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The energy expenditure of sedentary behavior: a whole room calorimeter study.

Newton RL, Han H, Zderic T, Hamilton MT, Hamilton M - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: This study was designed to determine the energy expenditure associated with common sedentary behaviors.In the afternoon, the participants were fed lunch and then the activities were repeated.The results show that the energy expenditure values between the morning and afternoon sessions were not significantly different (p = .232).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Preventive Medicine and Healthy Aging, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States of America. Robert.Newton@pbrc.edu

ABSTRACT
It has recently been recommended that sedentary behavior be defined as sitting or reclining activities expending less than 1.5 metabolic equivalents (METs), which is distinct from the traditional viewpoint based on insufficient moderate-vigorous activity or formal exercise. This study was designed to determine the energy expenditure associated with common sedentary behaviors. Twenty-five African American adults (BMI 27.8 ± 5.5) participated in the metabolic chamber study. Participants entered the metabolic chamber in the morning and their basal metabolic rate was estimated. They were fed breakfast and then engaged in four different sedentary behaviors sequentially, lasting 30 minutes each. The activities included reclining, watching TV, reading, and typing on a computer. In the afternoon, the participants were fed lunch and then the activities were repeated. The results show that the energy expenditure values between the morning and afternoon sessions were not significantly different (p = .232). The mean energy expenditure of postprandial reclining (0.97 METs) was slightly, but significantly, lower than postprandial watching TV (p = .021) and typing (p<.001). There were no differences in energy cost (1.03-1.06 METs) between the seated (i.e., reading, typing, watching TV) sedentary activities. The energy expenditure of several common sedentary behaviors was approximately 1.0 METs in the postprandial state. The results support the conclusion that the average energy cost of common sedentary behaviors is narrowly banded around 1.0 METs in the postprandial state.

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Oxygen consumption in MET units during sedentary behaviors.Each activity was measured for 30 minutes following breakfast and lunch. Bars represent the average MET value for each sedentary activity across breakfast and lunch. The dashed line represents the recommended MET value for sedentary behaviors. The solid line represents the average MET value for postprandial reclining. One MET is by definition is 3.5 ml O2/kg/min. Postprandial seated activities on average required a 7% greater metabolic rate than postprandial reclining, and the average of the four sedentary behaviors in the postprandial state was 1.02 METs. Note: Values with different superscripts are significantly different from one another.
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pone-0063171-g001: Oxygen consumption in MET units during sedentary behaviors.Each activity was measured for 30 minutes following breakfast and lunch. Bars represent the average MET value for each sedentary activity across breakfast and lunch. The dashed line represents the recommended MET value for sedentary behaviors. The solid line represents the average MET value for postprandial reclining. One MET is by definition is 3.5 ml O2/kg/min. Postprandial seated activities on average required a 7% greater metabolic rate than postprandial reclining, and the average of the four sedentary behaviors in the postprandial state was 1.02 METs. Note: Values with different superscripts are significantly different from one another.

Mentions: The increase in oxygen consumption and energy expenditure from pre- to postprandial reclining was ∼18% (p<0.001). To determine the effect of the sitting activities on energy expenditure independent of the feeding state we compared the postprandial reclining conditions to the postprandial seated conditions. The oxygen consumption and energy expenditure of common seated activities was on average 7% (0.07 kcal/kg/hr) greater than the reclining posture (p<0.001). In Figure 1, the average METs (mL O2/kg/min/3.5) of each seated activity are reported in relation to the recommended 1.5 METs threshold for defining sedentary activity. [23].


The energy expenditure of sedentary behavior: a whole room calorimeter study.

Newton RL, Han H, Zderic T, Hamilton MT, Hamilton M - PLoS ONE (2013)

Oxygen consumption in MET units during sedentary behaviors.Each activity was measured for 30 minutes following breakfast and lunch. Bars represent the average MET value for each sedentary activity across breakfast and lunch. The dashed line represents the recommended MET value for sedentary behaviors. The solid line represents the average MET value for postprandial reclining. One MET is by definition is 3.5 ml O2/kg/min. Postprandial seated activities on average required a 7% greater metabolic rate than postprandial reclining, and the average of the four sedentary behaviors in the postprandial state was 1.02 METs. Note: Values with different superscripts are significantly different from one another.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3643905&req=5

pone-0063171-g001: Oxygen consumption in MET units during sedentary behaviors.Each activity was measured for 30 minutes following breakfast and lunch. Bars represent the average MET value for each sedentary activity across breakfast and lunch. The dashed line represents the recommended MET value for sedentary behaviors. The solid line represents the average MET value for postprandial reclining. One MET is by definition is 3.5 ml O2/kg/min. Postprandial seated activities on average required a 7% greater metabolic rate than postprandial reclining, and the average of the four sedentary behaviors in the postprandial state was 1.02 METs. Note: Values with different superscripts are significantly different from one another.
Mentions: The increase in oxygen consumption and energy expenditure from pre- to postprandial reclining was ∼18% (p<0.001). To determine the effect of the sitting activities on energy expenditure independent of the feeding state we compared the postprandial reclining conditions to the postprandial seated conditions. The oxygen consumption and energy expenditure of common seated activities was on average 7% (0.07 kcal/kg/hr) greater than the reclining posture (p<0.001). In Figure 1, the average METs (mL O2/kg/min/3.5) of each seated activity are reported in relation to the recommended 1.5 METs threshold for defining sedentary activity. [23].

Bottom Line: This study was designed to determine the energy expenditure associated with common sedentary behaviors.In the afternoon, the participants were fed lunch and then the activities were repeated.The results show that the energy expenditure values between the morning and afternoon sessions were not significantly different (p = .232).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Preventive Medicine and Healthy Aging, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States of America. Robert.Newton@pbrc.edu

ABSTRACT
It has recently been recommended that sedentary behavior be defined as sitting or reclining activities expending less than 1.5 metabolic equivalents (METs), which is distinct from the traditional viewpoint based on insufficient moderate-vigorous activity or formal exercise. This study was designed to determine the energy expenditure associated with common sedentary behaviors. Twenty-five African American adults (BMI 27.8 ± 5.5) participated in the metabolic chamber study. Participants entered the metabolic chamber in the morning and their basal metabolic rate was estimated. They were fed breakfast and then engaged in four different sedentary behaviors sequentially, lasting 30 minutes each. The activities included reclining, watching TV, reading, and typing on a computer. In the afternoon, the participants were fed lunch and then the activities were repeated. The results show that the energy expenditure values between the morning and afternoon sessions were not significantly different (p = .232). The mean energy expenditure of postprandial reclining (0.97 METs) was slightly, but significantly, lower than postprandial watching TV (p = .021) and typing (p<.001). There were no differences in energy cost (1.03-1.06 METs) between the seated (i.e., reading, typing, watching TV) sedentary activities. The energy expenditure of several common sedentary behaviors was approximately 1.0 METs in the postprandial state. The results support the conclusion that the average energy cost of common sedentary behaviors is narrowly banded around 1.0 METs in the postprandial state.

Show MeSH