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Adenosine monophosphate forms ordered arrays in multilamellar lipid matrices: insights into assembly of nucleic acid for primitive life.

Toppozini L, Dies H, Deamer DW, Rheinstädter MC - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: Bragg peaks corresponding to the lateral organization of the confined AMP molecules were observed.Instead of forming a random array, the AMP molecules are highly entangled, with the phosphate and ribose groups in close proximity.This structure may facilitate polymerization of the nucleotides into RNA-like polymers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. toppozl@mcmaster.ca

ABSTRACT
A fundamental question of biology is how nucleic acids first assembled and then were incorporated into the earliest forms of cellular life 4 billion years ago. The polymerization of nucleotides is a condensation reaction in which phosphodiester bonds are formed. This reaction cannot occur in aqueous solutions, but guided polymerization in an anhydrous lipid environment could promote a non-enzymatic condensation reaction in which oligomers of single stranded nucleic acids are synthesized. We used X-ray scattering to investigate 5'-adenosine monophosphate (AMP) molecules captured in a multilamellar phospholipid matrix composed of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine. Bragg peaks corresponding to the lateral organization of the confined AMP molecules were observed. Instead of forming a random array, the AMP molecules are highly entangled, with the phosphate and ribose groups in close proximity. This structure may facilitate polymerization of the nucleotides into RNA-like polymers.

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Schematic showing the experimental setup.A Lipids and AMP form a highly oriented multilamellar structure with the AMP molecules confined between the bilayers. B Diffraction of X-rays from the highly oriented solid supported lipid/AMP complexes. qz and q// are the out-of-plane and in-plane components of the scattering vector, Q. Chemical structures and representations of C dimyristoylphosphocholine (DMPC) and D adenosine monophosphate (AMP) molecules are depicted.
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pone-0062810-g001: Schematic showing the experimental setup.A Lipids and AMP form a highly oriented multilamellar structure with the AMP molecules confined between the bilayers. B Diffraction of X-rays from the highly oriented solid supported lipid/AMP complexes. qz and q// are the out-of-plane and in-plane components of the scattering vector, Q. Chemical structures and representations of C dimyristoylphosphocholine (DMPC) and D adenosine monophosphate (AMP) molecules are depicted.

Mentions: To test whether such organization occurs, we used X-ray scattering to investigate 5′-adenosine monophosphate (AMP) molecules captured in a multilamellar phospholipid matrix composed of 1,2-Dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC), as shown in Figure 1. We chose AMP for this study because it was used in the earlier report that demonstrated its polymerization in a lipid matrix. Guanosine monophosphate (GMP) was not investigated because of its well known tendency to form relatively insoluble aggregates. The in-plane and out-of-plane structure of the bilayer/AMP complexes was determined with sub-nanometer resolution from these measurements, and Bragg peaks corresponding to the lateral organization of the confined AMP molecules were observed. Instead of forming a random array, or a geometrically favorable herringbone or chevron structure, the AMP molecules are highly entangled, with the phosphate and ribose groups in close proximity. This structure may facilitate polymerization of the nucleotides into RNA-like polymers.


Adenosine monophosphate forms ordered arrays in multilamellar lipid matrices: insights into assembly of nucleic acid for primitive life.

Toppozini L, Dies H, Deamer DW, Rheinstädter MC - PLoS ONE (2013)

Schematic showing the experimental setup.A Lipids and AMP form a highly oriented multilamellar structure with the AMP molecules confined between the bilayers. B Diffraction of X-rays from the highly oriented solid supported lipid/AMP complexes. qz and q// are the out-of-plane and in-plane components of the scattering vector, Q. Chemical structures and representations of C dimyristoylphosphocholine (DMPC) and D adenosine monophosphate (AMP) molecules are depicted.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3646914&req=5

pone-0062810-g001: Schematic showing the experimental setup.A Lipids and AMP form a highly oriented multilamellar structure with the AMP molecules confined between the bilayers. B Diffraction of X-rays from the highly oriented solid supported lipid/AMP complexes. qz and q// are the out-of-plane and in-plane components of the scattering vector, Q. Chemical structures and representations of C dimyristoylphosphocholine (DMPC) and D adenosine monophosphate (AMP) molecules are depicted.
Mentions: To test whether such organization occurs, we used X-ray scattering to investigate 5′-adenosine monophosphate (AMP) molecules captured in a multilamellar phospholipid matrix composed of 1,2-Dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC), as shown in Figure 1. We chose AMP for this study because it was used in the earlier report that demonstrated its polymerization in a lipid matrix. Guanosine monophosphate (GMP) was not investigated because of its well known tendency to form relatively insoluble aggregates. The in-plane and out-of-plane structure of the bilayer/AMP complexes was determined with sub-nanometer resolution from these measurements, and Bragg peaks corresponding to the lateral organization of the confined AMP molecules were observed. Instead of forming a random array, or a geometrically favorable herringbone or chevron structure, the AMP molecules are highly entangled, with the phosphate and ribose groups in close proximity. This structure may facilitate polymerization of the nucleotides into RNA-like polymers.

Bottom Line: Bragg peaks corresponding to the lateral organization of the confined AMP molecules were observed.Instead of forming a random array, the AMP molecules are highly entangled, with the phosphate and ribose groups in close proximity.This structure may facilitate polymerization of the nucleotides into RNA-like polymers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. toppozl@mcmaster.ca

ABSTRACT
A fundamental question of biology is how nucleic acids first assembled and then were incorporated into the earliest forms of cellular life 4 billion years ago. The polymerization of nucleotides is a condensation reaction in which phosphodiester bonds are formed. This reaction cannot occur in aqueous solutions, but guided polymerization in an anhydrous lipid environment could promote a non-enzymatic condensation reaction in which oligomers of single stranded nucleic acids are synthesized. We used X-ray scattering to investigate 5'-adenosine monophosphate (AMP) molecules captured in a multilamellar phospholipid matrix composed of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine. Bragg peaks corresponding to the lateral organization of the confined AMP molecules were observed. Instead of forming a random array, the AMP molecules are highly entangled, with the phosphate and ribose groups in close proximity. This structure may facilitate polymerization of the nucleotides into RNA-like polymers.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus