Limits...
Similar local and landscape processes affect both a common and a rare newt species.

Denoël M, Perez A, Cornet Y, Ficetola GF - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: We tested this hypothesis by examining, through an information-theoretic approach, the importance of ecological processes at multiple scales in the great crested newt Triturus cristatus, regionally endangered and protected in Europe, and the more common smooth newt, Lissotriton vulgaris.The results show that environmental pressures threaten both common and rare species, and therefore the more widespread species should not be neglected in conservation programs.On the other hand, in agreement with the umbrella species concept, targeting conservation efforts on the most demanding species would also protect part of the populations of the most common species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Fish and Amphibian Ethology, Behavioural Biology Unit, Department of Biology, Ecology and Evolution, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium. Mathieu.Denoel@ulg.ac.be

ABSTRACT
Although rare species are often the focus of conservation measures, more common species may experience similar decline and suffer from the same threatening processes. We tested this hypothesis by examining, through an information-theoretic approach, the importance of ecological processes at multiple scales in the great crested newt Triturus cristatus, regionally endangered and protected in Europe, and the more common smooth newt, Lissotriton vulgaris. Both species were similarly affected by the same processes, i.e. suitability of aquatic and terrestrial components of their habitat at different scales, connectivity among breeding sites, and the presence of introduced fish. T. cristatus depended more on water depth and aquatic vegetation than L. vulgaris. The results show that environmental pressures threaten both common and rare species, and therefore the more widespread species should not be neglected in conservation programs. Because environmental trends are leading to a deterioration of aquatic and terrestrial habitat features required by newt populations, populations of the common species may follow the fate of the rarest species. This could have substantial conservation implications because of the numerical importance of common species in ecosystems and because commonness could be a transient state moving towards rarity. On the other hand, in agreement with the umbrella species concept, targeting conservation efforts on the most demanding species would also protect part of the populations of the most common species.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Location of studied ponds in Pays de Herve (Belgium).Blue circles: ponds, yellow patches: studied localities (based on historical presence of Triturus cristatus): 1, En Géliveau; 2, Hansez; 3, Haute Rafhay; 4, Stoki; 5, Margarins; 6, Vogelsang; 7, Blanc Baudet; 8, Gut Benesse Hof; 9, Hof Krompelberg; 10, Gemerhet; 11, Corney; 12, Harbenden. Geographic coordinates: Belgian Lambert Grid (expressed in km).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3643927&req=5

pone-0062727-g002: Location of studied ponds in Pays de Herve (Belgium).Blue circles: ponds, yellow patches: studied localities (based on historical presence of Triturus cristatus): 1, En Géliveau; 2, Hansez; 3, Haute Rafhay; 4, Stoki; 5, Margarins; 6, Vogelsang; 7, Blanc Baudet; 8, Gut Benesse Hof; 9, Hof Krompelberg; 10, Gemerhet; 11, Corney; 12, Harbenden. Geographic coordinates: Belgian Lambert Grid (expressed in km).

Mentions: This study was conducted in Pays de Herve, an agricultural area of eastern Belgium at the border of Germany and the Netherlands. The sampling areas were chosen from the known distribution of the crested newt [22]. We surveyed 74 ponds during the newt reproductive season (March–June 2008) (Figure 2). The surveys took place in the 12 ponds historically inhabited by this species (1990–2004), in all ponds within a 500-m radius around these ponds, and also within a 500-m radius around these new sets of surrounding ponds (Figure 2). Surrounding ponds were located using recent topographic maps (Institut Geographic National [IGN], 1∶20,000, published in 1999–2000), colour orthoimages (IGN: Direction Générale de l’Agriculture, 0.5-m resolution, 2006), and by field observations.


Similar local and landscape processes affect both a common and a rare newt species.

Denoël M, Perez A, Cornet Y, Ficetola GF - PLoS ONE (2013)

Location of studied ponds in Pays de Herve (Belgium).Blue circles: ponds, yellow patches: studied localities (based on historical presence of Triturus cristatus): 1, En Géliveau; 2, Hansez; 3, Haute Rafhay; 4, Stoki; 5, Margarins; 6, Vogelsang; 7, Blanc Baudet; 8, Gut Benesse Hof; 9, Hof Krompelberg; 10, Gemerhet; 11, Corney; 12, Harbenden. Geographic coordinates: Belgian Lambert Grid (expressed in km).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3643927&req=5

pone-0062727-g002: Location of studied ponds in Pays de Herve (Belgium).Blue circles: ponds, yellow patches: studied localities (based on historical presence of Triturus cristatus): 1, En Géliveau; 2, Hansez; 3, Haute Rafhay; 4, Stoki; 5, Margarins; 6, Vogelsang; 7, Blanc Baudet; 8, Gut Benesse Hof; 9, Hof Krompelberg; 10, Gemerhet; 11, Corney; 12, Harbenden. Geographic coordinates: Belgian Lambert Grid (expressed in km).
Mentions: This study was conducted in Pays de Herve, an agricultural area of eastern Belgium at the border of Germany and the Netherlands. The sampling areas were chosen from the known distribution of the crested newt [22]. We surveyed 74 ponds during the newt reproductive season (March–June 2008) (Figure 2). The surveys took place in the 12 ponds historically inhabited by this species (1990–2004), in all ponds within a 500-m radius around these ponds, and also within a 500-m radius around these new sets of surrounding ponds (Figure 2). Surrounding ponds were located using recent topographic maps (Institut Geographic National [IGN], 1∶20,000, published in 1999–2000), colour orthoimages (IGN: Direction Générale de l’Agriculture, 0.5-m resolution, 2006), and by field observations.

Bottom Line: We tested this hypothesis by examining, through an information-theoretic approach, the importance of ecological processes at multiple scales in the great crested newt Triturus cristatus, regionally endangered and protected in Europe, and the more common smooth newt, Lissotriton vulgaris.The results show that environmental pressures threaten both common and rare species, and therefore the more widespread species should not be neglected in conservation programs.On the other hand, in agreement with the umbrella species concept, targeting conservation efforts on the most demanding species would also protect part of the populations of the most common species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Fish and Amphibian Ethology, Behavioural Biology Unit, Department of Biology, Ecology and Evolution, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium. Mathieu.Denoel@ulg.ac.be

ABSTRACT
Although rare species are often the focus of conservation measures, more common species may experience similar decline and suffer from the same threatening processes. We tested this hypothesis by examining, through an information-theoretic approach, the importance of ecological processes at multiple scales in the great crested newt Triturus cristatus, regionally endangered and protected in Europe, and the more common smooth newt, Lissotriton vulgaris. Both species were similarly affected by the same processes, i.e. suitability of aquatic and terrestrial components of their habitat at different scales, connectivity among breeding sites, and the presence of introduced fish. T. cristatus depended more on water depth and aquatic vegetation than L. vulgaris. The results show that environmental pressures threaten both common and rare species, and therefore the more widespread species should not be neglected in conservation programs. Because environmental trends are leading to a deterioration of aquatic and terrestrial habitat features required by newt populations, populations of the common species may follow the fate of the rarest species. This could have substantial conservation implications because of the numerical importance of common species in ecosystems and because commonness could be a transient state moving towards rarity. On the other hand, in agreement with the umbrella species concept, targeting conservation efforts on the most demanding species would also protect part of the populations of the most common species.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus