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View Article: PubMed Central

ABSTRACT

The fundamental role of actin in transcription

Cancer immunotherapy: mRNA as an off-the-shelf vaccine 

DNA methylation contributes to altered miRNA expression profiles in cervical cancer

miRNAs contribute to autophagy in cancer

No MeSH data available.


Figure 4. Cell Cycle 2013; 12(2).
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 4: Figure 4. Cell Cycle 2013; 12(2).

Mentions: Autophagy is a catabolic process that allows cellular macromolecules to be broken down and recycled into metabolic precursors. It is a highly conserved, critical process, allowing cells to gain survival advantages under various stress situations due to growth and environmental changes. Mounting evidence indicates that the post-transcriptional and translational controls mediated by non-coding miRNAs (miRs) contribute significantly to autophagy in cancer. Such acute modulation of protein synthesis mediated by miRs provides cells with advantages in response to starvation, genotoxic stress and hypoxia. A recent Review by Dr Jingfang Ju and colleagues highlights some of the important discoveries and molecular insights of miRs in regulating autophagy based on various cancer models. The authors conclude that modulating miRs might open a new direction to change cancer cells in response to stress by altering the autophagy process and, in turn, could provide new therapeutic strategies to overcome chemoresistance.1Figure 4.


Landes Highlights
Figure 4. Cell Cycle 2013; 12(2).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3672273&req=5

Figure 4: Figure 4. Cell Cycle 2013; 12(2).
Mentions: Autophagy is a catabolic process that allows cellular macromolecules to be broken down and recycled into metabolic precursors. It is a highly conserved, critical process, allowing cells to gain survival advantages under various stress situations due to growth and environmental changes. Mounting evidence indicates that the post-transcriptional and translational controls mediated by non-coding miRNAs (miRs) contribute significantly to autophagy in cancer. Such acute modulation of protein synthesis mediated by miRs provides cells with advantages in response to starvation, genotoxic stress and hypoxia. A recent Review by Dr Jingfang Ju and colleagues highlights some of the important discoveries and molecular insights of miRs in regulating autophagy based on various cancer models. The authors conclude that modulating miRs might open a new direction to change cancer cells in response to stress by altering the autophagy process and, in turn, could provide new therapeutic strategies to overcome chemoresistance.1Figure 4.

View Article: PubMed Central

ABSTRACT

The fundamental role of actin in transcription

Cancer immunotherapy: mRNA as an off-the-shelf vaccine 

DNA methylation contributes to altered miRNA expression profiles in cervical cancer

miRNAs contribute to autophagy in cancer

No MeSH data available.