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Spinal cord injury and pressure ulcer prevention: using functional activity in pressure relief.

Stinson M, Schofield R, Gillan C, Morton J, Gardner E, Sprigle S, Porter-Armstrong A - Nurs Res Pract (2013)

Bottom Line: The majority of movements yielded less than 25% reduction in interface pressure compared to normal sitting.Reaching forward by 150% of arm length during an adapted computer activity significantly reduced DI (P < 0.05), angle of trunk tilt (p<0.05), and PPI for both ischial tuberosity regions (P < 0.001) compared to normal sitting.Reaching forward significantly redistributed pressure at the seating interface, as evidenced by the change in interface pressures compared to upright sitting.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Health Sciences, Centre for Health and Rehabilitation Technologies, University of Ulster, Jordanstown BT37 0QB, Ireland ; Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Research Centre, University of Ulster, Jordanstown BT37 0QB, Ireland.

ABSTRACT
Background. People with spinal cord injury (SCI) are at increased risk of pressure ulcers due to prolonged periods of sitting. Concordance with pressure relieving movements is poor amongst this population, and one potential alternative to improve this would be to integrate pressure relieving movements into everyday functional activities. Objectives. To investigate both the current pressure relieving behaviours of SCI individuals during computer use and the application of an ergonomically adapted computer-based activity to reduce interface pressure. Design. Observational and repeated measures design. Setting. Regional Spinal Cord Injury Unit. Participants. Fourteen subjects diagnosed with SCI (12 male, 2 female). Intervention.Comparing normal sitting to seated movements and induced forward reaching positions. Main Outcome Measures. Interface pressure measurements: dispersion index (DI), peak pressure index (PPI), and total contact area (CA). The angle of trunk tilt was also measured. Results. The majority of movements yielded less than 25% reduction in interface pressure compared to normal sitting. Reaching forward by 150% of arm length during an adapted computer activity significantly reduced DI (P < 0.05), angle of trunk tilt (p<0.05), and PPI for both ischial tuberosity regions (P < 0.001) compared to normal sitting. Conclusion. Reaching forward significantly redistributed pressure at the seating interface, as evidenced by the change in interface pressures compared to upright sitting.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effectiveness of repositioning movements performed during Strand A on seating interface pressures.
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fig2: Effectiveness of repositioning movements performed during Strand A on seating interface pressures.

Mentions: No movement performed over the 1 hour period was categorised as relieving 75–100% of interface pressures around the vulnerable ischial area, despite five of the participants performing “push-up” pressure reliefs during this time. The majority of all movements performed (84.4%) were categorised as yielding less than 25% reduction in interface pressures when compared to normal sitting. Thus, the effectiveness of the majority of weight shifts performed in terms of pressure relief was low (Figure 2).


Spinal cord injury and pressure ulcer prevention: using functional activity in pressure relief.

Stinson M, Schofield R, Gillan C, Morton J, Gardner E, Sprigle S, Porter-Armstrong A - Nurs Res Pract (2013)

Effectiveness of repositioning movements performed during Strand A on seating interface pressures.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3649706&req=5

fig2: Effectiveness of repositioning movements performed during Strand A on seating interface pressures.
Mentions: No movement performed over the 1 hour period was categorised as relieving 75–100% of interface pressures around the vulnerable ischial area, despite five of the participants performing “push-up” pressure reliefs during this time. The majority of all movements performed (84.4%) were categorised as yielding less than 25% reduction in interface pressures when compared to normal sitting. Thus, the effectiveness of the majority of weight shifts performed in terms of pressure relief was low (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: The majority of movements yielded less than 25% reduction in interface pressure compared to normal sitting.Reaching forward by 150% of arm length during an adapted computer activity significantly reduced DI (P < 0.05), angle of trunk tilt (p<0.05), and PPI for both ischial tuberosity regions (P < 0.001) compared to normal sitting.Reaching forward significantly redistributed pressure at the seating interface, as evidenced by the change in interface pressures compared to upright sitting.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Health Sciences, Centre for Health and Rehabilitation Technologies, University of Ulster, Jordanstown BT37 0QB, Ireland ; Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Research Centre, University of Ulster, Jordanstown BT37 0QB, Ireland.

ABSTRACT
Background. People with spinal cord injury (SCI) are at increased risk of pressure ulcers due to prolonged periods of sitting. Concordance with pressure relieving movements is poor amongst this population, and one potential alternative to improve this would be to integrate pressure relieving movements into everyday functional activities. Objectives. To investigate both the current pressure relieving behaviours of SCI individuals during computer use and the application of an ergonomically adapted computer-based activity to reduce interface pressure. Design. Observational and repeated measures design. Setting. Regional Spinal Cord Injury Unit. Participants. Fourteen subjects diagnosed with SCI (12 male, 2 female). Intervention.Comparing normal sitting to seated movements and induced forward reaching positions. Main Outcome Measures. Interface pressure measurements: dispersion index (DI), peak pressure index (PPI), and total contact area (CA). The angle of trunk tilt was also measured. Results. The majority of movements yielded less than 25% reduction in interface pressure compared to normal sitting. Reaching forward by 150% of arm length during an adapted computer activity significantly reduced DI (P < 0.05), angle of trunk tilt (p<0.05), and PPI for both ischial tuberosity regions (P < 0.001) compared to normal sitting. Conclusion. Reaching forward significantly redistributed pressure at the seating interface, as evidenced by the change in interface pressures compared to upright sitting.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus