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Efficient control of epidemics spreading on networks: balance between treatment and recovery.

Oleś K, Gudowska-Nowak E, Kleczkowski A - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: The differences in models affect choice of the strategy only for very cheap treatment and slow spreading disease.However for the combinations of parameters that are important from the epidemiological perspective (high infectiousness and expensive treatment) the models give similar results.Moreover, even where the choice of the strategy is different, the total cost spent on controlling the epidemic is very similar for both models.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: M. Kac Complex Systems Research Center and M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland. kas@cs.stir.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
We analyse two models describing disease transmission and control on regular and small-world networks. We use simulations to find a control strategy that minimizes the total cost of an outbreak, thus balancing the costs of disease against that of the preventive treatment. The models are similar in their epidemiological part, but differ in how the removed/recovered individuals are treated. The differences in models affect choice of the strategy only for very cheap treatment and slow spreading disease. However for the combinations of parameters that are important from the epidemiological perspective (high infectiousness and expensive treatment) the models give similar results. Moreover, even where the choice of the strategy is different, the total cost spent on controlling the epidemic is very similar for both models.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Model scheme of disease transition (black lines) and control (orange lines).In model 2 there is a possible transition between recovered (R) and treated (V) class when R-individual is in the control neighbourhood of any symptomatic D-individual.
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pone-0063813-g002: Model scheme of disease transition (black lines) and control (orange lines).In model 2 there is a possible transition between recovered (R) and treated (V) class when R-individual is in the control neighbourhood of any symptomatic D-individual.

Mentions: The epidemiological SIDRV model is a standard SIR (Susceptible-Infected-Removed) model [26], modified to account for latent period and preventive and responsive treatment (fig. 2), see also [21]. Taking into consideration the latent period, the infectious class is now composed of two separate, pre-symptomatic and symptomatic classes (S, I, D, R and V, respectively). Number of individuals in each class is denoted by , , , , and , respectively, and is the total constant number of individuals in the population.


Efficient control of epidemics spreading on networks: balance between treatment and recovery.

Oleś K, Gudowska-Nowak E, Kleczkowski A - PLoS ONE (2013)

Model scheme of disease transition (black lines) and control (orange lines).In model 2 there is a possible transition between recovered (R) and treated (V) class when R-individual is in the control neighbourhood of any symptomatic D-individual.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3672130&req=5

pone-0063813-g002: Model scheme of disease transition (black lines) and control (orange lines).In model 2 there is a possible transition between recovered (R) and treated (V) class when R-individual is in the control neighbourhood of any symptomatic D-individual.
Mentions: The epidemiological SIDRV model is a standard SIR (Susceptible-Infected-Removed) model [26], modified to account for latent period and preventive and responsive treatment (fig. 2), see also [21]. Taking into consideration the latent period, the infectious class is now composed of two separate, pre-symptomatic and symptomatic classes (S, I, D, R and V, respectively). Number of individuals in each class is denoted by , , , , and , respectively, and is the total constant number of individuals in the population.

Bottom Line: The differences in models affect choice of the strategy only for very cheap treatment and slow spreading disease.However for the combinations of parameters that are important from the epidemiological perspective (high infectiousness and expensive treatment) the models give similar results.Moreover, even where the choice of the strategy is different, the total cost spent on controlling the epidemic is very similar for both models.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: M. Kac Complex Systems Research Center and M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland. kas@cs.stir.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
We analyse two models describing disease transmission and control on regular and small-world networks. We use simulations to find a control strategy that minimizes the total cost of an outbreak, thus balancing the costs of disease against that of the preventive treatment. The models are similar in their epidemiological part, but differ in how the removed/recovered individuals are treated. The differences in models affect choice of the strategy only for very cheap treatment and slow spreading disease. However for the combinations of parameters that are important from the epidemiological perspective (high infectiousness and expensive treatment) the models give similar results. Moreover, even where the choice of the strategy is different, the total cost spent on controlling the epidemic is very similar for both models.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus