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Microcavity controlled coupling of excitonic qubits.

Albert F, Sivalertporn K, Kasprzak J, Strauß M, Schneider C, Höfling S, Kamp M, Forchel A, Reitzenstein S, Muljarov EA, Langbein W - Nat Commun (2013)

Bottom Line: This is enabled by two-dimensional spectroscopy of the sample's coherent response, a sensitive probe of the coherent coupling.The results are quantitatively understood in a rigorous description of the cavity-mediated coupling of the quantum dot excitons.This mechanism can be used, for instance in photonic crystal cavity networks, to enable a long-range, non-local coherent coupling.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Technische Physik, Physikalisches Institut, and Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen Research Center for Complex Material Systems, Universität Würzburg, Am Hubland, Würzburg D-97074, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Controlled non-local energy and coherence transfer enables light harvesting in photosynthesis and non-local logical operations in quantum computing. This process is intuitively pictured by a pair of mechanical oscillators, coupled by a spring, allowing for a reversible exchange of excitation. On a microscopic level, the most relevant mechanism of coherent coupling of distant quantum bits--like trapped ions, superconducting qubits or excitons confined in semiconductor quantum dots--is coupling via the electromagnetic field. Here we demonstrate the controlled coherent coupling of spatially separated quantum dots via the photon mode of a solid state microresonator using the strong exciton-photon coupling regime. This is enabled by two-dimensional spectroscopy of the sample's coherent response, a sensitive probe of the coherent coupling. The results are quantitatively understood in a rigorous description of the cavity-mediated coupling of the quantum dot excitons. This mechanism can be used, for instance in photonic crystal cavity networks, to enable a long-range, non-local coherent coupling.

No MeSH data available.


Cavity-mediated coherent coupling revealed by two-dimensional FWM.Two-dimensional FWM at T=19 K with  meV.  measured and phase corrected (a) and predicted with (b) and without (c) phase correction. The amplitude is given as height, while the phase is given as hue of the surface colour, as indicated. The white line shows the diagonal  on the surface. (d–f) As (a–c), but showing the post-selected . Different representations of the data are shown in Supplementary Figs S10 and S11.
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f4: Cavity-mediated coherent coupling revealed by two-dimensional FWM.Two-dimensional FWM at T=19 K with  meV. measured and phase corrected (a) and predicted with (b) and without (c) phase correction. The amplitude is given as height, while the phase is given as hue of the surface colour, as indicated. The white line shows the diagonal on the surface. (d–f) As (a–c), but showing the post-selected . Different representations of the data are shown in Supplementary Figs S10 and S11.

Mentions: The agreement between the measured FWM dynamics and independently predicted FWM in the framework of the cavity-mediated coupling model for different detunings is revealing the coherent coupling of the three excitons via the cavity mode in the studied microresonator. A definite display of the coherent coupling is afforded by the two-dimensional (2D) frequency domain representation of the FWM, in which coherent coupling is observed as off-diagonal signals16171819. We retrieve the 2D FWM15 by Fourier-transforming from the delay time τ into the conjugated frequency yielding . In this transformation we use only positive delays , such that represents the frequency of the first-order polarization created by E1. The resulting 2D FWM diagram is presented in Fig. 4a.


Microcavity controlled coupling of excitonic qubits.

Albert F, Sivalertporn K, Kasprzak J, Strauß M, Schneider C, Höfling S, Kamp M, Forchel A, Reitzenstein S, Muljarov EA, Langbein W - Nat Commun (2013)

Cavity-mediated coherent coupling revealed by two-dimensional FWM.Two-dimensional FWM at T=19 K with  meV.  measured and phase corrected (a) and predicted with (b) and without (c) phase correction. The amplitude is given as height, while the phase is given as hue of the surface colour, as indicated. The white line shows the diagonal  on the surface. (d–f) As (a–c), but showing the post-selected . Different representations of the data are shown in Supplementary Figs S10 and S11.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3644086&req=5

f4: Cavity-mediated coherent coupling revealed by two-dimensional FWM.Two-dimensional FWM at T=19 K with  meV. measured and phase corrected (a) and predicted with (b) and without (c) phase correction. The amplitude is given as height, while the phase is given as hue of the surface colour, as indicated. The white line shows the diagonal on the surface. (d–f) As (a–c), but showing the post-selected . Different representations of the data are shown in Supplementary Figs S10 and S11.
Mentions: The agreement between the measured FWM dynamics and independently predicted FWM in the framework of the cavity-mediated coupling model for different detunings is revealing the coherent coupling of the three excitons via the cavity mode in the studied microresonator. A definite display of the coherent coupling is afforded by the two-dimensional (2D) frequency domain representation of the FWM, in which coherent coupling is observed as off-diagonal signals16171819. We retrieve the 2D FWM15 by Fourier-transforming from the delay time τ into the conjugated frequency yielding . In this transformation we use only positive delays , such that represents the frequency of the first-order polarization created by E1. The resulting 2D FWM diagram is presented in Fig. 4a.

Bottom Line: This is enabled by two-dimensional spectroscopy of the sample's coherent response, a sensitive probe of the coherent coupling.The results are quantitatively understood in a rigorous description of the cavity-mediated coupling of the quantum dot excitons.This mechanism can be used, for instance in photonic crystal cavity networks, to enable a long-range, non-local coherent coupling.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Technische Physik, Physikalisches Institut, and Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen Research Center for Complex Material Systems, Universität Würzburg, Am Hubland, Würzburg D-97074, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Controlled non-local energy and coherence transfer enables light harvesting in photosynthesis and non-local logical operations in quantum computing. This process is intuitively pictured by a pair of mechanical oscillators, coupled by a spring, allowing for a reversible exchange of excitation. On a microscopic level, the most relevant mechanism of coherent coupling of distant quantum bits--like trapped ions, superconducting qubits or excitons confined in semiconductor quantum dots--is coupling via the electromagnetic field. Here we demonstrate the controlled coherent coupling of spatially separated quantum dots via the photon mode of a solid state microresonator using the strong exciton-photon coupling regime. This is enabled by two-dimensional spectroscopy of the sample's coherent response, a sensitive probe of the coherent coupling. The results are quantitatively understood in a rigorous description of the cavity-mediated coupling of the quantum dot excitons. This mechanism can be used, for instance in photonic crystal cavity networks, to enable a long-range, non-local coherent coupling.

No MeSH data available.