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Increased cell fusion in cerebral cortex may contribute to poststroke regeneration.

Paltsyn A, Komissarova S, Dubrovin I, Kubatiev A - Stroke Res Treat (2013)

Bottom Line: The appearance of additional neuronal nuclei increases the functional outcome of the population of neurons.Participation of a certain number of binuclear cells in neuronal function might compensate for a functional deficit that arises from the death of a subset of neurons.In this case, the rate of recovery of stroke-damaged locomotor behavior also increased, which indicates the regenerative role of fusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of General Pathology and Pathophysiology of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Baltiskaya Street 8, Moscow 125315, Russia ; Russian Medical Academy of Postgraduate Education, Moscow, Russia.

ABSTRACT
In this study, we used a model of a hemorrhagic stroke in a motor zone of the cortex in rats at the age of 3 months The report shows that cortical neurons can fuse with oligodendrocytes. In formed binuclear cells, the nucleus of an oligodendrocyte undergoes neuron specific reprogramming. It can be confirmed by changes in chromatin structure and in size of the second nucleus, by expression of specific neuronal markers and increasing total transcription rate. The nucleus of an oligodendrocyte likely transforms into a second neuronal nucleus. The number of binuclear neurons was validated with quantitative analysis. Fusion of neurons with oligodendrocytes might be a regenerative process in general and specifically following a stroke. The appearance of additional neuronal nuclei increases the functional outcome of the population of neurons. Participation of a certain number of binuclear cells in neuronal function might compensate for a functional deficit that arises from the death of a subset of neurons. After a stroke, the number of binuclear neurons increased in cortex around the lesion zone. In this case, the rate of recovery of stroke-damaged locomotor behavior also increased, which indicates the regenerative role of fusion.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Location of lesion and perilesional zones of hemorrhagic stroke (S1FL field of cortex)—1: transplant (crumbled out), 2: infiltrate, 3: penumbra, 4: boundary zone. Rectangular areas of cortex from which tissue was taken for analysis—a: in the boundary zone; b: in the adjacent cortex. The scale bar is 300 μm.
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fig1: Location of lesion and perilesional zones of hemorrhagic stroke (S1FL field of cortex)—1: transplant (crumbled out), 2: infiltrate, 3: penumbra, 4: boundary zone. Rectangular areas of cortex from which tissue was taken for analysis—a: in the boundary zone; b: in the adjacent cortex. The scale bar is 300 μm.

Mentions: The histological treatment removed most of the transplant (sometimes together with a part of the infiltrate). The empty space of the former transplant was surrounded by an infiltrate zone. It contained only cells of the infiltrate and vessels; neurons were absent. More peripheral penumbra was observed. Here we found edema and cells of infiltrate and neurons, among which alive and dead cells were observed according to their morphology. A layer of cortex located outside the penumbra is the boundary zone. Here, it was possible to find only vascular changes compared with surrounding normal-morphology cortex. Figure 1 shows a part of the cortex that had insult zones (Figure 1).


Increased cell fusion in cerebral cortex may contribute to poststroke regeneration.

Paltsyn A, Komissarova S, Dubrovin I, Kubatiev A - Stroke Res Treat (2013)

Location of lesion and perilesional zones of hemorrhagic stroke (S1FL field of cortex)—1: transplant (crumbled out), 2: infiltrate, 3: penumbra, 4: boundary zone. Rectangular areas of cortex from which tissue was taken for analysis—a: in the boundary zone; b: in the adjacent cortex. The scale bar is 300 μm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3649807&req=5

fig1: Location of lesion and perilesional zones of hemorrhagic stroke (S1FL field of cortex)—1: transplant (crumbled out), 2: infiltrate, 3: penumbra, 4: boundary zone. Rectangular areas of cortex from which tissue was taken for analysis—a: in the boundary zone; b: in the adjacent cortex. The scale bar is 300 μm.
Mentions: The histological treatment removed most of the transplant (sometimes together with a part of the infiltrate). The empty space of the former transplant was surrounded by an infiltrate zone. It contained only cells of the infiltrate and vessels; neurons were absent. More peripheral penumbra was observed. Here we found edema and cells of infiltrate and neurons, among which alive and dead cells were observed according to their morphology. A layer of cortex located outside the penumbra is the boundary zone. Here, it was possible to find only vascular changes compared with surrounding normal-morphology cortex. Figure 1 shows a part of the cortex that had insult zones (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: The appearance of additional neuronal nuclei increases the functional outcome of the population of neurons.Participation of a certain number of binuclear cells in neuronal function might compensate for a functional deficit that arises from the death of a subset of neurons.In this case, the rate of recovery of stroke-damaged locomotor behavior also increased, which indicates the regenerative role of fusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of General Pathology and Pathophysiology of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Baltiskaya Street 8, Moscow 125315, Russia ; Russian Medical Academy of Postgraduate Education, Moscow, Russia.

ABSTRACT
In this study, we used a model of a hemorrhagic stroke in a motor zone of the cortex in rats at the age of 3 months The report shows that cortical neurons can fuse with oligodendrocytes. In formed binuclear cells, the nucleus of an oligodendrocyte undergoes neuron specific reprogramming. It can be confirmed by changes in chromatin structure and in size of the second nucleus, by expression of specific neuronal markers and increasing total transcription rate. The nucleus of an oligodendrocyte likely transforms into a second neuronal nucleus. The number of binuclear neurons was validated with quantitative analysis. Fusion of neurons with oligodendrocytes might be a regenerative process in general and specifically following a stroke. The appearance of additional neuronal nuclei increases the functional outcome of the population of neurons. Participation of a certain number of binuclear cells in neuronal function might compensate for a functional deficit that arises from the death of a subset of neurons. After a stroke, the number of binuclear neurons increased in cortex around the lesion zone. In this case, the rate of recovery of stroke-damaged locomotor behavior also increased, which indicates the regenerative role of fusion.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus