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Comparison Study of Airway Reactivity Outcomes due to a Pharmacologic Challenge Test: Impulse Oscillometry versus Least Mean Squared Analysis Techniques.

Rodriguez E, Bullard CM, Armani MH, Miller TL, Shaffer TH - Pulm Med (2013)

Bottom Line: The technique of measuring transpulmonary pressure and respiratory airflow with manometry and pneumotachography using the least mean squared analysis (LMS) has been used broadly in both preclinical and clinical settings for the evaluation of neonatal respiratory function during tidal volume breathing for lung tissue and airway frictional mechanical properties measurements.Whereas the technique of measuring respiratory function using the impulse oscillation technique (IOS) involves the assessment of the relationship between pressure and flow using an impulse signal with a range of frequencies, requires less cooperation and provides more information on total respiratory system resistance (chest wall, lung tissue, and airways).The present study represents a preclinical animal study to determine whether these respiratory function techniques (LMS and IOS) are comparable in detecting changes in respiratory resistance derived from a direct pharmacological challenge.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nemours Research Lung Center, Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE 19803, USA ; Nemours Biomedical Research, Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE 19803, USA ; Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA.

ABSTRACT
The technique of measuring transpulmonary pressure and respiratory airflow with manometry and pneumotachography using the least mean squared analysis (LMS) has been used broadly in both preclinical and clinical settings for the evaluation of neonatal respiratory function during tidal volume breathing for lung tissue and airway frictional mechanical properties measurements. Whereas the technique of measuring respiratory function using the impulse oscillation technique (IOS) involves the assessment of the relationship between pressure and flow using an impulse signal with a range of frequencies, requires less cooperation and provides more information on total respiratory system resistance (chest wall, lung tissue, and airways). The present study represents a preclinical animal study to determine whether these respiratory function techniques (LMS and IOS) are comparable in detecting changes in respiratory resistance derived from a direct pharmacological challenge.

No MeSH data available.


Plots of mean values for dynamic pulmonary resistance (resistance) before (pre) and after (post) bethanechol for each piglet. P = 0.003, paired t-test one tailed.
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fig2: Plots of mean values for dynamic pulmonary resistance (resistance) before (pre) and after (post) bethanechol for each piglet. P = 0.003, paired t-test one tailed.

Mentions: Respiratory mechanics measurements showed a significant increase in dynamic pulmonary resistance measured by the LMS (+53%, P = 0.003) following bethanechol administration (Figure 2). Pressure-volume loops also verified that, when compared with baseline, bethanechol administration resulted in increased pressure requirements as well as a widening and decrease in the slope of the pressure-volume loops.


Comparison Study of Airway Reactivity Outcomes due to a Pharmacologic Challenge Test: Impulse Oscillometry versus Least Mean Squared Analysis Techniques.

Rodriguez E, Bullard CM, Armani MH, Miller TL, Shaffer TH - Pulm Med (2013)

Plots of mean values for dynamic pulmonary resistance (resistance) before (pre) and after (post) bethanechol for each piglet. P = 0.003, paired t-test one tailed.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3649693&req=5

fig2: Plots of mean values for dynamic pulmonary resistance (resistance) before (pre) and after (post) bethanechol for each piglet. P = 0.003, paired t-test one tailed.
Mentions: Respiratory mechanics measurements showed a significant increase in dynamic pulmonary resistance measured by the LMS (+53%, P = 0.003) following bethanechol administration (Figure 2). Pressure-volume loops also verified that, when compared with baseline, bethanechol administration resulted in increased pressure requirements as well as a widening and decrease in the slope of the pressure-volume loops.

Bottom Line: The technique of measuring transpulmonary pressure and respiratory airflow with manometry and pneumotachography using the least mean squared analysis (LMS) has been used broadly in both preclinical and clinical settings for the evaluation of neonatal respiratory function during tidal volume breathing for lung tissue and airway frictional mechanical properties measurements.Whereas the technique of measuring respiratory function using the impulse oscillation technique (IOS) involves the assessment of the relationship between pressure and flow using an impulse signal with a range of frequencies, requires less cooperation and provides more information on total respiratory system resistance (chest wall, lung tissue, and airways).The present study represents a preclinical animal study to determine whether these respiratory function techniques (LMS and IOS) are comparable in detecting changes in respiratory resistance derived from a direct pharmacological challenge.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nemours Research Lung Center, Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE 19803, USA ; Nemours Biomedical Research, Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE 19803, USA ; Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA.

ABSTRACT
The technique of measuring transpulmonary pressure and respiratory airflow with manometry and pneumotachography using the least mean squared analysis (LMS) has been used broadly in both preclinical and clinical settings for the evaluation of neonatal respiratory function during tidal volume breathing for lung tissue and airway frictional mechanical properties measurements. Whereas the technique of measuring respiratory function using the impulse oscillation technique (IOS) involves the assessment of the relationship between pressure and flow using an impulse signal with a range of frequencies, requires less cooperation and provides more information on total respiratory system resistance (chest wall, lung tissue, and airways). The present study represents a preclinical animal study to determine whether these respiratory function techniques (LMS and IOS) are comparable in detecting changes in respiratory resistance derived from a direct pharmacological challenge.

No MeSH data available.