Limits...
Adaptability and persistence of the emerging pathogen Bordetella petrii.

Zelazny AM, Ding L, Goldberg JB, Mijares LA, Conlan S, Conville PS, Stock F, Ballentine SJ, Olivier KN, Sampaio EP, Murray PR, Holland SM - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: Strains were compared genetically, phenotypically and by antibody recognition from the patient and from inoculated mice.Finally, we characterize one strain that was poorly recognized by the patient's antibodies, due to a defect in the lipopolysaccharide O-antigen, and identify a mutation associated with this phenotype.We propose that B. petrii is remarkably adaptable in vivo, providing a possible connection between immune response and bacterial evasion and supporting infection persistence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Clinical Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. azelazny@mail.nih.gov

ABSTRACT
The first described, environmentally isolated, Bordetella petrii was shown to undergo massive genomic rearrangements in vitro. More recently, B. petrii was isolated from clinical samples associated with jaw, ear bone, cystic fibrosis and chronic pulmonary disease. However, the in vivo consequences of B. petrii genome plasticity and its pathogenicity remain obscure. B. petrii was identified from four sequential respiratory samples and a post-mortem spleen sample of a woman presenting with bronchiectasis and cavitary lung disease associated with nontuberculous mycobacterial infection. Strains were compared genetically, phenotypically and by antibody recognition from the patient and from inoculated mice. The successive B. petrii strains exhibited differences in growth, antibiotic susceptibility and recognition by the patient's antibodies. Antibodies from mice inoculated with these strains recapitulated the specificity and strain dependent response that was seen with the patient's serum. Finally, we characterize one strain that was poorly recognized by the patient's antibodies, due to a defect in the lipopolysaccharide O-antigen, and identify a mutation associated with this phenotype. We propose that B. petrii is remarkably adaptable in vivo, providing a possible connection between immune response and bacterial evasion and supporting infection persistence.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Serum susceptibility of B. petrii 1 and B. petrii 3.Bacterial colonies grown on SBA were resuspended in 1% proteose peptone - phosphate-buffered saline (PP-PBS) to a concentration of 1×107 CFU/ml. A 100-µl aliquot was then combined with an equal volume of 10% normal human serum (NHS) diluted in 1% PP-PBS. A 1% PP-PBS (0% serum) solution and heat-inactivated (56°C for 1 hour) normal human serum (HI-NHS) served as controls. Samples were incubated for 2 hours at 37°C with shaking. After incubation, samples were serially diluted, plated onto sheep blood agar plates, and grown 24–48 h at 37°C to determine the number of CFU and calculate % of survival.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3672207&req=5

pone-0065102-g006: Serum susceptibility of B. petrii 1 and B. petrii 3.Bacterial colonies grown on SBA were resuspended in 1% proteose peptone - phosphate-buffered saline (PP-PBS) to a concentration of 1×107 CFU/ml. A 100-µl aliquot was then combined with an equal volume of 10% normal human serum (NHS) diluted in 1% PP-PBS. A 1% PP-PBS (0% serum) solution and heat-inactivated (56°C for 1 hour) normal human serum (HI-NHS) served as controls. Samples were incubated for 2 hours at 37°C with shaking. After incubation, samples were serially diluted, plated onto sheep blood agar plates, and grown 24–48 h at 37°C to determine the number of CFU and calculate % of survival.

Mentions: Since O-antigen plays an important role in resistance to complement-mediated serum killing, we sought to compare the serum sensitivity of O-antigen containing B. petrii 1 with O-antigen deficient B. petrii 3. As seen in Fig. 6, B. petrii 3 was dramatically more susceptible to normal human serum than B. petrii 1 with only 0.03% survival compared to 41% for B. petrii 1. Serum sensitivity was not observed with heat-inactivated serum indicating that this effect was complement dependent.


Adaptability and persistence of the emerging pathogen Bordetella petrii.

Zelazny AM, Ding L, Goldberg JB, Mijares LA, Conlan S, Conville PS, Stock F, Ballentine SJ, Olivier KN, Sampaio EP, Murray PR, Holland SM - PLoS ONE (2013)

Serum susceptibility of B. petrii 1 and B. petrii 3.Bacterial colonies grown on SBA were resuspended in 1% proteose peptone - phosphate-buffered saline (PP-PBS) to a concentration of 1×107 CFU/ml. A 100-µl aliquot was then combined with an equal volume of 10% normal human serum (NHS) diluted in 1% PP-PBS. A 1% PP-PBS (0% serum) solution and heat-inactivated (56°C for 1 hour) normal human serum (HI-NHS) served as controls. Samples were incubated for 2 hours at 37°C with shaking. After incubation, samples were serially diluted, plated onto sheep blood agar plates, and grown 24–48 h at 37°C to determine the number of CFU and calculate % of survival.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3672207&req=5

pone-0065102-g006: Serum susceptibility of B. petrii 1 and B. petrii 3.Bacterial colonies grown on SBA were resuspended in 1% proteose peptone - phosphate-buffered saline (PP-PBS) to a concentration of 1×107 CFU/ml. A 100-µl aliquot was then combined with an equal volume of 10% normal human serum (NHS) diluted in 1% PP-PBS. A 1% PP-PBS (0% serum) solution and heat-inactivated (56°C for 1 hour) normal human serum (HI-NHS) served as controls. Samples were incubated for 2 hours at 37°C with shaking. After incubation, samples were serially diluted, plated onto sheep blood agar plates, and grown 24–48 h at 37°C to determine the number of CFU and calculate % of survival.
Mentions: Since O-antigen plays an important role in resistance to complement-mediated serum killing, we sought to compare the serum sensitivity of O-antigen containing B. petrii 1 with O-antigen deficient B. petrii 3. As seen in Fig. 6, B. petrii 3 was dramatically more susceptible to normal human serum than B. petrii 1 with only 0.03% survival compared to 41% for B. petrii 1. Serum sensitivity was not observed with heat-inactivated serum indicating that this effect was complement dependent.

Bottom Line: Strains were compared genetically, phenotypically and by antibody recognition from the patient and from inoculated mice.Finally, we characterize one strain that was poorly recognized by the patient's antibodies, due to a defect in the lipopolysaccharide O-antigen, and identify a mutation associated with this phenotype.We propose that B. petrii is remarkably adaptable in vivo, providing a possible connection between immune response and bacterial evasion and supporting infection persistence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Clinical Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. azelazny@mail.nih.gov

ABSTRACT
The first described, environmentally isolated, Bordetella petrii was shown to undergo massive genomic rearrangements in vitro. More recently, B. petrii was isolated from clinical samples associated with jaw, ear bone, cystic fibrosis and chronic pulmonary disease. However, the in vivo consequences of B. petrii genome plasticity and its pathogenicity remain obscure. B. petrii was identified from four sequential respiratory samples and a post-mortem spleen sample of a woman presenting with bronchiectasis and cavitary lung disease associated with nontuberculous mycobacterial infection. Strains were compared genetically, phenotypically and by antibody recognition from the patient and from inoculated mice. The successive B. petrii strains exhibited differences in growth, antibiotic susceptibility and recognition by the patient's antibodies. Antibodies from mice inoculated with these strains recapitulated the specificity and strain dependent response that was seen with the patient's serum. Finally, we characterize one strain that was poorly recognized by the patient's antibodies, due to a defect in the lipopolysaccharide O-antigen, and identify a mutation associated with this phenotype. We propose that B. petrii is remarkably adaptable in vivo, providing a possible connection between immune response and bacterial evasion and supporting infection persistence.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus