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Monitoring functional capability of individuals with lower limb amputations using mobile phones.

Albert MV, McCarthy C, Valentin J, Herrmann M, Kording K, Jayaraman A - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: To be effective, a prescribed prosthetic device must match the functional requirements and capabilities of each patient.Here, we quantify participant activity using mobile phones and relate activity measured during real world activity to the assigned K-levels.We observe a correlation between K-level and the proportion of moderate to high activity over the course of a week.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sensory Motor Performance Program, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA. markvalbert@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
To be effective, a prescribed prosthetic device must match the functional requirements and capabilities of each patient. These capabilities are usually assessed by a clinician and reported by the Medicare K-level designation of mobility. However, it is not clear how the K-level designation objectively relates to the use of prostheses outside of a clinical environment. Here, we quantify participant activity using mobile phones and relate activity measured during real world activity to the assigned K-levels. We observe a correlation between K-level and the proportion of moderate to high activity over the course of a week. This relationship suggests that accelerometry-based technologies such as mobile phones can be used to evaluate real world activity for mobility assessment. Quantifying everyday activity promises to improve assessment of real world prosthesis use, leading to a better matching of prostheses to individuals and enabling better evaluations of future prosthetic devices.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Data acquisition setup.A) The G1 android mobile phone used in this experiment. B) The axes of the tri-axial accelerometer relative to the image in A–xyz as red, green, blue, respectively. C) The phone was placed on the back of the subject so that the three axes pointed up, left, and to the back of the subject, as indicated in D.
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pone-0065340-g001: Data acquisition setup.A) The G1 android mobile phone used in this experiment. B) The axes of the tri-axial accelerometer relative to the image in A–xyz as red, green, blue, respectively. C) The phone was placed on the back of the subject so that the three axes pointed up, left, and to the back of the subject, as indicated in D.

Mentions: The phones were T-mobile G1 phones running Android OS version 1.6. The sampling rate was variable between 15 and 25 Hz, with the higher sampling rate occurring at times of changing acceleration [17]. The phone was positioned such that the accelerometer axes aligned with ‘x’ as vertical (up), ‘y’ as medio-lateral (left), and ‘z’ as antero-posterior (behind) (fig. 1).


Monitoring functional capability of individuals with lower limb amputations using mobile phones.

Albert MV, McCarthy C, Valentin J, Herrmann M, Kording K, Jayaraman A - PLoS ONE (2013)

Data acquisition setup.A) The G1 android mobile phone used in this experiment. B) The axes of the tri-axial accelerometer relative to the image in A–xyz as red, green, blue, respectively. C) The phone was placed on the back of the subject so that the three axes pointed up, left, and to the back of the subject, as indicated in D.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3672103&req=5

pone-0065340-g001: Data acquisition setup.A) The G1 android mobile phone used in this experiment. B) The axes of the tri-axial accelerometer relative to the image in A–xyz as red, green, blue, respectively. C) The phone was placed on the back of the subject so that the three axes pointed up, left, and to the back of the subject, as indicated in D.
Mentions: The phones were T-mobile G1 phones running Android OS version 1.6. The sampling rate was variable between 15 and 25 Hz, with the higher sampling rate occurring at times of changing acceleration [17]. The phone was positioned such that the accelerometer axes aligned with ‘x’ as vertical (up), ‘y’ as medio-lateral (left), and ‘z’ as antero-posterior (behind) (fig. 1).

Bottom Line: To be effective, a prescribed prosthetic device must match the functional requirements and capabilities of each patient.Here, we quantify participant activity using mobile phones and relate activity measured during real world activity to the assigned K-levels.We observe a correlation between K-level and the proportion of moderate to high activity over the course of a week.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sensory Motor Performance Program, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA. markvalbert@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
To be effective, a prescribed prosthetic device must match the functional requirements and capabilities of each patient. These capabilities are usually assessed by a clinician and reported by the Medicare K-level designation of mobility. However, it is not clear how the K-level designation objectively relates to the use of prostheses outside of a clinical environment. Here, we quantify participant activity using mobile phones and relate activity measured during real world activity to the assigned K-levels. We observe a correlation between K-level and the proportion of moderate to high activity over the course of a week. This relationship suggests that accelerometry-based technologies such as mobile phones can be used to evaluate real world activity for mobility assessment. Quantifying everyday activity promises to improve assessment of real world prosthesis use, leading to a better matching of prostheses to individuals and enabling better evaluations of future prosthetic devices.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus