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The effect of threat on novelty evoked amygdala responses.

Balderston NL, Schultz DH, Helmstetter FJ - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: Surprisingly, we found that novel images of snakes and flowers evoke more amygdala activity than repeated images of snakes and flowers.Our results further confirm the robustness of the novelty evoked amygdala responses, even when compared with effects more traditionally associated with the amygdala.In addition, our results suggest that threatening stimuli may prime the amygdala to respond to other types of stimuli as well.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
A number of recent papers have suggested that the amygdala plays a role in the brain's novelty detection circuit. In a recent study, we showed that this role may be specific to certain classes of biologically-relevant stimuli, such as human faces. The purpose of the present experiment was to determine whether other biologically-relevant stimuli also evoke novelty specific amygdala responses. To test this idea, we presented novel and repeated images of snakes and flowers while measuring BOLD. Surprisingly, we found that novel images of snakes and flowers evoke more amygdala activity than repeated images of snakes and flowers. Our results further confirm the robustness of the novelty evoked amygdala responses, even when compared with effects more traditionally associated with the amygdala. In addition, our results suggest that threatening stimuli may prime the amygdala to respond to other types of stimuli as well.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

We presented novel and repeated images of snakes and flowers while measuring BOLD activity.(a) We presented images sequentially for 8 seconds each in an event related design. All participants saw 5 presentations of novel snake (NS) and 5 presentations of novel flower (NF) images indicated by the light green and light purple outlines, respectively. In addition all saw 5 repetitions of one snake (RS) and one flower (RF) image, shown in dark green and dark purple respectively.
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pone-0063220-g001: We presented novel and repeated images of snakes and flowers while measuring BOLD activity.(a) We presented images sequentially for 8 seconds each in an event related design. All participants saw 5 presentations of novel snake (NS) and 5 presentations of novel flower (NF) images indicated by the light green and light purple outlines, respectively. In addition all saw 5 repetitions of one snake (RS) and one flower (RF) image, shown in dark green and dark purple respectively.

Mentions: During the experiment, we presented a series of 20 eight-second novel and repeated images (See Figure 1), using the same procedures as in a previous study [12]. The novel conditions included five presentations of different images, where each image was presented only once. The repeated conditions included five presentations of a single image, which was counterbalanced across subjects. For the repeated conditions we included only trials where the image had been repeated. Therefore, the initial presentation of these stimuli was counted in the respective novel categories. We also manipulated the content of the stimuli by presenting images of snakes (novel = NS; repeated = RS) and flowers (novel = NF; repeated = RF) from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) database [21]. See Figure 1 for design summary and Table 1 for affective ratings.


The effect of threat on novelty evoked amygdala responses.

Balderston NL, Schultz DH, Helmstetter FJ - PLoS ONE (2013)

We presented novel and repeated images of snakes and flowers while measuring BOLD activity.(a) We presented images sequentially for 8 seconds each in an event related design. All participants saw 5 presentations of novel snake (NS) and 5 presentations of novel flower (NF) images indicated by the light green and light purple outlines, respectively. In addition all saw 5 repetitions of one snake (RS) and one flower (RF) image, shown in dark green and dark purple respectively.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3643910&req=5

pone-0063220-g001: We presented novel and repeated images of snakes and flowers while measuring BOLD activity.(a) We presented images sequentially for 8 seconds each in an event related design. All participants saw 5 presentations of novel snake (NS) and 5 presentations of novel flower (NF) images indicated by the light green and light purple outlines, respectively. In addition all saw 5 repetitions of one snake (RS) and one flower (RF) image, shown in dark green and dark purple respectively.
Mentions: During the experiment, we presented a series of 20 eight-second novel and repeated images (See Figure 1), using the same procedures as in a previous study [12]. The novel conditions included five presentations of different images, where each image was presented only once. The repeated conditions included five presentations of a single image, which was counterbalanced across subjects. For the repeated conditions we included only trials where the image had been repeated. Therefore, the initial presentation of these stimuli was counted in the respective novel categories. We also manipulated the content of the stimuli by presenting images of snakes (novel = NS; repeated = RS) and flowers (novel = NF; repeated = RF) from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) database [21]. See Figure 1 for design summary and Table 1 for affective ratings.

Bottom Line: Surprisingly, we found that novel images of snakes and flowers evoke more amygdala activity than repeated images of snakes and flowers.Our results further confirm the robustness of the novelty evoked amygdala responses, even when compared with effects more traditionally associated with the amygdala.In addition, our results suggest that threatening stimuli may prime the amygdala to respond to other types of stimuli as well.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
A number of recent papers have suggested that the amygdala plays a role in the brain's novelty detection circuit. In a recent study, we showed that this role may be specific to certain classes of biologically-relevant stimuli, such as human faces. The purpose of the present experiment was to determine whether other biologically-relevant stimuli also evoke novelty specific amygdala responses. To test this idea, we presented novel and repeated images of snakes and flowers while measuring BOLD. Surprisingly, we found that novel images of snakes and flowers evoke more amygdala activity than repeated images of snakes and flowers. Our results further confirm the robustness of the novelty evoked amygdala responses, even when compared with effects more traditionally associated with the amygdala. In addition, our results suggest that threatening stimuli may prime the amygdala to respond to other types of stimuli as well.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus