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The association between nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease and diabetes.

Ou HY, Wang CY, Yang YC, Chen MF, Chang CJ - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: With an increase in glycemia, a significantly greater proportion of subjects had NAFLD and fatty pancreas (test for trend p<0.05).Similar trends were also found for hypertension, general and central obesity, low-HDL cholesterol, and hypertriglyceridemia.Both NAFLD and fatty pancreas were associated with diabetes independent of age, gender, adiposity, and other cardiometabolic risk factors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, National Cheng-Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Fatty infiltration of the pancreas has been shown to interfere with insulin secretion. Both insulin sensitivity and secretion are important in the pathogenesis of diabetes and prediabetes. However, the relationship between diabetes, prediabetes, and fatty pancreas remains unknown. We aim to investigate the relationships that fatty pancreas and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) have with prediabetes and diabetes in a Chinese population.

Patients and methods: This was a cross-sectional study. A total of 7,464 subjects were recruited. NAFLD and fatty pancreas were assessed by sonography. Clinico-metabolic parameters were compared among subjects with normoglycemia, prediabetes, and diabetes. Multinomial logistic regression was used to evaluate the relationship between fatty pancreas and NAFLD and diabetes or prediabetes with adjustment for cardiometabolic risk factors.

Results: With an increase in glycemia, a significantly greater proportion of subjects had NAFLD and fatty pancreas (test for trend p<0.05). Similar trends were also found for hypertension, general and central obesity, low-HDL cholesterol, and hypertriglyceridemia. In the logistic regression analysis, age, hypertension, male gender, hypertriglyceridemia, and central obesity were significantly associated with prediabetes and diabetes. Furthermore, the ORs of prediabetes and diabetes for NAFLD were 1.798 (95% CI 1.544-2.094) and 2.578 (95% CI 2.024-3.284), respectively. In addition, fatty pancreas was independently related to diabetes (OR, 1.379; 95% CI, 1.047-1.816) and prediabetes (OR, 1.222; 95% CI, 1.002-1.491) in male subjects.

Conclusions: Both NAFLD and fatty pancreas were associated with diabetes independent of age, gender, adiposity, and other cardiometabolic risk factors. Fatty pancreas was also related to prediabetes in males.

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The proportions of fatty pancreas and NAFLD in all the subjects (A), females (B), and males (C) with normoglycemia, prediabetes, and diabetes.
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pone-0062561-g001: The proportions of fatty pancreas and NAFLD in all the subjects (A), females (B), and males (C) with normoglycemia, prediabetes, and diabetes.

Mentions: In the final analysis, a total of 7,464 subjects were included and classified into normal (n = 5,756, 77%), prediabetes (n = 1,225, 16%), and diabetes (n = 483, 6%) groups. Table 1 shows a comparison of the clinical characteristics among the groups based on gender-stratified analysis. There were significant differences in age,WC, BMI, systolic/diastolic blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, A1C, alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), ALT/AST ratio, total cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL-cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol for both genders. Male subjects had a significantly higher prevalence of NAFLD (50.2% vs 29.9%, p<0.001) and fatty pancreas (18.1% vs 14.2%, p<0.001) than female ones. As seen in Figure 1, with an increase in glycemia, a significantly greater proportion of subjects of both genders had NAFLD and fatty pancreas (p<0.001, test for trend), and similar trends were also found for hypertension, general obesity, central obesity, low-HDL cholesterol, and hypertriglyceridemia. However, there were no significant differences in the lifestyle factors among the groups, such as alcohol consumption and smoking.


The association between nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease and diabetes.

Ou HY, Wang CY, Yang YC, Chen MF, Chang CJ - PLoS ONE (2013)

The proportions of fatty pancreas and NAFLD in all the subjects (A), females (B), and males (C) with normoglycemia, prediabetes, and diabetes.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3643962&req=5

pone-0062561-g001: The proportions of fatty pancreas and NAFLD in all the subjects (A), females (B), and males (C) with normoglycemia, prediabetes, and diabetes.
Mentions: In the final analysis, a total of 7,464 subjects were included and classified into normal (n = 5,756, 77%), prediabetes (n = 1,225, 16%), and diabetes (n = 483, 6%) groups. Table 1 shows a comparison of the clinical characteristics among the groups based on gender-stratified analysis. There were significant differences in age,WC, BMI, systolic/diastolic blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, A1C, alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), ALT/AST ratio, total cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL-cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol for both genders. Male subjects had a significantly higher prevalence of NAFLD (50.2% vs 29.9%, p<0.001) and fatty pancreas (18.1% vs 14.2%, p<0.001) than female ones. As seen in Figure 1, with an increase in glycemia, a significantly greater proportion of subjects of both genders had NAFLD and fatty pancreas (p<0.001, test for trend), and similar trends were also found for hypertension, general obesity, central obesity, low-HDL cholesterol, and hypertriglyceridemia. However, there were no significant differences in the lifestyle factors among the groups, such as alcohol consumption and smoking.

Bottom Line: With an increase in glycemia, a significantly greater proportion of subjects had NAFLD and fatty pancreas (test for trend p<0.05).Similar trends were also found for hypertension, general and central obesity, low-HDL cholesterol, and hypertriglyceridemia.Both NAFLD and fatty pancreas were associated with diabetes independent of age, gender, adiposity, and other cardiometabolic risk factors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, National Cheng-Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Fatty infiltration of the pancreas has been shown to interfere with insulin secretion. Both insulin sensitivity and secretion are important in the pathogenesis of diabetes and prediabetes. However, the relationship between diabetes, prediabetes, and fatty pancreas remains unknown. We aim to investigate the relationships that fatty pancreas and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) have with prediabetes and diabetes in a Chinese population.

Patients and methods: This was a cross-sectional study. A total of 7,464 subjects were recruited. NAFLD and fatty pancreas were assessed by sonography. Clinico-metabolic parameters were compared among subjects with normoglycemia, prediabetes, and diabetes. Multinomial logistic regression was used to evaluate the relationship between fatty pancreas and NAFLD and diabetes or prediabetes with adjustment for cardiometabolic risk factors.

Results: With an increase in glycemia, a significantly greater proportion of subjects had NAFLD and fatty pancreas (test for trend p<0.05). Similar trends were also found for hypertension, general and central obesity, low-HDL cholesterol, and hypertriglyceridemia. In the logistic regression analysis, age, hypertension, male gender, hypertriglyceridemia, and central obesity were significantly associated with prediabetes and diabetes. Furthermore, the ORs of prediabetes and diabetes for NAFLD were 1.798 (95% CI 1.544-2.094) and 2.578 (95% CI 2.024-3.284), respectively. In addition, fatty pancreas was independently related to diabetes (OR, 1.379; 95% CI, 1.047-1.816) and prediabetes (OR, 1.222; 95% CI, 1.002-1.491) in male subjects.

Conclusions: Both NAFLD and fatty pancreas were associated with diabetes independent of age, gender, adiposity, and other cardiometabolic risk factors. Fatty pancreas was also related to prediabetes in males.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus