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The effect of threat on novelty evoked amygdala responses.

Balderston NL, Schultz DH, Helmstetter FJ - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: Surprisingly, we found that novel images of snakes and flowers evoke more amygdala activity than repeated images of snakes and flowers.Our results further confirm the robustness of the novelty evoked amygdala responses, even when compared with effects more traditionally associated with the amygdala.In addition, our results suggest that threatening stimuli may prime the amygdala to respond to other types of stimuli as well.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
A number of recent papers have suggested that the amygdala plays a role in the brain's novelty detection circuit. In a recent study, we showed that this role may be specific to certain classes of biologically-relevant stimuli, such as human faces. The purpose of the present experiment was to determine whether other biologically-relevant stimuli also evoke novelty specific amygdala responses. To test this idea, we presented novel and repeated images of snakes and flowers while measuring BOLD. Surprisingly, we found that novel images of snakes and flowers evoke more amygdala activity than repeated images of snakes and flowers. Our results further confirm the robustness of the novelty evoked amygdala responses, even when compared with effects more traditionally associated with the amygdala. In addition, our results suggest that threatening stimuli may prime the amygdala to respond to other types of stimuli as well.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

We sampled BOLD activity in the amygdala and hippocampus using anatomical regions of interest.We defined the amygdala and hippocampus for each individual using Freesurfer, and sampled BOLD in native space activity using these regions of interest. The images in this figure show the axial, sagittal, coronal, and rendered view of the amygdala and hippocampus in Talairach space, collapsed across subjects.
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pone-0063220-g002: We sampled BOLD activity in the amygdala and hippocampus using anatomical regions of interest.We defined the amygdala and hippocampus for each individual using Freesurfer, and sampled BOLD in native space activity using these regions of interest. The images in this figure show the axial, sagittal, coronal, and rendered view of the amygdala and hippocampus in Talairach space, collapsed across subjects.

Mentions: Because these hypotheses stem from our previously published work, we used the same procedures to present the stimuli and analyze the imaging data [12]. Briefly, we presented novel and repeated images of snakes and flowers, while measuring BOLD activity. We anatomically identified the amygdala and hippocampus using each subject’s T1 weighted volume (See Figure 2 for probability map in Talairach space). We sampled the BOLD activity in these structures during the last 2 seconds of the stimulus period. We performed a 2 (Novel vs. Repeated) × 2 (Snake vs. Flower) × 2 (Left vs. Right) repeated measures ANOVA on those values.


The effect of threat on novelty evoked amygdala responses.

Balderston NL, Schultz DH, Helmstetter FJ - PLoS ONE (2013)

We sampled BOLD activity in the amygdala and hippocampus using anatomical regions of interest.We defined the amygdala and hippocampus for each individual using Freesurfer, and sampled BOLD in native space activity using these regions of interest. The images in this figure show the axial, sagittal, coronal, and rendered view of the amygdala and hippocampus in Talairach space, collapsed across subjects.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3643910&req=5

pone-0063220-g002: We sampled BOLD activity in the amygdala and hippocampus using anatomical regions of interest.We defined the amygdala and hippocampus for each individual using Freesurfer, and sampled BOLD in native space activity using these regions of interest. The images in this figure show the axial, sagittal, coronal, and rendered view of the amygdala and hippocampus in Talairach space, collapsed across subjects.
Mentions: Because these hypotheses stem from our previously published work, we used the same procedures to present the stimuli and analyze the imaging data [12]. Briefly, we presented novel and repeated images of snakes and flowers, while measuring BOLD activity. We anatomically identified the amygdala and hippocampus using each subject’s T1 weighted volume (See Figure 2 for probability map in Talairach space). We sampled the BOLD activity in these structures during the last 2 seconds of the stimulus period. We performed a 2 (Novel vs. Repeated) × 2 (Snake vs. Flower) × 2 (Left vs. Right) repeated measures ANOVA on those values.

Bottom Line: Surprisingly, we found that novel images of snakes and flowers evoke more amygdala activity than repeated images of snakes and flowers.Our results further confirm the robustness of the novelty evoked amygdala responses, even when compared with effects more traditionally associated with the amygdala.In addition, our results suggest that threatening stimuli may prime the amygdala to respond to other types of stimuli as well.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
A number of recent papers have suggested that the amygdala plays a role in the brain's novelty detection circuit. In a recent study, we showed that this role may be specific to certain classes of biologically-relevant stimuli, such as human faces. The purpose of the present experiment was to determine whether other biologically-relevant stimuli also evoke novelty specific amygdala responses. To test this idea, we presented novel and repeated images of snakes and flowers while measuring BOLD. Surprisingly, we found that novel images of snakes and flowers evoke more amygdala activity than repeated images of snakes and flowers. Our results further confirm the robustness of the novelty evoked amygdala responses, even when compared with effects more traditionally associated with the amygdala. In addition, our results suggest that threatening stimuli may prime the amygdala to respond to other types of stimuli as well.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus