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Coherent diffraction imaging of nanoscale strain evolution in a single crystal under high pressure.

Yang W, Huang X, Harder R, Clark JN, Robinson IK, Mao HK - Nat Commun (2013)

Bottom Line: Here we report the successful de-convolution of these effects with the recently developed mutual coherent function method to reveal the three-dimensional strain distribution inside a 400 nm gold single crystal during compression within a diamond-anvil cell.The three-dimensional morphology and evolution of the strain under pressures up to 6.4 GPa were obtained with better than 30 nm spatial resolution.In addition to providing a new approach for high-pressure nanotechnology and rheology studies, we draw fundamental conclusions about the origin of the anomalous compressibility of nanocrystals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: High Pressure Synergetic Consortium, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA. wyang@ciw.edu

ABSTRACT
The evolution of morphology and internal strain under high pressure fundamentally alters the physical property, structural stability, phase transition and deformation mechanism of materials. Until now, only averaged strain distributions have been studied. Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging is highly sensitive to the internal strain distribution of individual crystals but requires coherent illumination, which can be compromised by the complex high-pressure sample environment. Here we report the successful de-convolution of these effects with the recently developed mutual coherent function method to reveal the three-dimensional strain distribution inside a 400 nm gold single crystal during compression within a diamond-anvil cell. The three-dimensional morphology and evolution of the strain under pressures up to 6.4 GPa were obtained with better than 30 nm spatial resolution. In addition to providing a new approach for high-pressure nanotechnology and rheology studies, we draw fundamental conclusions about the origin of the anomalous compressibility of nanocrystals.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Overall schematic of the experimental setup.A large opening panoramic diamond-anvil cell is used to compress the studied crystal, positioned at the rotation centre of the diffractometer. An X-ray sensitive charge-coupled device is placed at 1 m away to collect far-field diffraction patterns. The insert scanning-electron microscopy (SEM) picture shows typical gold nanoparticles distributed on a silicon substrate. The zoomed-in figure of the DAC shows the sample environment.
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f1: Overall schematic of the experimental setup.A large opening panoramic diamond-anvil cell is used to compress the studied crystal, positioned at the rotation centre of the diffractometer. An X-ray sensitive charge-coupled device is placed at 1 m away to collect far-field diffraction patterns. The insert scanning-electron microscopy (SEM) picture shows typical gold nanoparticles distributed on a silicon substrate. The zoomed-in figure of the DAC shows the sample environment.

Mentions: The schematic of the experimental setup is shown in Fig. 1. 3D diffraction patterns from the same gold crystal in a DAC were collected at several pressure conditions up to 6.4 GPa (see Methods section). To reduce the systematic effects of wavefront distortion, typically 5–8 repeated scans were collected at each pressure point, under slightly different alignment conditions, and averaged together. The diffraction data were inverted using phase retrieval algorithms, which utilize sufficiently oversampled diffraction intensities to recover the unmeasured phases of diffraction signal. In the reconstruction process, known information is imposed as constraints. The usual constraints are modulus constraint, which requires that the calculated Fourier intensity agrees with the measured data, and support constraint, which assumes that the sample is finite and isolated from other scatters in real space. We used a reconstruction cycle with an algorithm sequence of 10 error reduction, 150 hybrid-input-output and 40 error reduction. The ‘shrink-wrap’ strategy was used to refine the crystal shape used as a support21.


Coherent diffraction imaging of nanoscale strain evolution in a single crystal under high pressure.

Yang W, Huang X, Harder R, Clark JN, Robinson IK, Mao HK - Nat Commun (2013)

Overall schematic of the experimental setup.A large opening panoramic diamond-anvil cell is used to compress the studied crystal, positioned at the rotation centre of the diffractometer. An X-ray sensitive charge-coupled device is placed at 1 m away to collect far-field diffraction patterns. The insert scanning-electron microscopy (SEM) picture shows typical gold nanoparticles distributed on a silicon substrate. The zoomed-in figure of the DAC shows the sample environment.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3644065&req=5

f1: Overall schematic of the experimental setup.A large opening panoramic diamond-anvil cell is used to compress the studied crystal, positioned at the rotation centre of the diffractometer. An X-ray sensitive charge-coupled device is placed at 1 m away to collect far-field diffraction patterns. The insert scanning-electron microscopy (SEM) picture shows typical gold nanoparticles distributed on a silicon substrate. The zoomed-in figure of the DAC shows the sample environment.
Mentions: The schematic of the experimental setup is shown in Fig. 1. 3D diffraction patterns from the same gold crystal in a DAC were collected at several pressure conditions up to 6.4 GPa (see Methods section). To reduce the systematic effects of wavefront distortion, typically 5–8 repeated scans were collected at each pressure point, under slightly different alignment conditions, and averaged together. The diffraction data were inverted using phase retrieval algorithms, which utilize sufficiently oversampled diffraction intensities to recover the unmeasured phases of diffraction signal. In the reconstruction process, known information is imposed as constraints. The usual constraints are modulus constraint, which requires that the calculated Fourier intensity agrees with the measured data, and support constraint, which assumes that the sample is finite and isolated from other scatters in real space. We used a reconstruction cycle with an algorithm sequence of 10 error reduction, 150 hybrid-input-output and 40 error reduction. The ‘shrink-wrap’ strategy was used to refine the crystal shape used as a support21.

Bottom Line: Here we report the successful de-convolution of these effects with the recently developed mutual coherent function method to reveal the three-dimensional strain distribution inside a 400 nm gold single crystal during compression within a diamond-anvil cell.The three-dimensional morphology and evolution of the strain under pressures up to 6.4 GPa were obtained with better than 30 nm spatial resolution.In addition to providing a new approach for high-pressure nanotechnology and rheology studies, we draw fundamental conclusions about the origin of the anomalous compressibility of nanocrystals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: High Pressure Synergetic Consortium, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA. wyang@ciw.edu

ABSTRACT
The evolution of morphology and internal strain under high pressure fundamentally alters the physical property, structural stability, phase transition and deformation mechanism of materials. Until now, only averaged strain distributions have been studied. Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging is highly sensitive to the internal strain distribution of individual crystals but requires coherent illumination, which can be compromised by the complex high-pressure sample environment. Here we report the successful de-convolution of these effects with the recently developed mutual coherent function method to reveal the three-dimensional strain distribution inside a 400 nm gold single crystal during compression within a diamond-anvil cell. The three-dimensional morphology and evolution of the strain under pressures up to 6.4 GPa were obtained with better than 30 nm spatial resolution. In addition to providing a new approach for high-pressure nanotechnology and rheology studies, we draw fundamental conclusions about the origin of the anomalous compressibility of nanocrystals.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus