Limits...
Landes Highlights

View Article: PubMed Central

ABSTRACT

The fundamental role of actin in transcription

Cancer immunotherapy: mRNA as an off-the-shelf vaccine 

DNA methylation contributes to altered miRNA expression profiles in cervical cancer

miRNAs contribute to autophagy in cancer

No MeSH data available.


Figure 2. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics 2013; 9(2).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3672273&req=5

Figure 2: Figure 2. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics 2013; 9(2).

Mentions: Two decades ago, mRNA became the focus of research in molecular medicine and was proposed as an active pharmaceutical ingredient for the therapy of cancer. In this regard, mRNA has been mainly used for ex vivo modification of antigen-presenting cells (APCs), such as dendritic cells (DCs). This vaccination strategy has proven to be safe, well-tolerated and capable of inducing tumor antigen-specific immune responses. Recently, the direct application of mRNA for in situ modification of APCs, hence immunization, was shown to be feasible and at least as effective as DC-based immunization in pre-clinical models. The application of mRNA as an off-the-shelf vaccine could represent an important step in the development of future cancer immunotherapeutic strategies. In a recent commentary, Dr Karine Breckpot and coworkers discuss the use of ex vivo mRNA-modified DCs and “naked mRNA” for cancer immunotherapy focusing on parameters such as the employed DC subtype, DC activation stimulus and route of immunization. In addition, the authors provide an overview on the clinical trials published so far, trying to link their outcome to the aforementioned parameters.1Figure 2.


Landes Highlights
Figure 2. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics 2013; 9(2).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3672273&req=5

Figure 2: Figure 2. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics 2013; 9(2).
Mentions: Two decades ago, mRNA became the focus of research in molecular medicine and was proposed as an active pharmaceutical ingredient for the therapy of cancer. In this regard, mRNA has been mainly used for ex vivo modification of antigen-presenting cells (APCs), such as dendritic cells (DCs). This vaccination strategy has proven to be safe, well-tolerated and capable of inducing tumor antigen-specific immune responses. Recently, the direct application of mRNA for in situ modification of APCs, hence immunization, was shown to be feasible and at least as effective as DC-based immunization in pre-clinical models. The application of mRNA as an off-the-shelf vaccine could represent an important step in the development of future cancer immunotherapeutic strategies. In a recent commentary, Dr Karine Breckpot and coworkers discuss the use of ex vivo mRNA-modified DCs and “naked mRNA” for cancer immunotherapy focusing on parameters such as the employed DC subtype, DC activation stimulus and route of immunization. In addition, the authors provide an overview on the clinical trials published so far, trying to link their outcome to the aforementioned parameters.1Figure 2.

View Article: PubMed Central

ABSTRACT

The fundamental role of actin in transcription

Cancer immunotherapy: mRNA as an off-the-shelf vaccine 

DNA methylation contributes to altered miRNA expression profiles in cervical cancer

miRNAs contribute to autophagy in cancer

No MeSH data available.