Limits...
Psychiatric morbidity and other factors affecting treatment adherence in pulmonary tuberculosis patients.

Pachi A, Bratis D, Moussas G, Tselebis A - Tuberc Res Treat (2013)

Bottom Line: As the overall prevalence of TB remains high among certain population groups, there is growing awareness of psychiatric comorbidity, especially depression and its role in the outcome of the disease.Studies reporting high prevalence rates of psychiatric comorbidity, especially depression, as well as specific psychological reactions and disease perceptions and reviews indicating psychiatric complications as adverse effects of anti-TB medication were included.In sum, data concerning factors affecting medication nonadherence among TB patients suggested that better management of comorbid conditions, especially depression, could improve the adherence rates, serving as a framework for the effective control of tuberculosis, but further studies are necessary to identify the optimal way to address such issues among these patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Psychiatric Department, Sotiria General Hospital of Chest Disease, Athens, Greece.

ABSTRACT
As the overall prevalence of TB remains high among certain population groups, there is growing awareness of psychiatric comorbidity, especially depression and its role in the outcome of the disease. The paper attempts a holistic approach to the effects of psychiatric comorbidity to the natural history of tuberculosis. In order to investigate factors associated with medication nonadherence among patients suffering from tuberculosis, with emphasis on psychopathology as a major barrier to treatment adherence, we performed a systematic review of the literature on epidemiological data and past medical reviews from an historical perspective, followed by theoretical considerations upon the relationship between psychiatric disorders and tuberculosis. Studies reporting high prevalence rates of psychiatric comorbidity, especially depression, as well as specific psychological reactions and disease perceptions and reviews indicating psychiatric complications as adverse effects of anti-TB medication were included. In sum, data concerning factors affecting medication nonadherence among TB patients suggested that better management of comorbid conditions, especially depression, could improve the adherence rates, serving as a framework for the effective control of tuberculosis, but further studies are necessary to identify the optimal way to address such issues among these patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Consort diagram of the method.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3649695&req=5

fig1: Consort diagram of the method.

Mentions: Using the terms “tuberculosis and mental illness,” “anxiety and depression in tuberculosis,” “risk factors for nonadherence to tuberculosis treatment,” and “psychiatric and antitubercular drugs,” we searched Medline and using the terms “mental illness stigma and tuberculosis,” “mental illness primary care and tuberculosis,” and “tuberculosis non-adherence and psychosocial factors,” we searched PubMed. Articles were restricted to English, and publication dates were from 1950 to 2012. This yielded 355 articles. However, after excluding 38 articles that focused on TB without attention to mental health, 24 articles on mental health outside the context of TB and another 121 irrelevant and 73 extra specialized articles outside our primary focus, 94 articles were found, but 82 were kept for review, after excluding common articles. Then, 34 articles with publication dates older than 5 years were sent to Scholar Google in order to check their citation indexes. With this method, we located 53 additional articles with publication dates during the last 5 years. We reviewed the reference section of all (135) retrieved articles in order to locate additional publications not found in our initial search (Consort diagram—Figure 1).


Psychiatric morbidity and other factors affecting treatment adherence in pulmonary tuberculosis patients.

Pachi A, Bratis D, Moussas G, Tselebis A - Tuberc Res Treat (2013)

Consort diagram of the method.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3649695&req=5

fig1: Consort diagram of the method.
Mentions: Using the terms “tuberculosis and mental illness,” “anxiety and depression in tuberculosis,” “risk factors for nonadherence to tuberculosis treatment,” and “psychiatric and antitubercular drugs,” we searched Medline and using the terms “mental illness stigma and tuberculosis,” “mental illness primary care and tuberculosis,” and “tuberculosis non-adherence and psychosocial factors,” we searched PubMed. Articles were restricted to English, and publication dates were from 1950 to 2012. This yielded 355 articles. However, after excluding 38 articles that focused on TB without attention to mental health, 24 articles on mental health outside the context of TB and another 121 irrelevant and 73 extra specialized articles outside our primary focus, 94 articles were found, but 82 were kept for review, after excluding common articles. Then, 34 articles with publication dates older than 5 years were sent to Scholar Google in order to check their citation indexes. With this method, we located 53 additional articles with publication dates during the last 5 years. We reviewed the reference section of all (135) retrieved articles in order to locate additional publications not found in our initial search (Consort diagram—Figure 1).

Bottom Line: As the overall prevalence of TB remains high among certain population groups, there is growing awareness of psychiatric comorbidity, especially depression and its role in the outcome of the disease.Studies reporting high prevalence rates of psychiatric comorbidity, especially depression, as well as specific psychological reactions and disease perceptions and reviews indicating psychiatric complications as adverse effects of anti-TB medication were included.In sum, data concerning factors affecting medication nonadherence among TB patients suggested that better management of comorbid conditions, especially depression, could improve the adherence rates, serving as a framework for the effective control of tuberculosis, but further studies are necessary to identify the optimal way to address such issues among these patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Psychiatric Department, Sotiria General Hospital of Chest Disease, Athens, Greece.

ABSTRACT
As the overall prevalence of TB remains high among certain population groups, there is growing awareness of psychiatric comorbidity, especially depression and its role in the outcome of the disease. The paper attempts a holistic approach to the effects of psychiatric comorbidity to the natural history of tuberculosis. In order to investigate factors associated with medication nonadherence among patients suffering from tuberculosis, with emphasis on psychopathology as a major barrier to treatment adherence, we performed a systematic review of the literature on epidemiological data and past medical reviews from an historical perspective, followed by theoretical considerations upon the relationship between psychiatric disorders and tuberculosis. Studies reporting high prevalence rates of psychiatric comorbidity, especially depression, as well as specific psychological reactions and disease perceptions and reviews indicating psychiatric complications as adverse effects of anti-TB medication were included. In sum, data concerning factors affecting medication nonadherence among TB patients suggested that better management of comorbid conditions, especially depression, could improve the adherence rates, serving as a framework for the effective control of tuberculosis, but further studies are necessary to identify the optimal way to address such issues among these patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus