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Effects of feed supplementation on mineral composition, mechanical properties and structure in femurs of Iberian red deer hinds (Cervus elaphus hispanicus).

Olguin CA, Landete-Castillejos T, Ceacero F, García AJ, Gallego L - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: Whole body measures were also recorded on the hinds.Supplemental feeding increased Mn content of bone by 23%, Cu by 9% and Zn by 6%.Thus, greater availability of microminerals but not major minerals in the diet is reflected in bone composition even before marked body effects, bone macro-structure or its mechanical properties are affected.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Animal Science Tech, Applied to Wildlife Management Res.Group, IREC Sec. Albacete, IREC (UCLM-CSIC-JCCM), Campus UCLM, Albacete, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Few studies in wild animals have assessed changes in mineral profile in long bones and their implications for mechanical properties. We examined the effect of two diets differing in mineral content on the composition and mechanical properties of femora from two groups each with 13 free-ranging red deer hinds. Contents of Ca, P, Mg, K, Na, S, Cu, Fe, Mn, Se, Zn, B and Sr, Young's modulus of elasticity (E), bending strength and work of fracture were assessed in the proximal part of the diaphysis (PD) and the mid-diaphysis (MD). Whole body measures were also recorded on the hinds. Compared to animals on control diets, those on supplemented diets increased live weight by 6.5 kg and their kidney fat index (KFI), but not carcass weight, body or organ size, femur size or cortical thickness. Supplemental feeding increased Mn content of bone by 23%, Cu by 9% and Zn by 6%. These differences showed a mean fourfold greater content of these minerals in supplemental diet, whereas femora did not reflect a 5.4 times greater content of major minerals (Na and P) in the diet. Lower content of B and Sr in supplemented diet also reduced femur B by 14% and Sr by 5%. There was a subtle effect of diet only on E and none on other mechanical properties. Thus, greater availability of microminerals but not major minerals in the diet is reflected in bone composition even before marked body effects, bone macro-structure or its mechanical properties are affected.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Sections of the femur sampled for chemical analysis (arrows) and mechanical testing (femur bars 45 mm×2.5 mm×4.5 mm indicated in the drawing).
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pone-0065461-g001: Sections of the femur sampled for chemical analysis (arrows) and mechanical testing (femur bars 45 mm×2.5 mm×4.5 mm indicated in the drawing).

Mentions: Left and right femora were removed and stored in a freezer until experimental processing. Each femur was then manually cleaned of adhering soft tissue or other material. Femur length was measured with a digital calliper using standard measurement protocols. The complete femur was cut in 3 parts of similar length with a hand-held drill equipped with a saw blade (Dremel Series 3000, Illinois, USA): upper third or proximal part of diaphysis (PD; Figure 1), central part or mid-diaphysis (MD) and lower third (distal diaphysis). For subsequent analyses we used PD and MD because they probably have slightly different functions and so these sections may have both different mechanical properties and mineral composition. Sawing was performed under running tap water to avoid overheating of the bone tissue.


Effects of feed supplementation on mineral composition, mechanical properties and structure in femurs of Iberian red deer hinds (Cervus elaphus hispanicus).

Olguin CA, Landete-Castillejos T, Ceacero F, García AJ, Gallego L - PLoS ONE (2013)

Sections of the femur sampled for chemical analysis (arrows) and mechanical testing (femur bars 45 mm×2.5 mm×4.5 mm indicated in the drawing).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3672206&req=5

pone-0065461-g001: Sections of the femur sampled for chemical analysis (arrows) and mechanical testing (femur bars 45 mm×2.5 mm×4.5 mm indicated in the drawing).
Mentions: Left and right femora were removed and stored in a freezer until experimental processing. Each femur was then manually cleaned of adhering soft tissue or other material. Femur length was measured with a digital calliper using standard measurement protocols. The complete femur was cut in 3 parts of similar length with a hand-held drill equipped with a saw blade (Dremel Series 3000, Illinois, USA): upper third or proximal part of diaphysis (PD; Figure 1), central part or mid-diaphysis (MD) and lower third (distal diaphysis). For subsequent analyses we used PD and MD because they probably have slightly different functions and so these sections may have both different mechanical properties and mineral composition. Sawing was performed under running tap water to avoid overheating of the bone tissue.

Bottom Line: Whole body measures were also recorded on the hinds.Supplemental feeding increased Mn content of bone by 23%, Cu by 9% and Zn by 6%.Thus, greater availability of microminerals but not major minerals in the diet is reflected in bone composition even before marked body effects, bone macro-structure or its mechanical properties are affected.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Animal Science Tech, Applied to Wildlife Management Res.Group, IREC Sec. Albacete, IREC (UCLM-CSIC-JCCM), Campus UCLM, Albacete, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Few studies in wild animals have assessed changes in mineral profile in long bones and their implications for mechanical properties. We examined the effect of two diets differing in mineral content on the composition and mechanical properties of femora from two groups each with 13 free-ranging red deer hinds. Contents of Ca, P, Mg, K, Na, S, Cu, Fe, Mn, Se, Zn, B and Sr, Young's modulus of elasticity (E), bending strength and work of fracture were assessed in the proximal part of the diaphysis (PD) and the mid-diaphysis (MD). Whole body measures were also recorded on the hinds. Compared to animals on control diets, those on supplemented diets increased live weight by 6.5 kg and their kidney fat index (KFI), but not carcass weight, body or organ size, femur size or cortical thickness. Supplemental feeding increased Mn content of bone by 23%, Cu by 9% and Zn by 6%. These differences showed a mean fourfold greater content of these minerals in supplemental diet, whereas femora did not reflect a 5.4 times greater content of major minerals (Na and P) in the diet. Lower content of B and Sr in supplemented diet also reduced femur B by 14% and Sr by 5%. There was a subtle effect of diet only on E and none on other mechanical properties. Thus, greater availability of microminerals but not major minerals in the diet is reflected in bone composition even before marked body effects, bone macro-structure or its mechanical properties are affected.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus