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Effects of 3 months of short sessions of controlled whole body vibrations on the risk of falls among nursing home residents.

Beaudart C, Maquet D, Mannarino M, Buckinx F, Demonceau M, Crielaard JM, Reginster JY, Bruyère O - BMC Geriatr (2013)

Bottom Line: No significant change in the studied parameters was observed between the treated (n=31) and the control group (n=31) after 3 months of training by controlled whole-body-vibrations.For the quantitative evaluation of the walk, no significant change was observed between the treated and the control group in single task as well as in dual task conditions.Further investigations, in which, for example, the exposure parameters would be changed, seem necessary. NCT01759680.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Public Health, Epidemiology and Health Economics, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium. c.beaudart@ulg.ac.be

ABSTRACT

Background: Fatigue, lack of motivation and low compliance can be observed in nursing home residents during the practice of physical activity. Because exercises should not be too vigorous, whole body vibration could potentially be an effective alternative. The objective of this randomized controlled trial was to assess the impact of 3-month training by whole body vibration on the risk of falls among nursing home residents.

Methods: Patients were randomized into two groups: the whole body vibration group which received 3 training sessions every week composed of 5 series of only 15 seconds of vibrations at 30 Hz frequency and a control group with normal daily life for the whole study period. The impact of this training on the risk of falls was assessed blindly by three tests: the Tinetti Test, the Timed Up and Go test and a quantitative evaluation of a 10-second walk performed with a tri-axial accelerometer.

Results: 62 subjects (47 women and 15 men; mean age 83.2 ± 7.99 years) were recruited for the study. No significant change in the studied parameters was observed between the treated (n=31) and the control group (n=31) after 3 months of training by controlled whole-body-vibrations. Actually, the Tinetti test increased of + 0.93 ± 3.14 points in the treated group against + 0.88 ± 2.33 points in the control group (p = 0.89 when adjusted). The Timed Up and Go test showed a median evolution of - 1.14 (- 4.75-3.73) seconds in the treated group against + 0.41 (- 3.57- 2.41) seconds in the control group (p = 0.06). For the quantitative evaluation of the walk, no significant change was observed between the treated and the control group in single task as well as in dual task conditions.

Conclusions: The whole body vibration training performed with the exposition settings such as those used in this research was feasible but seems to have no impact on the risk of falls among nursing home residents. Further investigations, in which, for example, the exposure parameters would be changed, seem necessary.

Trial registration number: NCT01759680.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The Vibrosphere® device.
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Figure 1: The Vibrosphere® device.

Mentions: The WBV group performed exercises three times a week during three months on a sinusoidal vibration platform (Vibrosphere®, Figure 1). Exercises consisted of standing up, shoes removed, in a bipodal station with a knee flexion (as if skiing, no specified angle) on this vertical vibration platform for 5 series of 15 seconds of vibrations at 30 Hz intensity, 2mm of amplitude, alternating with 30 seconds of rest. As the vibration device has a spherical base, four different cushions with various density and thickness can be placed under the platform to decrease more or less the difficulty. Given the physical health of our population, we decided to place the cushion with the lowest density and the highest thickness (10 cm) to facilitate the training as much as possible. The device was placed in front of wall-bars to reassure patients in case of imbalance. Patients were asked not to hold onto these wall-bars during the training but could place their hand close to them.


Effects of 3 months of short sessions of controlled whole body vibrations on the risk of falls among nursing home residents.

Beaudart C, Maquet D, Mannarino M, Buckinx F, Demonceau M, Crielaard JM, Reginster JY, Bruyère O - BMC Geriatr (2013)

The Vibrosphere® device.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3649886&req=5

Figure 1: The Vibrosphere® device.
Mentions: The WBV group performed exercises three times a week during three months on a sinusoidal vibration platform (Vibrosphere®, Figure 1). Exercises consisted of standing up, shoes removed, in a bipodal station with a knee flexion (as if skiing, no specified angle) on this vertical vibration platform for 5 series of 15 seconds of vibrations at 30 Hz intensity, 2mm of amplitude, alternating with 30 seconds of rest. As the vibration device has a spherical base, four different cushions with various density and thickness can be placed under the platform to decrease more or less the difficulty. Given the physical health of our population, we decided to place the cushion with the lowest density and the highest thickness (10 cm) to facilitate the training as much as possible. The device was placed in front of wall-bars to reassure patients in case of imbalance. Patients were asked not to hold onto these wall-bars during the training but could place their hand close to them.

Bottom Line: No significant change in the studied parameters was observed between the treated (n=31) and the control group (n=31) after 3 months of training by controlled whole-body-vibrations.For the quantitative evaluation of the walk, no significant change was observed between the treated and the control group in single task as well as in dual task conditions.Further investigations, in which, for example, the exposure parameters would be changed, seem necessary. NCT01759680.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Public Health, Epidemiology and Health Economics, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium. c.beaudart@ulg.ac.be

ABSTRACT

Background: Fatigue, lack of motivation and low compliance can be observed in nursing home residents during the practice of physical activity. Because exercises should not be too vigorous, whole body vibration could potentially be an effective alternative. The objective of this randomized controlled trial was to assess the impact of 3-month training by whole body vibration on the risk of falls among nursing home residents.

Methods: Patients were randomized into two groups: the whole body vibration group which received 3 training sessions every week composed of 5 series of only 15 seconds of vibrations at 30 Hz frequency and a control group with normal daily life for the whole study period. The impact of this training on the risk of falls was assessed blindly by three tests: the Tinetti Test, the Timed Up and Go test and a quantitative evaluation of a 10-second walk performed with a tri-axial accelerometer.

Results: 62 subjects (47 women and 15 men; mean age 83.2 ± 7.99 years) were recruited for the study. No significant change in the studied parameters was observed between the treated (n=31) and the control group (n=31) after 3 months of training by controlled whole-body-vibrations. Actually, the Tinetti test increased of + 0.93 ± 3.14 points in the treated group against + 0.88 ± 2.33 points in the control group (p = 0.89 when adjusted). The Timed Up and Go test showed a median evolution of - 1.14 (- 4.75-3.73) seconds in the treated group against + 0.41 (- 3.57- 2.41) seconds in the control group (p = 0.06). For the quantitative evaluation of the walk, no significant change was observed between the treated and the control group in single task as well as in dual task conditions.

Conclusions: The whole body vibration training performed with the exposition settings such as those used in this research was feasible but seems to have no impact on the risk of falls among nursing home residents. Further investigations, in which, for example, the exposure parameters would be changed, seem necessary.

Trial registration number: NCT01759680.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus