Adjusting for gender, age, and race/ethnicity, a significant intervention effect was found only for the high-risk class.Young IDU who exhibited high-risk behavior at baseline were 90% more likely to be in the low-risk class at follow-up after the PEI intervention, compared to the control group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA. mmamiti@uic.edu

ABSTRACT
We analyzed data from a large randomized HIV/HCV prevention intervention trial with young injection drug users (IDUs) conducted in five U.S. cities. The trial compared a peer education intervention (PEI) with a time-matched, attention control group. Applying categorical latent variable analysis (mixture modeling) to baseline injection risk behavior data, we identified four distinct classes of injection-related HIV/HCV risk: low risk, non-syringe equipment-sharing, moderate-risk syringe-sharing, and high-risk syringe-sharing. The trial participation rate did not vary across classes. We conducted a latent transition analysis using trial baseline and 6-month follow-up data, to test the effect of the intervention on transitions to the low-risk class at follow-up. Adjusting for gender, age, and race/ethnicity, a significant intervention effect was found only for the high-risk class. Young IDU who exhibited high-risk behavior at baseline were 90% more likely to be in the low-risk class at follow-up after the PEI intervention, compared to the control group.

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Four latent classes of injection risk behavior
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Fig2: Four latent classes of injection risk behavior

Mentions: Figure 2 shows the unique patterns of injection risk behaviors for each class in the four class model: (1) overall low risk (33 %), (2) equipment sharing (22 %), (3) moderate risk characterized by low-frequency sharing of syringes (19 %), and (4) overall high risk (27 %). For each class, the x-axis includes the seven risk behaviors, and the y-axis represents the probabilities of high (solid lines) and low frequency (dashed lines) responses for each risk behavior. The five-class model (not shown) split the equipment sharing class into two classes, one that shared equipment often, and one that shared infrequently.Fig. 2


Peer-education intervention to reduce injection risk behaviors benefits high-risk young injection drug users: a latent transition analysis of the CIDUS 3/DUIT study.

Mackesy-Amiti ME, Finnegan L, Ouellet LJ, Golub ET, Hagan H, Hudson SM, Latka MH, Garfein RS - AIDS Behav (2013)

Four latent classes of injection risk behavior
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3672505&req=5

Fig2: Four latent classes of injection risk behavior
Mentions: Figure 2 shows the unique patterns of injection risk behaviors for each class in the four class model: (1) overall low risk (33 %), (2) equipment sharing (22 %), (3) moderate risk characterized by low-frequency sharing of syringes (19 %), and (4) overall high risk (27 %). For each class, the x-axis includes the seven risk behaviors, and the y-axis represents the probabilities of high (solid lines) and low frequency (dashed lines) responses for each risk behavior. The five-class model (not shown) split the equipment sharing class into two classes, one that shared equipment often, and one that shared infrequently.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Applying categorical latent variable analysis (mixture modeling) to baseline injection risk behavior data, we identified four distinct classes of injection-related HIV/HCV risk: low risk, non-syringe equipment-sharing, moderate-risk syringe-sharing, and high-risk syringe-sharing.Adjusting for gender, age, and race/ethnicity, a significant intervention effect was found only for the high-risk class.Young IDU who exhibited high-risk behavior at baseline were 90% more likely to be in the low-risk class at follow-up after the PEI intervention, compared to the control group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA. mmamiti@uic.edu

ABSTRACT
We analyzed data from a large randomized HIV/HCV prevention intervention trial with young injection drug users (IDUs) conducted in five U.S. cities. The trial compared a peer education intervention (PEI) with a time-matched, attention control group. Applying categorical latent variable analysis (mixture modeling) to baseline injection risk behavior data, we identified four distinct classes of injection-related HIV/HCV risk: low risk, non-syringe equipment-sharing, moderate-risk syringe-sharing, and high-risk syringe-sharing. The trial participation rate did not vary across classes. We conducted a latent transition analysis using trial baseline and 6-month follow-up data, to test the effect of the intervention on transitions to the low-risk class at follow-up. Adjusting for gender, age, and race/ethnicity, a significant intervention effect was found only for the high-risk class. Young IDU who exhibited high-risk behavior at baseline were 90% more likely to be in the low-risk class at follow-up after the PEI intervention, compared to the control group.

Show MeSH