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Intrinsic electrical conductivity of nanostructured metal-organic polymer chains.

Hermosa C, Vicente Álvarez J, Azani MR, Gómez-García CJ, Fritz M, Soler JM, Gómez-Herrero J, Gómez-Navarro C, Zamora F - Nat Commun (2013)

Bottom Line: This magnitude is preserved for distances as large as 300 nm.We provide the first direct experimental evidence of the gapless electronic structure predicted for these compounds.Our results postulate metal-organic molecular wires as good metallic interconnectors in nanodevices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049, Spain.

ABSTRACT
One-dimensional conductive polymers are attractive materials because of their potential in flexible and transparent electronics. Despite years of research, on the macro- and nano-scale, structural disorder represents the major hurdle in achieving high conductivities. Here we report measurements of highly ordered metal-organic nanoribbons, whose intrinsic (defect-free) conductivity is found to be 10(4) S m(-1), three orders of magnitude higher than that of our macroscopic crystals. This magnitude is preserved for distances as large as 300 nm. Above this length, the presence of structural defects (~ 0.5%) gives rise to an inter-fibre-mediated charge transport similar to that of macroscopic crystals. We provide the first direct experimental evidence of the gapless electronic structure predicted for these compounds. Our results postulate metal-organic molecular wires as good metallic interconnectors in nanodevices.

No MeSH data available.


Electrical characterisation of MMX nanoribbons by conductive AFM.(a) Scheme of the electronic circuit used to measure the current flowing through the nanoribbons, a metallized AFM tip is used as a mobile electrode. (b) I/V curves obtained at different distances between electrodes (lengths) for the same nanoribbon. Here it can be clearly seen that the linear behaviour is maintained for every point. Resistance is calculated as the inverse of the slope of these graphs. (c) Resistance versus length, in a linear scale, for the same nanoribbons as data depicted in b. The inset displays a semi log plot of the same experimental data. Black dots represent experimental measurements and grey line is a fit to
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f2: Electrical characterisation of MMX nanoribbons by conductive AFM.(a) Scheme of the electronic circuit used to measure the current flowing through the nanoribbons, a metallized AFM tip is used as a mobile electrode. (b) I/V curves obtained at different distances between electrodes (lengths) for the same nanoribbon. Here it can be clearly seen that the linear behaviour is maintained for every point. Resistance is calculated as the inverse of the slope of these graphs. (c) Resistance versus length, in a linear scale, for the same nanoribbons as data depicted in b. The inset displays a semi log plot of the same experimental data. Black dots represent experimental measurements and grey line is a fit to

Mentions: Figure 1a provides a schematic representation of a single chain of [Pt2(dta)4I]n. The crystals were synthesized and characterized as described in Bellitto et al.23 The nanoribbons were prepared by sublimating these crystals under high vacuum conditions on SiO2(300 nm)/Si(100) substrates previously treated with oxygen plasma (details can be found in the Methods section and Supplementary Figs S1 and S2). AFM images of the resulting nanoribbons are shown in Fig. 1b–d. Subsequent to nanoribbon growth, a macroscopic electrode was deposited by thermal evaporation of gold using a convenient stencil mask. The final result is a long gold electrode edge that partially covers a number of nanoribbons. The electrical resistance of the nanostructure was probed by CAFM2526. Figure 2a shows a representative AFM image of a nanoribbon protruding from a gold electrode, and a scheme of the electrical circuit was used to characterize the ribbon. Figure 2c displays the electrical resistance R, as a function of the distance between electrodes L, obtained for a representative nanoribbon. The resistance displays an initial region where it barely depends on length followed by a rapid increase that can be fitted well to an exponential law. The current versus voltage (I/V) curves acquired for the nanoribbons and depicted in Fig. 2b show a linear dependence, and hence the resistance for each data point in Fig. 2c is independent of the bias voltage.


Intrinsic electrical conductivity of nanostructured metal-organic polymer chains.

Hermosa C, Vicente Álvarez J, Azani MR, Gómez-García CJ, Fritz M, Soler JM, Gómez-Herrero J, Gómez-Navarro C, Zamora F - Nat Commun (2013)

Electrical characterisation of MMX nanoribbons by conductive AFM.(a) Scheme of the electronic circuit used to measure the current flowing through the nanoribbons, a metallized AFM tip is used as a mobile electrode. (b) I/V curves obtained at different distances between electrodes (lengths) for the same nanoribbon. Here it can be clearly seen that the linear behaviour is maintained for every point. Resistance is calculated as the inverse of the slope of these graphs. (c) Resistance versus length, in a linear scale, for the same nanoribbons as data depicted in b. The inset displays a semi log plot of the same experimental data. Black dots represent experimental measurements and grey line is a fit to
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3644075&req=5

f2: Electrical characterisation of MMX nanoribbons by conductive AFM.(a) Scheme of the electronic circuit used to measure the current flowing through the nanoribbons, a metallized AFM tip is used as a mobile electrode. (b) I/V curves obtained at different distances between electrodes (lengths) for the same nanoribbon. Here it can be clearly seen that the linear behaviour is maintained for every point. Resistance is calculated as the inverse of the slope of these graphs. (c) Resistance versus length, in a linear scale, for the same nanoribbons as data depicted in b. The inset displays a semi log plot of the same experimental data. Black dots represent experimental measurements and grey line is a fit to
Mentions: Figure 1a provides a schematic representation of a single chain of [Pt2(dta)4I]n. The crystals were synthesized and characterized as described in Bellitto et al.23 The nanoribbons were prepared by sublimating these crystals under high vacuum conditions on SiO2(300 nm)/Si(100) substrates previously treated with oxygen plasma (details can be found in the Methods section and Supplementary Figs S1 and S2). AFM images of the resulting nanoribbons are shown in Fig. 1b–d. Subsequent to nanoribbon growth, a macroscopic electrode was deposited by thermal evaporation of gold using a convenient stencil mask. The final result is a long gold electrode edge that partially covers a number of nanoribbons. The electrical resistance of the nanostructure was probed by CAFM2526. Figure 2a shows a representative AFM image of a nanoribbon protruding from a gold electrode, and a scheme of the electrical circuit was used to characterize the ribbon. Figure 2c displays the electrical resistance R, as a function of the distance between electrodes L, obtained for a representative nanoribbon. The resistance displays an initial region where it barely depends on length followed by a rapid increase that can be fitted well to an exponential law. The current versus voltage (I/V) curves acquired for the nanoribbons and depicted in Fig. 2b show a linear dependence, and hence the resistance for each data point in Fig. 2c is independent of the bias voltage.

Bottom Line: This magnitude is preserved for distances as large as 300 nm.We provide the first direct experimental evidence of the gapless electronic structure predicted for these compounds.Our results postulate metal-organic molecular wires as good metallic interconnectors in nanodevices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049, Spain.

ABSTRACT
One-dimensional conductive polymers are attractive materials because of their potential in flexible and transparent electronics. Despite years of research, on the macro- and nano-scale, structural disorder represents the major hurdle in achieving high conductivities. Here we report measurements of highly ordered metal-organic nanoribbons, whose intrinsic (defect-free) conductivity is found to be 10(4) S m(-1), three orders of magnitude higher than that of our macroscopic crystals. This magnitude is preserved for distances as large as 300 nm. Above this length, the presence of structural defects (~ 0.5%) gives rise to an inter-fibre-mediated charge transport similar to that of macroscopic crystals. We provide the first direct experimental evidence of the gapless electronic structure predicted for these compounds. Our results postulate metal-organic molecular wires as good metallic interconnectors in nanodevices.

No MeSH data available.