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Euphorbia tirucalli L.-comprehensive characterization of a drought tolerant plant with a potential as biofuel source.

Hastilestari BR, Mudersbach M, Tomala F, Vogt H, Biskupek-Korell B, Van Damme P, Guretzki S, Papenbrock J - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: Of late, decrease in mineral oil supplies has stimulated research on use of biomass as an alternative energy source.Climate change has brought problems such as increased drought and erratic rains.Malate measurement indicates that there is induction of CAM in leaves following drought stress.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Botany, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz University Hannover, Hannover, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Of late, decrease in mineral oil supplies has stimulated research on use of biomass as an alternative energy source. Climate change has brought problems such as increased drought and erratic rains. This, together with a rise in land degeneration problems with concomitant loss in soil fertility has inspired the scientific world to look for alternative bio-energy species. Euphorbia tirucalli L., a tree with C3/CAM metabolism in leaves/stem, can be cultivated on marginal, arid land and could be a good alternative source of biofuel. We analyzed a broad variety of E. tirucalli plants collected from different countries for their genetic diversity using AFLP. Physiological responses to induced drought stress were determined in a number of genotypes by monitoring growth parameters and influence on photosynthesis. For future breeding of economically interesting genotypes, rubber content and biogas production were quantified. Cluster analysis shows that the studied genotypes are divided into two groups, African and mostly non-African genotypes. Different genotypes respond significantly different to various levels of water. Malate measurement indicates that there is induction of CAM in leaves following drought stress. Rubber content varies strongly between genotypes. An investigation of the biogas production capacities of six E. tirucalli genotypes reveals biogas yields higher than from rapeseed but lower than maize silage.

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Box plot (n = 3) of malate contents of stems and leaves (µmol g−1 fresh weight) of E.tirucalli genotypes Morroco (Mor) and Senegal (Sen).
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pone-0063501-g004: Box plot (n = 3) of malate contents of stems and leaves (µmol g−1 fresh weight) of E.tirucalli genotypes Morroco (Mor) and Senegal (Sen).

Mentions: Differences in photosynthetic pathways were ascertained by comparing malate content of leaves and stems before drought stress and after exposure to drought stress. Our results show that before drought exposure, there was malate content oscillation between day and night in both genotypes' stems (Fig. 4). In genotype Morocco, malate content of stems at the end of light period was 58.9% lower than that at the end of dark period. Meanwhile, decrease in genotype Senegal was only 17.4%.


Euphorbia tirucalli L.-comprehensive characterization of a drought tolerant plant with a potential as biofuel source.

Hastilestari BR, Mudersbach M, Tomala F, Vogt H, Biskupek-Korell B, Van Damme P, Guretzki S, Papenbrock J - PLoS ONE (2013)

Box plot (n = 3) of malate contents of stems and leaves (µmol g−1 fresh weight) of E.tirucalli genotypes Morroco (Mor) and Senegal (Sen).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3643915&req=5

pone-0063501-g004: Box plot (n = 3) of malate contents of stems and leaves (µmol g−1 fresh weight) of E.tirucalli genotypes Morroco (Mor) and Senegal (Sen).
Mentions: Differences in photosynthetic pathways were ascertained by comparing malate content of leaves and stems before drought stress and after exposure to drought stress. Our results show that before drought exposure, there was malate content oscillation between day and night in both genotypes' stems (Fig. 4). In genotype Morocco, malate content of stems at the end of light period was 58.9% lower than that at the end of dark period. Meanwhile, decrease in genotype Senegal was only 17.4%.

Bottom Line: Of late, decrease in mineral oil supplies has stimulated research on use of biomass as an alternative energy source.Climate change has brought problems such as increased drought and erratic rains.Malate measurement indicates that there is induction of CAM in leaves following drought stress.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Botany, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz University Hannover, Hannover, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Of late, decrease in mineral oil supplies has stimulated research on use of biomass as an alternative energy source. Climate change has brought problems such as increased drought and erratic rains. This, together with a rise in land degeneration problems with concomitant loss in soil fertility has inspired the scientific world to look for alternative bio-energy species. Euphorbia tirucalli L., a tree with C3/CAM metabolism in leaves/stem, can be cultivated on marginal, arid land and could be a good alternative source of biofuel. We analyzed a broad variety of E. tirucalli plants collected from different countries for their genetic diversity using AFLP. Physiological responses to induced drought stress were determined in a number of genotypes by monitoring growth parameters and influence on photosynthesis. For future breeding of economically interesting genotypes, rubber content and biogas production were quantified. Cluster analysis shows that the studied genotypes are divided into two groups, African and mostly non-African genotypes. Different genotypes respond significantly different to various levels of water. Malate measurement indicates that there is induction of CAM in leaves following drought stress. Rubber content varies strongly between genotypes. An investigation of the biogas production capacities of six E. tirucalli genotypes reveals biogas yields higher than from rapeseed but lower than maize silage.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus